gentry


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gen·try

 (jĕn′trē)
n. pl. gen·tries
1. People of gentle birth, good breeding, or high social position.
2.
a. An upper or ruling class.
b. The class of English landowners ranking just below the nobility.
3. People of a particular class or group: another commuter from the suburban gentry.

[Middle English gentri, nobility of birth, from Old French genterie, variant of genterise, gentilise, from gentil, noble; see gentle.]

gentry

(ˈdʒɛntrɪ)
n
1. persons of high birth or social standing; aristocracy
2. Brit persons just below the nobility in social rank
3. informal often derogatory people, esp of a particular group or kind
[C14: from Old French genterie, from gentil gentle]

gen•try

(ˈdʒɛn tri)

n.
1. wellborn and well-bred people.
2. (in England) the class below the nobility.
3. an upper or ruling class; aristocracy.
4. people, esp. considered as a specific group, class, or kind; folks: the hockey gentry.
5. Archaic. the quality or status of being a gentleman.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old French genterie. See gentle, -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gentry - the most powerful members of a societygentry - the most powerful members of a society
upper class, upper crust - the class occupying the highest position in the social hierarchy
landed gentry, squirearchy - the gentry who own land (considered as a class)

gentry

noun nobility, lords, elite, nobles, upper class, aristocracy, peerage, ruling class, patricians, upper crust (informal), gentility, gentlefolk Most of the country estates were built by the landed gentry during the 19th century.

gentry

noun
Translations

gentry

[ˈdʒentrɪ] N (Brit) → alta burguesía f, pequeña aristocracia f (pej) → familias fpl bien, gente f bien; (= set of people) → gente f

gentry

[ˈdʒɛntri] ngentry f

gentry

pl
Gentry f, → niederer Adel
(dated pej: = people) → Leute pl

gentry

[ˈdʒɛntrɪ] nplpiccola nobiltà
References in classic literature ?
You know how quick some of the gentry are to suspect us of cheating and overcharging; why, they stand with their purses in their hands counting it over to a penny and looking at us as if we were pickpockets.
which is to say, they were the nation, the actual Nation; they were about all of it that was useful, or worth sav- ing, or really respect-worthy, and to subtract them would have been to subtract the Nation and leave behind some dregs, some refuse, in the shape of a king, nobility and gentry, idle, unproductive, acquainted mainly with the arts of wasting and destroying, and of no sort of use or value in any rationally constructed world.
Well, you know Missis always said they were poor and quite despicable: and they may be poor; but I believe they are as much gentry as the Reeds are; for one day, nearly seven years ago, a Mr.
Th' gentry calls him a athlete and I thought o' thee, Mester Colin, and I says, `How did tha' make tha' muscles stick out that way, Bob?
Trabb then bent over number four, and in a sort of deferential confidence recommended it to me as a light article for summer wear, an article much in vogue among the nobility and gentry, an article that it would ever be an honour to him to reflect upon a distinguished fellow-townsman's (if he might claim me for a fellow-townsman) having worn.
The Squire had been used to parish homage all his life, used to the presupposition that his family, his tankards, and everything that was his, were the oldest and best; and as he never associated with any gentry higher than himself, his opinion was not disturbed by comparison.
The situation of the inferior gentry, or Franklins, as they were called, who, by the law and spirit of the English constitution, were entitled to hold themselves independent of feudal tyranny, became now unusually precarious.
The man drank a mouthful humbly, and Smilash continued, "Here's to the glorious landed gentry of old England: bless 'em
And it must be confessed, that from the great intercourse of trade and commerce between both realms, from the continual reception of exiles which is mutual among them, and from the custom, in each empire, to send their young nobility and richer gentry to the other, in order to polish themselves by seeing the world, and understanding men and manners; there are few persons of distinction, or merchants, or seamen, who dwell in the maritime parts, but what can hold conversation in both tongues; as I found some weeks after, when I went to pay my respects to the emperor of Blefuscu, which, in the midst of great misfortunes, through the malice of my enemies, proved a very happy adventure to me, as I shall relate in its proper place.
These tender-hearted gentry should consider that it's not merely a squire, but a governor they are asking to whip himself; just as if it was 'drink with cherries.
All the gentry and populace of the surrounding country were gathered there in eager expectancy.
Besides, we are patriotic; we want to help France in getting back her money from the pockets of those gentry.