gerundive


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ge·run·dive

 (jə-rŭn′dĭv)
n.
A verbal adjective in Latin that in the nominative case expresses the notion of fitness or obligation and in other cases functions as a future passive participle.

[Middle English gerundif, from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium, gerund; see gerund.]

gerundive

(dʒɪˈrʌndɪv)
n
(Grammar) (in Latin grammar) an adjective formed from a verb, expressing the desirability of the activity denoted by the verb
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to the gerund or gerundive
[C17: from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium gerund]
gerundival adj
geˈrundively adv

ger•un•dive

(dʒəˈrʌn dɪv)

n.
1. a Latin verbal adjective similar to the gerund in form and expressing the obligation, necessity, or worthiness of the action to be done, as legendus in Liber legendus est “The book is worth reading.”
adj.
2. resembling a gerund.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin gerundīvus. See gerund, -ive]
Translations

gerundive

[dʒəˈrʌndɪv]
A. ADJgerundivo
B. Ngerundio m

gerundive

nGerundivum nt

gerundive

[dʒɪˈrʌndɪv]
1. adjgerundivo/a
2. ngerundivo
References in periodicals archive ?
vier, vied, vide, verge, venue, vend, veined, vein, veering, veer, riven, revue, never, neve, nerve, grieved, grieve, giver, given, give, ever, even, envied, driven, drive, diverge, diver, dive, derive, GERUNDIVE Wordsquare: Q.
Most frequently, these words convey a sense of sexual violence in their passive and gerundive forms, when modifying a feminine noun that is the object of the action.
Here Virgil is using the gerundive form of the verb for, which comes from an irregular verb meaning 'to speak'.
For if we pay attention to Aquinas's use of the gerundive of obligation (faciendum et prosequendum), then this first precept of practical reason may be regarded as directive for reasonable agents, and hence intrinsically normative, rather than as an indicative statement concerning human nature or an imperative statement commanding a certain course of action.
This statement's construction, with the gerundive only intensifying the sense of obligation and necessity already inherent in the verb satisfacio, (35) suggests how little choice Atticus had in the matter.
Although no musical notation accompanies the text, the use of the gerundive in the incipit (representanda) and the inclusion of stage directions and speech prefixes establish that Hilarius intended Story of Daniel for performance at either matins or vespers sometime during the Christmas season.
In Vedic, -ya- is furthermore highly productive as a gerundive suffix, but formations to morphologically characterized verbal stems are rare (AiG II,2: 794f.
Donno Gianni's incantation is constructed from a similar coupling of a repeated phrase (based on a gerundive form of the verb "toccare") with the identification of a body part: "bella testa; belli crini; belle gambe," etc.
In speaking of alcohol, Santideva uses the gerundive form deya (SS 271), and the gerundive in -ya does not have the imperative force of the gerundive in -tavya (Coulson 188-9); therefore, he is saying only that alcohol may be given, not necessarily that it always should be.
He covers building morphosyntactic structure, Malagasy morphosyntax, gerundive and referential nominals, participant nominals, clausal nominals, and participant nominals and relative clauses.
The gerundive ending of the word, the -ing, gives it its structural dynamism.