gerundive


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ge·run·dive

 (jə-rŭn′dĭv)
n.
A verbal adjective in Latin that in the nominative case expresses the notion of fitness or obligation and in other cases functions as a future passive participle.

[Middle English gerundif, from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium, gerund; see gerund.]

gerundive

(dʒɪˈrʌndɪv)
n
(Grammar) (in Latin grammar) an adjective formed from a verb, expressing the desirability of the activity denoted by the verb
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to the gerund or gerundive
[C17: from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium gerund]
gerundival adj
geˈrundively adv

ger•un•dive

(dʒəˈrʌn dɪv)

n.
1. a Latin verbal adjective similar to the gerund in form and expressing the obligation, necessity, or worthiness of the action to be done, as legendus in Liber legendus est “The book is worth reading.”
adj.
2. resembling a gerund.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin gerundīvus. See gerund, -ive]
Translations

gerundive

[dʒəˈrʌndɪv]
A. ADJgerundivo
B. Ngerundio m

gerundive

nGerundivum nt

gerundive

[dʒɪˈrʌndɪv]
1. adjgerundivo/a
2. ngerundivo
References in periodicals archive ?
In Vedic, -ya- is furthermore highly productive as a gerundive suffix, but formations to morphologically characterized verbal stems are rare (AiG II,2: 794f.
In speaking of alcohol, Santideva uses the gerundive form deya (SS 271), and the gerundive in -ya does not have the imperative force of the gerundive in -tavya (Coulson 188-9); therefore, he is saying only that alcohol may be given, not necessarily that it always should be.
Donno Gianni's incantation is constructed from a similar coupling of a repeated phrase (based on a gerundive form of the verb "toccare") with the identification of a body part: "bella testa; belli crini; belle gambe," etc.
He covers building morphosyntactic structure, Malagasy morphosyntax, gerundive and referential nominals, participant nominals, clausal nominals, and participant nominals and relative clauses.
The gerundive ending of the word, the -ing, gives it its structural dynamism.
This difference between the "representative" and the "objective" in their literal meaning is evidenced by a difference in the modality of his statement about reality: the claim of objectivity only constructs an object that can be contrasted to something relative to a subject (the object is subject, gerundive, to a subject); whereas the term representative refers to a metalevel of an object, a conscious differentiation between the object an sich (which is not accessible to our empiricism), and its concrete apparition as a trace that represents something before it was destroyed by our rational observation.
Whereas one thinks of a snapshot in the aorist tense, the individual snapshots that Sartre has gathered together provide instead a gerundive sense of the ancient world, illustrating the unity of the Greek world through its diversity and through time.
Creation, for Swedenborgians, was "a purely gerundive matter--God's perpetual act," with God holding "the work to man, at every stage.
This lyric will be consequential, opening with a grand gerundive phrase and claiming a capaciously exemplary being, the being of these days, along with a Blakean poetic authority--for these are poetical feet as well as the measured tramp of patriarchal possession.
All or most of the outer languages have (in the transitional zone the evidence is ambiguous) the following features which are missing with the inner languages (only the most relevant are quoted here): past forms in -l-; gerundive, nominal and future forms based on OIA -(i)tavva-; particular behaviours of the OIA vowels r, i and u; lexical evidence.
Stupendous" originates from the Latin stupendus "that is to be wondered at," which is a gerundive form of stupere "to be struck senseless, be amazed at" (OED).