geosyncline

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ge·o·syn·cline

 (jē′ō-sĭn′klīn′)
n.
A usually elongate, basinlike depression along the edge of a continent, in which a thick sequence of sediments and volcanic deposits has accumulated.

ge′o·syn·cli′nal (-sĭn-klĭ′nəl) adj.

geosyncline

(ˌdʒiːəʊˈsɪŋklaɪn)
n
(Geological Science) a broad elongated depression in the earth's crust containing great thicknesses of sediment
ˌgeosynˈclinal adj

ge•o•syn•cline

(ˌdʒi oʊˈsɪn klaɪn)

n.
a portion of the earth's crust subjected to downward warping during a large span of geologic time.
[1890–95]
ge`o•syn•cli′nal, adj.
Translations

geosyncline

[ˌdʒiːəʊˈsɪnklaɪn] ngeosinclinale f
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References in periodicals archive ?
1963, Collapsing continental rises: an actualistic concept of geosynclines and mountain building: Journal of Geology, v.
In contrast, Aubouin (1965) proposed that ophiolites were generated through differentiation of gigantic deep extrusions on the seafloor, in the frame of the geosyncline concept, an idea already proposed by Brunn (1959).