geomagnetic storm


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geomagnetic storm

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A moderate geomagnetic storm meant that the natural phenomenon was visible across parts of the UK on Tuesday night and may appear in our region again thanks to strong solar winds.
A strong geomagnetic storm was behind this week's particularly stunning show.
The present study was based upon the observation that geomagnetic storm conditions influenced microvolt fluctuations within coronal sections of fixed human brain tissue.
The strongest part of the geomagnetic storm has passed and it probably won't be as strong on Monday night, so the main places to see aurora will be in north Scotland," Ms Townsend said.
Forecasts predicted a geomagnetic storm would hit Earth that night and potentially create beautiful aurora.
But no geomagnetic storm resulted and we didn't see any bright aurora - space weather is as hard to predict as our weather.
The impressive natural phenomenon, which occurs when particles from the sun spark a geomagnetic storm around the Earth, is only occasionally visible across the UK.
The gap in the Sun's magnetic field lets out a stream of particles travelling at up to 800 kilometres per second, kindling a days-long geomagnetic storm upon hitting Earth, Space.
Therefore, protection against the next large geomagnetic storm is the topic being addressed by a number of respected scientists.
Terrorism, a quick-striking geomagnetic storm or an electromagnetic pulse could disable the grid for weeks or months, potentially creating a civilization-altering event disrupting the infrastructure of modern life.
Forecasters at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center say a strong geomagnetic storm pulse is likely to reach the Earth on Thursday and Friday Jan.
19 in Nature, lead author Richard Thorne, a distinguished professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences in the UCLA College of Letters and Science, and his colleagues report on high-resolution satellite measurements of high-energy electrons during a geomagnetic storm on Oct.