geological


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ge·ol·o·gy

 (jē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ge·ol·o·gies
1. The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the earth.
2. The structure of a specific region of the earth's crust.
3. A book on geology.
4. The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the solid matter of a celestial body.

[Medieval Latin geōlogia, study of earthly things : Greek geō-, geo- + Greek -logiā, -logy.]

ge′o·log′ic (jē′ə-lŏj′ĭk), ge′o·log′i·cal adj.
ge′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ge·ol′o·gist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.geological - of or relating to or based on geology; "geological formations"; "geologic forces"
Translations
جيولوجي
gelogický
geologisk
geológiai
jarîfræîilegur
geologický
jeolojik

geological

[dʒɪəʊˈlɒdʒɪkəl] ADJgeológico

geological

[ˌdʒiːəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] adj [feature, survey] → géologique

geological

adj, geologically
advgeologisch

geological

[dʒɪəʊˈlɒdʒɪkl] adjgeologico/a

geology

(dʒiˈolədʒi) noun
the science of the history and development of the Earth as shown by rocks etc. He is studying geology.
geological (dʒiəˈlodʒikəl) adjective
a geological survey.
ˌgeoˈlogically adverb
geˈologist noun
References in classic literature ?
Beagle,' as naturalist, I was much struck with certain facts in the distribution of the inhabitants of South America, and in the geological relations of the present to the past inhabitants of that continent.
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.
Nor could you wonder had you witnessed a recent experience of mine when, in the armor of blissful and stupendous ignorance, I gaily narrated the gist of it to a Fellow of the Royal Geological Society on the occasion of my last trip to London.
But I believe the story, and so would you, and so would the learned Fellow of the Royal Geological Society, had you and he heard it from the lips of the man who told it to me.
Likewise, by way of preliminary, I desire to remind the reader, that while in the earlier geological strata there are found the fossils of monsters now almost completely extinct; the subsequent relics discovered in what are called the Tertiary formations seem the connecting, or at any rate intercepted links, between the antichronical creatures, and those whose remote posterity are said to have entered the Ark; all the Fossil Whales hitherto discovered belong to the Tertiary period, which is the last preceding the superficial formations.
So Owen rechristened the monster Zeuglodon; and in his paper read before the London Geological Society, pronounced it, in substance, one of the most extraordinary creatures which the mutations of the globe have blotted out of existence.
The Americans, among others, hoped one day or other to determine this geological question.
He took his rifle or his fowling-piece with him in his geological researches, conformed to the hardy and rugged habits of the men around him, and of course gained favor in their eyes.
What geological phenomenon had designed these ardent beams?
The geological formation of that portion of the American Union, which lies between the Alleghanies and the Rocky Mountains, has given rise to many ingenious theories.
I will add," I continued, "that a similar barrier exists between Gibraltar and Ceuta, which in geological times formed the entire Mediterranean.
It will help us to bring to our aid such geological truth as we may have between us.