gentry


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gen·try

 (jĕn′trē)
n. pl. gen·tries
1. People of gentle birth, good breeding, or high social position.
2.
a. An upper or ruling class.
b. The class of English landowners ranking just below the nobility.
3. People of a particular class or group: another commuter from the suburban gentry.

[Middle English gentri, nobility of birth, from Old French genterie, variant of genterise, gentilise, from gentil, noble; see gentle.]

gentry

(ˈdʒɛntrɪ)
n
1. persons of high birth or social standing; aristocracy
2. Brit persons just below the nobility in social rank
3. informal often derogatory people, esp of a particular group or kind
[C14: from Old French genterie, from gentil gentle]

gen•try

(ˈdʒɛn tri)

n.
1. wellborn and well-bred people.
2. (in England) the class below the nobility.
3. an upper or ruling class; aristocracy.
4. people, esp. considered as a specific group, class, or kind; folks: the hockey gentry.
5. Archaic. the quality or status of being a gentleman.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old French genterie. See gentle, -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gentry - the most powerful members of a societygentry - the most powerful members of a society
upper class, upper crust - the class occupying the highest position in the social hierarchy
landed gentry, squirearchy - the gentry who own land (considered as a class)

gentry

noun nobility, lords, elite, nobles, upper class, aristocracy, peerage, ruling class, patricians, upper crust (informal), gentility, gentlefolk Most of the country estates were built by the landed gentry during the 19th century.

gentry

noun
Translations

gentry

[ˈdʒentrɪ] N (Brit) → alta burguesía f, pequeña aristocracia f (pej) → familias fpl bien, gente f bien; (= set of people) → gente f

gentry

[ˈdʒɛntri] ngentry f

gentry

pl
Gentry f, → niederer Adel
(dated pej: = people) → Leute pl

gentry

[ˈdʒɛntrɪ] nplpiccola nobiltà
References in classic literature ?
Yes, upon my truly was it," says she: "the gentleman speaks very much like a gentleman, and I see very plainly is so; and to be certain the house is well known to be a house of as good reputation as any on the road, and though I say it, is frequented by gentry of the best quality, both Irish and English.
The parsonage here's a tumble-down place, sir, not fit for gentry to live in.
To acknowledge the kindness with which it has been received in all the principal towns of England through which the Show has passed, and where it has been most favourably noticed by the respected conductors of the public Press, and by the Nobility and Gentry.
Mr Willet, who appeared to entertain strong doubts whether a customer in a laced coat and fine linen could be supposed to have any acquaintance even with the existence of such unpolite gentry as the bird claimed to belong to, took Barnaby off at this juncture, with the view of preventing any other improper declarations, and quitted the room with his very best bow.
Nell said 'indeed' in a tone which might imply, either that she was reasonably surprised to find the genuine and only Jarley, who was the delight of the Nobility and Gentry and the peculiar pet of the Royal Family, destitute of these familiar arts; or that she presumed so great a lady could scarcely stand in need of such ordinary accomplishments.
Since then, pursuing its modest course, it had given to the sons of the local gentry and of the professional people of Kent an education sufficient to their needs.
They had built a sort of grand stand for the nobility and gentry, and these were there in full force, with their ladies.
The people in it are landed gentry, and they will begin to ask me questions, and to busy themselves about me.
She was to make her debut on the third of January, at a magnificent ball, which her mamma proposed to give to all the nobility and choice gentry of O and its neighbourhood for twenty miles round.
Do you talk in that familiar manner of one of the landed gentry of England?
You know how quick some of the gentry are to suspect us of cheating and overcharging; why, they stand with their purses in their hands counting it over to a penny and looking at us as if we were pickpockets.
The good he has done to everybody here, from his peasants up to the gentry, is incalculable.