genitive case


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to genitive case: accusative case, ablative case, dative case
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genitive case - the case expressing ownership
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
attributive genitive, attributive genitive case - a word in the genitive case that is used as an attributive adjective; "an example of the attributive genetive is `John's' in `John's mother'"
Translations
druhý pádgenitiv
genitivo
genetiivi
genitiv
birtokos eset
eignarfall
kilmininkas
rodilnik
genitiv
References in classic literature ?
Then the teacher lets me softly down with the remark that whenever the word "wegen" drops into a sentence, it ALWAYS throws that subject into the GENITIVE case, regardless of consequences--and therefore this bird stayed in the blacksmith shop "wegen DES Regens.
49 sasthi sthaneyoga, which provides the genitive with the technical meaning 'in place of', are invoked only when there is doubt in the relation the genitive case signifies, ii) Since the purpose of language use from a speaker's perspective is that another person understands the meaning the speaker wishes to convey, a speech unit should be caused by a meaning and not vice versa.
The name is a noun in the genitive case," Nazari said in (http://zookeys.
Lunt 2001) constitutes a pronoun in the accusative case--a short form of the full pronoun sebe, which in OCS may mark either the accusative case or the genitive case.
For example, buyer is expressed by nominative case as well as by dative case without preposition; seller is expressed by genitive case with preposition as well as nominative case.
The Genitive Case in Dutch and German: A Study of Morphosyntactic Change in Codified Languages
This is in sharp contrast to Durani's (2007) semantic interpretation which is limited to the genitive case shown by - e-.
Instead, the dictionary provides the ending of the noun in the genitive case, as these endings are often problematic for users.
This term has the genitive case in the locative sense, or in the accusative sense.
The word VEXILL[AT]IO ('detachment') seems likely in line 3, which we can expand to the genitive case vexillationis.
She could easily conjugate and use the correct form of the Arabic verbs, make plural from singular, correctly use Arabic prepositions in genitive case and make nominal and verbal sentences.