gentlefolk


Also found in: Thesaurus.

gen·tle·folk

 (jĕn′tl-fōk′) also gen·tle·folks (-fōks′)
pl.n.
Persons of good family and relatively high station.

gentlefolk

(ˈdʒɛntəlˌfəʊk) or

gentlefolks

pl n
people regarded as being of good breeding

gen•tle•folk

(ˈdʒɛn tlˌfoʊk)

also gen′tle•folks`,



n.pl.
persons of good family and breeding.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gentlefolk - people of good family and breeding and high social status
common people, folk, folks - people in general (often used in the plural); "they're just country folk"; "folks around here drink moonshine"; "the common people determine the group character and preserve its customs from one generation to the next"
Translations

gentlefolk

pl (dated)vornehme or feine Leute pl
References in classic literature ?
They are, in short, peasants, plain homely people, without any taint of disreputable blood, and, as the saying is, old rusty Christians, but so rich that by their wealth and free-handed way of life they are coming by degrees to be considered gentlefolk by birth, and even by position; though the wealth and nobility they thought most of was having me for their daughter; and as they have no other child to make their heir, and are affectionate parents, I was one of the most indulged daughters that ever parents indulged.
And there were gentlefolk around it, and other gentlefolk sitting down.
We've been found to be the greatest gentlefolk in the whole county--reaching all back long before Oliver Grumble's time--to the days of the Pagan Turks--with monuments, and vaults, and crests, and "scutcheons, and the Lord knows what all.
He should not forget, they said, that his father and mother were gentlefolk, and painting wasn't a serious profession; it was Bohemian, disreputable, immoral.
The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
In ways so delicate that the most sensitive pride could not resent the favor, these true gentlefolk showed Polly their respect and regard, put many pleasures in her way, and when they paid her for her work, gave her also the hearty thanks that takes away all sense of degradation even from the humblest service, for money so earned and paid sweetens the daily bread it buys, and makes the mutual obligation a mutual benefit and pleasure.
This story deals with gentlefolk, or with those who are obliged to pretend that they are gentlefolk.
In fact, the only reason why this is not the case still is that gentlefolk and farmers have taken to other amusements, and have, as usual, forgotten the poor.
It is because, as I said before, gentlefolk and farmers have left off joining or taking an interest in them.
Then it came in upon my mind that this was all his sorrow at my departure; and my conscience smote me hard and fast, because I, for my part, was overjoyed to get away out of that quiet country-side, and go to a great, busy house, among rich and respected gentlefolk of my own name and blood.
The handsome old man, with black grizzled beard and thick silvery hair, stood motionless, holding a cup of honey, looking down from the height of his tall figure with friendly serenity at the gentlefolk, obviously understanding nothing of their conversation and not caring to understand it.
And as likely as not she belongs to gentlefolk too, poor ones maybe.