geometric progression


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geometric progression

n.
A sequence, such as the numbers 1, 3, 9, 27, 81, in which each term is multiplied by the same factor in order to obtain the following term. Also called geometric sequence.

geometric progression

n
(Mathematics) a sequence of numbers, each of which differs from the succeeding one by a constant ratio, as 1, 2, 4, 8, …. Compare arithmetic progression

geomet′ric progres′sion



n.
a sequence of terms in which the ratio between any two successive terms is the same, as the progression 1, 3, 9, 27, 81 or 144, 12, 1, 1/12, 1/144. Also called geometric series.

ge·o·met·ric progression

(jē′ə-mĕt′rĭk)
A sequence of numbers in which each number is multiplied by the same factor to obtain the next number in the sequence; a sequence in which the ratio of any two adjacent numbers is the same. An example is 5, 25, 125, 625, ... , where each number is multiplied by 5 to obtain the following number, and the ratio of any number to the next number is always 1 to 5. Compare arithmetic progression.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geometric progression - (mathematics) a progression in which each term is multiplied by a constant in order to obtain the next term; "1-4-16-64-256- is the start of a geometric progression"
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
patterned advance, progression - a series with a definite pattern of advance
Translations

geometric progression

nprogressione f geometrica
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the basic circuit of negative converter in which the output voltage increases in geometric progression.
That is OK for the past, OK for now, but if you wish to go 10+ years forward, and try to understand geometric progression and sustained compounded annual growth rates, you will realise the difference and why speakers in each conference and summit are betting on the East for recovery and solace to the West.
As increasingly more land was traded, landowner expectations for what they could squeeze out of their holdings in terms of price followed a geometric progression model, pushing prices to unreasonable levels.
Now if z > 1/2, then from (3) and the properties of the geometric progression we know that f(z, 3) is convergent.