geography


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Related to geography: physical geography

ge·og·ra·phy

 (jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. ge·og·ra·phies
1. The study of the earth and its features and of the distribution of life on the earth, including human life and the effects of human activity.
2. The physical characteristics, especially the surface features, of an area.
3. A book on geography.
4. An ordered arrangement of constituent elements: charting a geography of the mind.

[Latin geōgraphia, from Greek geōgraphiā : geō-, geo- + -graphiā, -graphy.]

ge·og′ra·pher n.

geography

(dʒɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Physical Geography) the study of the natural features of the earth's surface, including topography, climate, soil, vegetation, etc, and man's response to them
2. (Physical Geography) the natural features of a region
3. an arrangement of constituent parts; plan; layout
geˈographer n
geographical, ˌgeoˈgraphic adj
ˌgeoˈgraphically adv

ge•og•ra•phy

(dʒiˈɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the science dealing with the areal differentiation of the earth's surface, as shown in the character, arrangement, and interrelations of such elements as climate, elevation, vegetation, population, and land use.
2. the topographical features of a given region.
3. a book dealing with geographical science or study, as a textbook.
4. the arrangement of features of any complex entity: the geography of the mind.
[1535–45; < Latin geōgraphia < Greek geōgraphía earth description. See geo-, -graphy]

ge·og·ra·phy

(jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
The scientific study of the Earth's surface and its various climates, countries, peoples, and natural resources.

Geography

See also earth; equator; land; maps.

the scientific study of man’s geographical distribution and his relationship with his environment.
the complement of latitude; the difference between any given latitude and 90°.
1. a book of place names, sometimes with additional information, arranged alphabetically.
2. an index to an atlas.
1. the science that studies and describes the surface of the earth and its physical, biological, political, economie, and demographic characteristics and the complex interrelations among them.
2. the topographical features of a specific area.
3. a book on this subject. — geographer, n.geographic, geographical, adj.
the study of the characteristics, origins, and development of land forms. — geomorphologist, n.geomorphologic, geomorphological, adj.
1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
the branch of geography that studies land areas above sea level to measure and map them. — hypsographic, hypsographical, adj.
the science or study of islands. — islandologist, n.
a rhumb line or curve on the surface of a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle; hence, the course of a ship or aircraft following a constant compass direction. — loxodromic, adj.
an instrument for determining longitude by observation of the stars.
1. a great circle that passes through the earth’s poles and any other given point on the earth’s surface.
2. half of such a circle.
3. any line of longitude running north and south on a map. See also astronomy. — meridian, meridional, adj.
the branch of physical geography that studies mountains and mountain systems. — orographic, orographical, adj.
the branch of geography that studies the features of the earth of past geologie times. — paleogeographer, palaeogeographer, n.paleogeographic, palaeogeographic, paleogeographical, palaeogeographical, adj.
1. physical geography.
2. geomorphology. See also classification. — physiographer, n.physiographic, physiographical, adj.
a branch of physical geography that studies wet lands, as marshes or swamps.
the study of geographical variation and distribution of temperature. — thermogeographical, adj.
1. the art or technique of preparing charts or maps of a specified area.
2. the physical features of an area. — topographic, topographical, adj.
the study of the physical features of a specific place or area, usually accompanied by maps or charts showing relationships and elevations. — topologist, n.topologic, topological, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geography - study of the earth's surfacegeography - study of the earth's surface; includes people's responses to topography and climate and soil and vegetation
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
physical geography, physiography - the study of physical features of the earth's surface
topography - precise detailed study of the surface features of a region
economic geography - the branch of geography concerned with the production and distribution of commodities

