germanium


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ger·ma·ni·um

 (jər-mā′nē-əm)
n. Symbol Ge
A brittle, crystalline, gray-white metalloid element, widely used as a semiconductor, as an alloying agent and catalyst, and in certain optical glasses. Atomic number 32; atomic weight 72.64; melting point 938.3°C; boiling point 2,833°C; specific gravity 5.323 (at 25°C); valence 2, 4. See Periodic Table.

[After Germania.]

germanium

(dʒɜːˈmeɪnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a brittle crystalline grey element that is a semiconducting metalloid, occurring principally in zinc ores and argyrodite: used in transistors, as a catalyst, and to strengthen and harden alloys. Symbol: Ge; atomic no: 32; atomic wt: 72.61; valency: 2 or 4; relative density: 5.323; melting pt: 938.35°C; boiling pt: 2834°C
[C19: New Latin, named after Germany]

ger•ma•ni•um

(dʒərˈmeɪ ni əm)

n.
a hard, metallic, grayish white element, used chiefly as a semiconductor. Symbol: Ge; at. wt.: 72.59; at. no.: 32; sp. gr.: 5.36 at 20°C.
[1885–90; German (y) + -ium2]

ger·ma·ni·um

(jər-mā′nē-əm)
Symbol Ge A brittle, crystalline, grayish-white nonmetallic element that is found in zinc ores, coal, and other minerals. It is widely used as a semiconductor and in wide-angle lenses. Atomic number 32. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.germanium - a brittle grey crystalline element that is a semiconducting metalloid (resembling silicon) used in transistorsgermanium - a brittle grey crystalline element that is a semiconducting metalloid (resembling silicon) used in transistors; occurs in germanite and argyrodite
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
argyrodite - a rare steel-grey mineral consisting of silver and germanium and sulfur
germanite - a rare reddish-grey mineral consisting of a copper iron germanium sulfide
semiconducting material, semiconductor - a substance as germanium or silicon whose electrical conductivity is intermediate between that of a metal and an insulator; its conductivity increases with temperature and in the presence of impurities
Translations
германий
germanium
germanium
germanio
germaanium
germanium
germanij
germánium
german
ゲルマニウム
germanis
germanium
german
germânio
germaniu
germánium
germanij
germanium
germanyum

germanium

[dʒɜːˈmeɪnɪəm] Ngermanio m

germanium

n (Chem) → Germanium nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Using gold as a catalyst, Sadoh and his colleagues were able to grow germanium crystals at a temperature of about 250 degree Celsius.
Table 5: World Historic Review for Germanium in Fiber Optic
Although Bianconi and Visscher had already made germanium and silicon polymers with tetrahedral linkages - a pyramid-shaped arrangement of atoms they never expected carbon to form that same kind of network.
Bonds between those underlying germanium atoms are less strained and therefore strong enough to resist being snipped free by hydrogen.
The Jazz SBL13 process is the first of its kind in addressing the need in the wireless market for a low-cost Silicon Germanium process at the 0.
Originally used in Japan as a component in electrostatic printer manufacturing in the late 1970's, it has seen growing use for manufacturing silicon-germanium alloy films for both logic and memory integrated circuits where the presence of germanium can alter the mechanical and electronic properties of silicon, producing both stressed and doped layers with enhanced electronic conductivity.
IBM's novel design and use of silicon germanium technology permits a high level of integration in the chips themselves.
The ease of initiation depended on the fiber's germanium concentration.
Germanium is a commodity that is primarily mined and produced by just a handful of relatively large companies worldwide.
In an attempt to settle the question, the California team designed an experiment in which they measured the energy released by beta particles spit out by decaying carbon-14 atoms embedded in a germanium crystal.
The assays from a total of 138 one and one half (1-1/2) meter long horizontal channel samples averaged 339 grams Germanium (Ge); 45 Grams Gallium (Ga); 0.