genizah


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ge·ni·zah

also ge·ni·za (gə-nē′zä′, gə-nē′zə)
n. pl. ge·ni·zoth (-nē′zōth′) or ge·ni·zot (-nē′zōt′, -nē′zōs′) also ge·ni·zahs or ge·ni·zas
A repository in a synagogue where worn-out or desecrated sacred texts or objects are stored.

[Medieval Hebrew gənîzâ, from Mishnaic Hebrew, hiding, storage, verbal noun of gānaz, to hide, from Aramaic gənaz, denominative verb from Aramaic ginzā, ganzā, treasure, treasury, of Iranian origin; akin to Middle Persian ganǰ, treasure.]

genizah

(ɡɛˈniːzə)
n, pl genizahs or genizoth (ɡɛˈniːzəθ)
(Judaism) Judaism a repository (usually in a synagogue) for books and other sacred objects which can no longer be used but which may not be destroyed
[C19: from Hebrew, literally: a hiding place, from gānaz to hide, set aside]
References in periodicals archive ?
These purposes included carrying special leaves on the person and employing it in accordance with religious practices like the mezuzah or genizah (literally, to hide, to put away), a repository that held illegible, obsolete, or fragmentary Hebrew books and documents of religious and sometimes nonreligious content.
In some of the texts it was possible to prove the tripartite structure based on comparisons between Genizah fragments or binding fragments, alternative versions provided by early and later commentators to the printed version, or by using comparisons between the printed version and parallel sources of the Babylonian Talmud and Yerushalmi Talmud, the literature of the Geonim, etc.
New data has emerged for the existence of precisely this kind of technical knowledge transfer from Babylonia to Palestine, in the form of a unique Cairo Genizah lunar-omen text (Bohak and Geller 2013), which closely parallels 4Q318, the Qumran "brontologion" referred to many times in the present volume (see p.
This is life in Cairo between the 10th and 13th centuries, captured in 193,000 scraps of paper found in an ancient storeroom, a genizah, in which tradition demanded that discarded writings were to be hidden away.
A genizah is an area in a synagogue or Jewish cemetery where sacred texts that are in disuse are stored.
Stem corrected the reading found in Hartwig Hirschfeld's edition ("Arabic Portion of the Cairo Genizah at Cambridge," Jewish Quarterly Review 15 [1902-03]: 690), which was tahillu fi-l-asya, to the reading that we have given above.
Two of Horn's four novels have been historical fiction, including her latest work, A Guide for the Perplexed, which brings to life Solomon Schechter, the Cambridge professor who discovered the medieval archive hidden in the genizah of a Cairo synagogue.
Stefan Reif of the University of Cambridge, who exposed Cairo Genizah and its discoveries to the world, told Ynet about the revolution it created in the perception of Judaism.
This is the Hebrew text of the Cairo Genizah, but the Septuagint and Vulgate attribute the destruction in the second part of the verse to "His angel.
A Guide for the Perplexed provides a fine novel centered around software developer and businesswoman Josie, who has created the Genizah program - a digital archive that gathers and organizes every moment of people's lives in the world's biggest virtual storage effort.
A Guide for the Perplexed provides a fine novel centered around software developer and businesswoman Josie, who has created the Genizah program--a digital archive that gathers and organizes every moment of people's lives in the world's biggest virtual storage effort.
Holy books in such a decrepit state should be buried in a genizah, rather than used or abandoned.