geography

noun

Geography

Branches of geography  biogeography, cartography, chorography, chorology, climatology, demography, geology, geomorphology, glaciology, hydrology, human geography, meteorology, oceanography, oceanology, orography or orology, pedology, physical geography, political geography or geopolitics, seismology, topography, vulcanology
Geography terms and features  afforestation, antipodes, arête, atlas, atmosphere, atoll, basin, bay, beach, canyon, cliff, climate, col, conservation, continent, continental drift, continental shelf, contour, conurbation, coombe, coral reef, core, corrie, cirque, or cwm, crag, crater, crevasse, crust, culvert, deforestation, delta, desert, desertification, dormitory, dyke, earthquake, eastings, environment, epicentre, equator, erosion, escarpment, estuary, fault, fell, fjord, flood plain, glaciation, glacier, glade, glen, global warming, green belt, greenhouse effect, grid reference, hanging valley, headland, ice cap, infrastructure, International Date Line, irrigation, isobar, isobath, isohyet, isotherm, isthmus, jungle, lagoon, latitude, levée, loch, longitude, longshore drift, mantle, map, meander, Mercator projection, moraine, new town, northern hemisphere, northings, North Pole, occidental, ocean, Ordnance Survey, oriental, ozone layer, permafrost, plate tectonics, pollution, precipitation, rainforest, rain shadow, reef, relief map, ridge, rift valley, rill, river basin, rivulet, salt flat, salt lake, sandbank, sand bar, sand dune, savanna or savannah, scree, sierra, snow line, southern hemisphere, South Pole, spit, spring, spur, stack, steppe, subsoil, suburb, tarn, temperate, Third World, topsoil, tor, tropics, tsunami, tundra, urbanization, veld or veldt, volcano, wadi, watercourse, water cycle, waterfall, watershed, water table, weathering, wetland, whirlpool
Geographers  Richard Hakluyt (English), Sir Halford John Mackinder (British), Gerardus Mercator (Gerhard Kremer) (Flemish), Pausanias (Greek), Ptolemy (Greek), Mary Somerville (British), Strabo (Greek)
Translations
geografie
جُغْرافياجُغْرَافيا
география
geografiezeměpis
geografi
geografio
maantiedemaantieto
zemljopisgeografija
földrajz
geografi
landafræðilandafræîi
地理学
지리학
geographia
geografijageografinisgeografiškaigeografas
ģeogrāfija
geografie
zemepis
geografijazemljepis
geografi
jiografia
ภูมิศาสตร์
географія
địa lý

geography

[dʒɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Ngeografía f
policemen who knew the local geographypolicías que conocían bien el lugar

geography

[dʒiˈɒgrəfi] ngéographie f
to know the local geography (= locality) → bien connaître les environs

geography

nGeografie f; (Sch also) → Erdkunde f; policemen who knew the local geographyPolizisten, die sich vor Ort auskannten

geography

[dʒɪˈɒgrəfɪ] ngeografia

geography

(dʒiˈogrəfi) noun
the science that describes the surface of the Earth and its inhabitants. He is studying geography.
geˈographer noun
a person who studies geography.
geographic(al) (dʒiəˈgrӕfik(əl)) adjective
a geographical study of the area.
ˌgeoˈgraphically adverb

geography

جُغْرَافيا geografie geografi Geographie γεωγραφία geografía maantiede géographie zemljopis geografia 地理学 지리학 geografie geografi geografia geografia география geografi ภูมิศาสตร์ coğrafya địa lý 地理学
References in classic literature ?
A fact I learned from the article and not because I remembered my geography.
One was a map of the Pyncheon territory at the eastward, not engraved, but the handiwork of some skilful old draughtsman, and grotesquely illuminated with pictures of Indians and wild beasts, among which was seen a lion; the natural history of the region being as little known as its geography, which was put down most fantastically awry.
We were on the edge of the lake, and, as we had lately begun geography, the lake was the Sea of Azof.
One of the other porters at Hinds's was a sharp little Irishman, who knew everything that Jurgis wanted to know; and while they were busy he would explain to him the geography of America, and its history, its constitution and its laws; also he gave him an idea of the business system of the country, the great railroads and corporations, and who owned them, and the labor unions, and the big strikes, and the men who had led them.
That the common people should be rather foggy in their geography, and foggy as to the location of the Indians, is a matter for amusement, maybe, but not of surprise.
In turn he took his place in the reading class and made a botch of it; then in the geography class and turned lakes into mountains, mountains into rivers, and rivers into continents, till chaos was come again; then in the spelling class, and got "turned down," by a succession of mere baby words, till he brought up at the foot and yielded up the pewter medal which he had worn with ostentation for months.
It's in my geography, and it says: `The French are a gay and polite people, fond of dancing and light wines.
But neither geography nor tranquillity could come all at once, and Emma was now in a humour to resolve that they should both come in time.
It looked rather spongy and soppy, I thought, as I carried my eye over the great dull waste that lay across the river; and I could not help wondering, if the world were really as round as my geography book said, how any part of it came to be so flat.
That bird knew more geography than people will ever know.
However, the Multiplication Table doesn't signify: let's try Geography.
I also learnt history, and was instructed in poetry, versification, geography, chronology, and in all the outdoor exercises in which every prince should excel.

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