genius


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gen·ius

 (jēn′yəs)
n. pl. gen·ius·es
1.
a. Extraordinary intellectual and creative power: artistic works of genius.
b. A person of extraordinary intellect and talent.
c. A person who has an exceptionally high intelligence quotient, typically above 140.
2.
a. A strong natural talent, aptitude, or inclination: has a genius for choosing the right words.
b. One who has such a talent or inclination: a genius at diplomacy.
3. The prevailing spirit or distinctive character, as of a place, a person, or an era: the genius of Elizabethan England.
4. pl. ge·ni·i (jē′nē-ī′) Roman Mythology A tutelary deity or guardian spirit of a person or place.

[Middle English, guardian spirit, from Latin; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

genius

(ˈdʒiːnɪəs; -njəs)
n, pl -uses or (for senses 5, 6)genii (ˈdʒiːnɪˌaɪ)
1. a person with exceptional ability, esp of a highly original kind
2. such ability or capacity: Mozart's musical genius.
3. the distinctive spirit or creative nature of a nation, era, language, etc
4. a person considered as exerting great influence of a certain sort: an evil genius.
5. (Classical Myth & Legend) Roman myth
a. the guiding spirit who attends a person from birth to death
b. the guardian spirit of a place, group of people, or institution
6. (Non-European Myth & Legend) Arabian myth (usually plural) a demon; jinn
adj
clever and original
[C16: from Latin, from gignere to beget]

gen•ius

(ˈdʒin yəs)

n., pl. gen•ius•es for 2,3,8, gen•i•i (ˈdʒi niˌaɪ)
for 6,7,9.
1. an exceptional natural capacity of intellect, esp. as shown in creative and original work in science, art, music, etc.: the genius of Mozart.
2. a person having such capacity.
3. natural ability; talent: a genius for leadership.
4. distinctive character or spirit, as of a nation, period, or language.
5. the guardian spirit of a place, person, institution, etc.
6. a person who strongly influences for good or ill the character, conduct, or destiny of a person, place, or thing: an evil genius.
7. jinn.
[1350–1400; < Latin: tutelary deity or genius of a person; compare genus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genius - someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originalitygenius - someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality; "Mozart was a child genius"; "he's smart but he's no Einstein"
intellectual, intellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
prodigy - an unusually gifted or intelligent (young) person; someone whose talents excite wonder and admiration; "she is a chess prodigy"
2.genius - unusual mental ability
intelligence - the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
coruscation - a sudden or striking display of brilliance; "coruscations of great wit"
pyrotechnics - (music) brilliance of display (as in the performance of music)
scintillation - a brilliant display of wit
3.genius - someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any fieldgenius - someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
track star - a star runner
4.genius - exceptional creative ability
creative thinking, creativeness, creativity - the ability to create
5.genius - a natural talent; "he has a flair for mathematics"; "he has a genius for interior decorating"
endowment, natural endowment, talent, gift - natural abilities or qualities

genius

noun
1. brilliance, ability, talent, capacity, gift, bent, faculty, excellence, endowment, flair, inclination, knack, propensity, aptitude, cleverness, creative power, GEnys (S.M.S.) This is the mark of her genius as a designer.
2. master, expert, mastermind, brain (informal), buff (informal), intellect (informal), adept, maestro, virtuoso, boffin (Brit. informal), whiz (informal), hotshot (informal), rocket scientist (informal, chiefly U.S.), wonk (informal), brainbox, maven (U.S.), master-hand, fundi (S. African), GEnys (S.M.S.) a 14-year-old mathematical genius
master fool, idiot, dunce, imbecile, simpleton, dolt, half-wit, nincompoop
Quotations
"Genius is one per cent inspiration and ninety-nine per cent perspiration" [Thomas Alva Edison Life]
"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him" [Jonathan Swift Thoughts on Various Subjects]
"The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction" [Dr. Johnson Lives of the English Poets]
"Genius is...the child of imitation" [Joshua Reynolds Discourses on Art]
"If I have seen further [than other men] it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants" [Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke]
"Genius must be born, and never can be taught" [John Dryden To Mr. Congreve]
"In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts" [Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance]
"Genius does what it must,"
"And Talent does what it can" [Owen Meredith Last Words of a Sensitive Second-rate Poet]
"It takes a lot of time to be a genius, you have to sit around so much doing nothing, really doing nothing" [Gertrude Stein Everybody's Autobiography]
"Genius is only a greater aptitude for patience" [Comte de Buffon]

