geranium

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ge·ra·ni·um

 (jə-rā′nē-əm)
n.
1. Any of various plants of the genus Pelargonium, native chiefly to southern Africa and widely cultivated for their rounded, often variegated leaves and showy clusters of red, pink, or white irregular flowers. An essential oil is obtained from the leaves of some species. Also called pelargonium, storksbill.
2. Any of various plants of the genus Geranium, having palmately divided leaves and pink or purplish regular flowers. Also called cranesbill.
3. A strong to vivid red.

[New Latin Geranium, genus name (under which Linnaeus included both Geranium and Pelargonium, later separated), from Latin geranium, a species of geranium (G. tuberosum), cranesbill (from the appearance of its seed capsule ), from Greek geranion, diminutive of geranos, crane; see gerə- in Indo-European roots.]

geranium

(dʒɪˈreɪnɪəm)
n
1. (Plants) any cultivated geraniaceous plant of the genus Pelargonium, having scarlet, pink, or white showy flowers. See also pelargonium, rose geranium, lemon geranium
2. (Plants) any geraniaceous plant of the genus Geranium, such as cranesbill and herb Robert, having divided leaves and pink or purplish flowers
3. (Colours) a strong red to a moderate or strong pink colour
[C16: from Latin: cranesbill, from Greek geranion, from geranos crane]

ge•ra•ni•um

(dʒɪˈreɪ ni əm)

n.
1. Also called crane's-bill. any plant of the genus Geranium, having usu. pink or purplish flowers.
3. Also called stork's-bill. any plant of the widely cultivated allied S African genus Pelargonium, having showy red, pink, or white flowers and sometimes fragrant leaves.
4. a vivid red color.
[1540–50; < New Latin, for Latin geranion < Greek geránion, derivative of géranos crane]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geranium - any of numerous plants of the family Geraniaceaegeranium - any of numerous plants of the family Geraniaceae
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
family Geraniaceae, Geraniaceae, geranium family - chiefly herbaceous plants
crane's bill, cranesbill - any of numerous geraniums of the genus Geranium
Pelargonium graveolens, rose geranium, sweet-scented geranium - any of several southern African geraniums having fragrant three-lobed to five-lobed leaves and pink flowers
bedding geranium, fish geranium, Pelargonium hortorum, zonal pelargonium - an upright geranium having scalloped leaves with a broad color zone inside the margin and white or pink or red flowers
hanging geranium, ivy geranium, ivy-leaved geranium, Pelargonium peltatum - a commonly cultivated trailing South American plant with peltate leaves and rosy flowers
apple geranium, nutmeg geranium, Pelargonium odoratissimum - geranium with round fragrant leaves and small white flowers
lemon geranium, Pelargonium limoneum - a common garden geranium with lemon-scented foliage
heron's bill, storksbill - any of various plants of the genus Erodium
Translations
muškát
geranium
pelargonia
geranij
ゼラニウム
제라늄
pelargon
ต้นเจอเรเนียมมีดอกสีชมพูหรือสีม่วง
cây phong lữ

geranium

[dʒɪˈreɪnɪəm] Ngeranio m

geranium

[dʒɪˈreɪniəm] ngéranium m

geranium

nGeranie f

geranium

[dʒɪˈreɪnɪəm] ngeranio

geranium

جيرانيوم muškát geranium Geranie γεράνι geranio pelargonia géranium geranij geranio ゼラニウム 제라늄 geranium geranium geranium gerânio герань pelargon ต้นเจอเรเนียมมีดอกสีชมพูหรือสีม่วง sardunya cây phong lữ 天竺葵
References in classic literature ?
Up under the wooden ceiling there were little half-windows with white curtains, and pots of geraniums and wandering Jew in the deep sills.
Huge pomegranate trees, with their glossy leaves and flame-colored flowers, dark-leaved Arabian jessamines, with their silvery stars, geraniums, luxuriant roses bending beneath their heavy abundance of flowers, golden jessamines, lemon-scented verbenum, all united their bloom and fragrance, while here and there a mystic old aloe, with its strange, massive leaves, sat looking like some old enchanter, sitting in weird grandeur among the more perishable bloom and fragrance around it.
On this Friday she buried her face in the blooming geraniums on Miss Maxwell's plant-stand, selected Romola from one of the bookcases, and sank into a seat by the window with a sigh of infinite content, She glanced at the clock now and then, remembering the day on which she had been so immersed in David Copperfield that the Riverboro train had no place in her mind.
This noble entrance, however, in spite of its striking appearance and the graceful effect of the geraniums planted in the two vases, as they waved their variegated leaves in the wind and charmed the eye with their scarlet bloom, had fallen into utter disuse.
To this nest of comforts Fanny now walked down to try its influence on an agitated, doubting spirit, to see if by looking at Edmund's profile she could catch any of his counsel, or by giving air to her geraniums she might inhale a breeze of mental strength herself.
His tortured garden was bright with geraniums and lobelias and polished shells.
The sun slanted through the south window on the girl's moving figure, on the cat dozing in a chair, and on the geraniums brought in from the door-way, where Ethan had planted them in the summer to "make a garden" for Mattie.
Presently she started up, exclaiming that they would be late for breakfast; and they hurried back to the tumble-down house with its pointless porch and unpruned hedge of plumbago and pink geraniums where the Wellands were installed for the winter.
and when the ugly lame old gardener, who I thought had hardly noticed me in all those years, came panting after the coach to give me a little nosegay of geraniums and told me I had been the light of his eyes--indeed the old man said so
Certainly; she is fonder of geraniums, and seems more docile, though not so fine a figure.
Diana Barry, rosy and dimpled, shadowed by the faithful Fred; Jane Andrews, neat and sensible and plain; Ruby Gillis, looking her handsomest and brightest in a cream silk blouse, with red geraniums in her golden hair; Gilbert Blythe and Charlie Sloane, both trying to keep as near the elusive Anne as possible; Carrie Sloane, looking pale and melancholy because, so it was reported, her father would not allow Oliver Kimball to come near the place; Moody Spurgeon MacPherson, whose round face and objectionable ears were as round and objectionable as ever; and Billy Andrews, who sat in a corner all the evening, chuckled when any one spoke to him, and watched Anne Shirley with a grin of pleasure on his broad, freckled countenance.
He almost covered his walls with looking-glasses and crowded his garden with blazing geraniums.