gentleperson

gen·tle·per·son

 (jĕn′tl-pûr′sən)
n.
A person of gentle or noble birth or superior social position; a lady or a gentleman.

gentleperson

(ˈdʒɛntəlˌpɜːsən)
n
a lady or gentleman; a person of good breeding

gen•tle•per•son

(ˈdʒɛn tlˌpɜr sən)

n.
a person of good family and position; gentleman or lady.
[1970–75]
usage: See -person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tom Neuwirth, to give this gentleperson his birth name, chose his alter ego's title well.
Among the succession of these screeds against "this hypertext nonsense," as the gentleperson from Bayonne termed it in that first letter, it came to be a commonplace to talk about "Robert Coover's hypertexts" as well, a phrase brandished by defenders and critics alike.
To the Confucian gentleperson, to be capable, one must study; to be intellectual, one must learn from others (Zhou, 2005: 36), profiting by good examples and avoiding bad examples.
How buff (sexy) is that for the young gentleperson who gets lucky at a party?
I continue to invite questions from our gentleperson farmers out there, and that includes our cat and dog lovers too
It is an absolute classic example of its type and somebody is living the life of the Roman gentleperson," said Durham University project manager Richard Annis.
The nimble fingers, sharp chisels and fine files of this skilled craftsman produced -- just as Jacob Kunz might have finished in 1815 -- an exquisite pair of pistols for a gentleperson of refined taste.
At motorway speeds you get a bit windblown with the wafer-thin screen, but taller gentlepersons who want to keep their moustache in perfect order, especially men, may opt for the optional 5.
org The Six Gentlepersons Of Verona, adapt: Scott Palmer from Shakespeare; dir: Scott Palmer.
The ostensible purpose of the narrative is to cast the Priests (and, by extension, their real-life surrogate the Falkners) as aristocrats and gentlepersons.