gestural


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ges·ture

 (jĕs′chər)
n.
1.
a. A motion of the limbs or body made to express or help express thought or to emphasize speech.
b. The action of making such a motion or motions: communicated solely by gesture.
2. An act or a remark made as a formality or as a sign of intention or attitude: sent flowers as a gesture of sympathy.
v. ges·tured, ges·tur·ing, ges·tures
v.intr.
To make gestures.
v.tr.
To show, express, or direct by gestures: gestured her disapproval.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin gestūra, bearing, from Latin gestus, past participle of gerere, to carry, carry on, act.]

ges′tur·al adj.
ges′tur·al·ly adv.
ges′tur·er n.
Synonyms: gesture, gesticulation, sign, signal
These nouns denote an expressive, meaningful bodily motion: a gesture of approval; frantic gesticulations to get help; made a sign for silence; gave the signal to advance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gestural - used of the language of the deaf
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
2.gestural - being other than verbal communication; "the study of gestural communication"; "art like gesture is a form of nonverbal expression"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
Translations

gestural

[ˈdʒestʃərəl] ADJ [language] → gestual
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the strong language/gesture links in humans and the continuities between the gestural system in apes and monkeys and some language properties, we recently suggested the hypothesis of a continuity between language lateralization and asymmetry of communicative gestures in both human and nonhuman primates.
An indelible metonym for modernism, it is, as they say, overdetermined, so much so that to make a gestural mark today is to court a certain generic quality--and the nagging sense that whatever you're doing has, regrettably, been done before.
Gestural artwork, the other side of Carating's creative coin
However, pectoral appendages also function in social communication for the purposes of making sounds that we simply refer to as non-vocal sonic signals, and for gestural signalling.
Chapter 3 concludes with a coda titled "moving to read, moving to write," which explores the marriage of poetry and the digital age, an exploration that deserves a full chapter, since it raises the issue of the gestural both from the perspective of its emitter (the poet) and from that of its receptors or readers.
She observes, "This gestural language, along with the theme of pathology, produced a novel form of spectacle where automatic gestures and dislocated bodies took center stage" (34).
Some jury members thought the form overly gestural, but had to agree that the aim of bringing people closer to nature was triumphantly (and terrifyingly) realised.
There's a number with gestural language, which is "Supercalifragilistic.
One woman did an abstract gestural study that we accompanied with a recording of Gregorian chants, and the depth of sadness was staggering.
In the early church, standing, extending or raising the arms, and kneeling were common forms of gestural spirituality.
For a while here, Gleize and two of her key collaborators, cinematographer Crystel Fournier and editor Francois Quiquere, mix these different characters and their narratives through a complex montage of visual and gestural connections (yes, it evokes both the fluid gracefulness and tense unpredictability of a toreador's performance).
It is designed for gestural sign languages and graphic sign systems.