genus


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ge·nus

 (jē′nəs)
n. pl. gen·er·a (jĕn′ər-ə)
1. Biology A taxonomic category ranking below a family and above a species and designating a group of species that are presumed to be closely related and usually exhibit similar characteristics. In a scientific name, the genus name is capitalized and italicized, for example,Ovis for sheep and related animals.
2. Logic A class of objects divided into subordinate species having certain common attributes.
3. A class, group, or kind with common attributes.

[Latin, kind; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

genus

(ˈdʒiːnəs)
n, pl genera (ˈdʒɛnərə) or genuses
1. (Biology) biology any of the taxonomic groups into which a family is divided and which contains one or more species. For example, Vulpes (foxes) is a genus of the dog family (Canidae)
2. (Logic) logic a class of objects or individuals that can be divided into two or more groups or species
3. a class, group, etc, with common characteristics
4. (Mathematics) maths a number characterizing a closed surface in topology equal to the number of handles added to a sphere to form the surface. A sphere has genus 0, a torus, genus 1, etc
[C16: from Latin: race]

ge•nus

(ˈdʒi nəs)

n., pl. gen•e•ra (ˈdʒɛn ər ə)
ge•nus•es.
1. the usual major subdivision of a biological family or subfamily in the classification of organisms, usu. consisting of more than one species.
2. Logic. a class or group of individuals, or of species of individuals.
3. a kind; sort; class.
[1545–55; < Latin: race, stock, kind, gender, c. Greek génos]

ge·nus

(jē′nəs)
Plural genera (jĕn′ər-ə)
A group of organisms ranking above a species and below a family. See Table at taxonomy.

Genus

 a class, order, or type of thing, esp. of plants or animals.

genus

A group of closely related species.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genus - a general kind of something; "ignore the genus communism"
kind, sort, form, variety - a category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality; "sculpture is a form of art"; "what kinds of desserts are there?"
2.genus - (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more species
form genus - an artificial taxonomic category established on the basis of morphological resemblance for organisms of obscure true relationships especially fossil forms
bacteria genus - a genus of bacteria
protoctist genus - any genus of Protoctista
fish genus - any of various genus of fish
chordate genus - any genus in the phylum Chordata
bird genus - a genus of birds
amphibian genus - any genus of amphibians
reptile genus - a genus of reptiles
arthropod genus - a genus of arthropods
mammal genus - a genus of mammals
sponge genus - a genus of Porifera
coelenterate genus - a genus of coelenterates
ctenophore genus - a genus of ctenophores
worm genus - a genus of worms
mollusk genus - a genus of mollusks
echinoderm genus - a genus of echinoderms
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
taxon, taxonomic category, taxonomic group - animal or plant group having natural relations
family - (biology) a taxonomic group containing one or more genera; "sharks belong to the fish family"
subgenus - (biology) taxonomic group between a genus and a species
type genus - (biology) genus from which the name of a family or subfamily is formed; it is not necessarily the most representative genus but often the largest or best known or earliest described
form genus - (biology) an artificial taxonomic category for organisms of which the true relationships are obscure
species - (biology) taxonomic group whose members can interbreed
moss genus - a genus of mosses
gymnosperm genus - a genus of gymnosperms
liliopsid genus, monocot genus - genus of flowering plants having a single cotyledon (embryonic leaf) in the seed
dicot genus, magnoliopsid genus - genus of flowering plants having two cotyledons (embryonic leaves) in the seed which usually appear at germination
fungus genus - includes lichen genera
plant genus - a genus of plants
fern genus - genera of ferns and fern allies

genus

noun type, sort, kind, group, set, order, race, class, breed, category, genre, classification all the species of a particular genus
Translations
rod
genro
suku
nemzetség
släkte

genus

[ˈdʒenəs] N (genera or genuses (pl)) (Bio) → género m

genus

[ˈdʒiːnəs] [genera] [ˈdʒɛnərə] (pl) ngenre m

genus

n pl <genera> (Biol) → Gattung f

genus

[ˈdʒɛnəs] n (genera (pl)) [ˈdʒɛnərə]genere m

ge·nus

n. género, categoría perteneciente a una clasificación biológica.
References in classic literature ?
Take as an instance the genus 'animal' and the genus 'knowledge'.
But where one genus is subordinate to another, there is nothing to prevent their having the same differentiae: for the greater class is predicated of the lesser, so that all the differentiae of the predicate will be differentiae also of the subject.
Metaphor is the application of an alien name by transference either from genus to species, or from species to genus, or from species to species, or by analogy, that is, proportion Thus from genus to species, as: 'There lies my ship'; for lying at anchor is a species of lying.
I also frequently observed in the lagoon near the Botanic Garden, where the water is only a little less salt than in the sea, a species of hydrophilus, very similar to a water-beetle common in the ditches of England: in the same lake the only shell belonged to a genus generally found in estuaries.
The existence of a division of the genus Planaria, which inhabits the dry land, interested me much.
A small frog, of the genus Hyla, sits on a blade of grass about an inch above the surface of the water, and sends forth a pleasing chirp: when several are together they sing in harmony on different notes.
It is remarkable that in all the different kinds of glowworms, shining elaters, and various marine animals (such as the crustacea, medusae, nereidae, a coralline of the genus Clytia, and Pyrosma), which I have observed, the light has been of a well-marked green colour.
I was much interested one day by watching a deadly contest between a Pepsis and a large spider of the genus Lycosa.
Bears on natural selection -- The term used in a wide sense -- Geometrical powers of increase -- Rapid increase of naturalised animals and plants -- Nature of the checks to increase -- Competition universal -- Effects of climate -- Protection from the number of individuals -- Complex relations of all animals and plants throughout nature -- Struggle for life most severe between individuals and varieties of the same species; often severe between species of the same genus -- The relation of organism to organism the most important of all relations.
How do those groups of species, which constitute what are called distinct genera, and which differ from each other more than do the species of the same genus, arise?
Hence I have very little doubt, that if the whole genus of humble-bees became extinct or very rare in England, the heartsease and red clover would become very rare, or wholly disappear.
As species of the same genus have usually, though by no means invariably, some similarity in habits and constitution, and always in structure, the struggle will generally be more severe between species of the same genus, when they come into competition with each other, than between species of distinct genera.