germ theory


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germ theory

n.
The doctrine holding that infectious diseases are caused by the activity of microorganisms within the body.

germ theory

n
1. (Medicine) the theory that all infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms
2. (Biology) the theory that living organisms develop from other living organisms by the growth and differentiation of germ cells

germ′ the`ory


n.
1. the theory that infectious diseases are due to the agency of germs or microorganisms.
2. biogenesis.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.germ theory - (medicine) the theory that all contagious diseases are caused by microorganismsgerm theory - (medicine) the theory that all contagious diseases are caused by microorganisms
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflecting on the history of decline in breast feeding, he said that industrialization in the western world, germ theory and promotion of the formula milk since 1915 has been playing central role in the decline of breast feeding.
Dr Snow's work gave birth to germ theory and epidemiology - the study of diseases in populations, their incidence, distribution, control and other health determinants in populations.
This recognition would not have been possible without one of the greatest accomplishments of the 19th century: the germ theory of disease transmission.
We have germ theory and public health and antibiotic pharmaceuticals at our disposal.
To effectively mitigate our modern social ills, we need to craft a social therapeutic response that is as effective as germ theory has been in addressing biological ones.
She describes physicians who diagnosed health threats in urban environments like New Orleans, Rhode Island, and New York and used smell as a universal sense to build political reform campaigns; practices individuals used for navigating smells in cities; how women dealt with foul odors in homes; places disrupted by the Civil War and how they and widespread disease and death reinforced the idea that bad smells were dangerous; how health boards changed smells in cities, particularly in Chicago and New York City; germ theory, the use of disinfectants, and fresh air; courtrooms created by health boards; and the social and cultural importance of stench after germ theory changed the reaction to odors and people no longer believed they inhaled disease.
The germ theory, for example, was originally proposed in 1546.
Louis Pasteur, the father of microbiology and the germ theory of disease reportedly skewed some of the results of his exhaustive research endeavors to fit the narrative he was proclaiming.
Christian W McMillen pays special attention to the rise of public health and medical research in the wake of pandemics, especially as the germ theory of disease emerged in the late nineteenth century.
She added: From the earliest descriptive maps and water-driven machines to the ancestor of modern clocks and cranes, from lighthouses and theatres to precursors of germ theory and plumbing, from Archimedes mechanical odometers to the very first robot invented by mathematician and scientist Archytas, many aspects of our modern lives can be traced to developments in ancient Greece.
In the same way that antimicrobial agents are the corollary and companion of germ theory, there's every reason to believe that AI is what will enable us to apply our knowledge of "omics" (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, etc) to human health.
He furthers our understanding of the rise of pattern differentiation and disease determination before 1949 through his analysis of how infectious diseases and germ theory impacted Chinese medicine, and how reformers avoided the weak ontological conception of diseases in Chinese medicine.