genius

noun
1. Liveliness and vivacity of imagination:
2. An innate capability:
Translations
عَبْقَريعَبْقَرِيّ
génius
geni
neronerokkuus
genij
zsenizsenialitásgéniuszlángelmelángész
snillingur
天才
천재
genijus
ģēnijs
génius
genij
geni
อัจฉริยบุคคล
thiên tài

genius

[ˈdʒiːnɪəs] N (geniuses (pl)) (= person) → genio m; (= cleverness) → genialidad f; (= talent) → don m
he's a geniuses un genio, es genial
you're a genius! (iro) → ¡eres un hacha!
a man of geniusun hombre genial
she's a mathematical geniuses un genio para las matemáticas
to have a genius for (doing) sthtener un don especial para (hacer) algo
you have a genius for forgetting thingstienes un don especial para olvidar las cosas

genius

[ˈdʒiːniəs] n
(= person) → génie m
She's a genius! → C'est un génie!
(= cleverness) → génie m
pure genius → du génie pur et simple
a stroke of genius → un trait de génie
(= gift) → génie m
to have a genius for sth → avoir le génie de qch

genius

n pl <-es or genii>
Genie nt; (= mental or creative capacity)Genius m, → Schöpferkraft f; her real genius as a designerihre Genialität als Designerin; a man of geniusein genialer Mensch, ein Genie nt; to have a genius for something/doing something (= talent)eine besondere Gabe für etw haben/dafür haben, etw zu tun; her genius for languagesihre hohe Sprachbegabung; she has a genius for controversysie hat ein Talent dafür, Streit anzufangen; a flash of geniuseine geniale Eingebung
(= spirit: of period, country etc) → (Zeit)geist m
(= bad influence) evil geniusböser Geist

genius

[ˈdʒiːnɪəs] ngenio
to have a genius for sth/for doing sth → essere molto bravo/a in qc/a fare qc

genius

(ˈdʒiːnjəs) plural ˈgeniuses noun
a person who is very clever. The new professor of mathematics has been described as a genius.

genius

عَبْقَرِيّ génius geni Genie μεγαλοφυΐα genio nero génie genij genio 天才 천재 genie geni geniusz génio, gênio гений geni อัจฉริยบุคคล dahi thiên tài 天才

genius

n genio
References in classic literature ?
exclaimed Beth, who firmly believed that her sisters were gifted with wonderful genius in all things.
In something he had written as a school boy she thought she had recognized the spark of genius and wanted to blow on the spark.
Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages; hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions.
Or, by some genius of memory, to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft.
And when they sez that the old man--excuse my freedom, but that's the way the boys talk of your father, meaning no harm-- the old man, instead o' trying to corral rich widders--grass or otherwise--to spend their money on the big works for the gold that ain't there yet--should stay in Devil's Ford and put all his sabe and genius into grindin' out the little gold that is there, I sez to them that it ain't your father's style.
To the thoughtful mind there will be no tinge of superstition in what we figuratively express, by affirming that the ghost of a dead progenitor--perhaps as a portion of his own punishment--is often doomed to become the Evil Genius of his family.
To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.
It made him anxious, though he watched himself; he had been anxious all day and, even while in his usual sweet little manner he sat at table, had needed all his small strange genius to give it a gloss.
To the right there is a door from the saloon, with a few loafers in the doorway, and in the corner beyond it a bar, with a presiding genius clad in soiled white, with waxed black mustaches and a carefully oiled curl plastered against one side of his forehead.
He had invented a machine for the cleaning of the hemp, which, considering the education and circumstances of the inventor, displayed quite as much mechanical genius as Whitney's cotton-gin.
No man with a genius for legislation has appeared in America.
I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks--who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre," to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, "There goes a Sainte-Terrer," a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander.