get behind


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.
Related to get behind: allow for, sort out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.get behind - to lag or linger behindget behind - to lag or linger behind; "But in so many other areas we still are dragging"
lag, fall back, fall behind, dawdle - hang (back) or fall (behind) in movement, progress, development, etc.

get

verb
1. To come into possession of:
Informal: land, pick up.
2. To obtain from another source:
3. To acquire as a result of one's behavior or effort:
Informal: rate.
4. To gain possession of, especially after a struggle or chase:
Informal: bag.
Slang: nail.
5. To receive, as wages, for one's labor:
Informal: pull down.
Idioms: earn a living, earn one's keep.
6. To succeed in communicating with:
Idioms: catch up with , get hold of, get in touch with, get through to, get to.
7. To become affected with a disease:
8. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Slang: dig.
Chiefly British: twig.
Scots: ken.
9. To gain knowledge or mastery of by study:
Informal: pick up.
10. To be the biological father of:
11. To cause to be in a certain state or to undergo a particular experience or action:
12. Informal. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
13. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
14. To obtain possession or control of:
Slang: cop.
15. To evoke a usually strong mental or emotional response from.Also used with to:
16. To trouble the nerves or peace of mind of, especially by repeated vexations:
Idioms: get in one's hair, get on one's nerves, get under one's skin.
17. To come to be:
become, come, grow, turn (out), wax.
phrasal verb
get acrossphrasal verb
get ahead
To gain success:
phrasal verb
get along
1. To live or act together in harmony:
Informal: cotton.
Idiom: hit it off.
2. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion:
3. To progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances:
Informal: make out.
Idioms: make do, make shift.
4. To grow old:
phrasal verb
get around
1. To keep away from:
Idioms: fight shy of, give a wide berth to, have no truck with, keep clear of.
2. To become known far and wide:
Idiom: go the rounds.
phrasal verb
get away
1. To break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation:
Informal: skip (out).
Slang: lam.
Regional: absquatulate.
Idioms: blow the coop, cut and run, give someone the slip, make a getaway, take flight, take it on the lam.
2. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
phrasal verb
get behind
To aid the cause of by approving or favoring:
Idioms: align oneself with, go to bat for, take the part of.
phrasal verb
get by
To progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances:
Informal: make out.
Idioms: make do, make shift.
phrasal verb
get in
To come to a particular place:
Slang: blow in.
phrasal verb
get off
2. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
phrasal verb
get on
1. To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
2. To live or act together in harmony:
Informal: cotton.
Idiom: hit it off.
3. To gain success:
4. To grow old:
phrasal verb
get out
1. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
2. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
phrasal verb
get to
To reach (a goal or objective):
Informal: hit on (or upon).
phrasal verb
get together
3. To come together face-to-face by arrangement:
4. To come to an understanding or to terms:
phrasal verb
get up
1. To leave one's bed:
Informal: turn out.
2. To adopt a standing posture:
noun
A group consisting of those descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
WATERFORD star Austin Gleeson says they've given their supporters a team to get behind once again.
Wilson said: "We want as many people as possible to get behind the Welsh team and we're delighted that businesses are getting behind us too with these fantastic gestures.
Swanswell's viewpoint is echoed by Mike McAdam, founder and trustee of Don't Be That Someone, a not-for-profit campaign which calls for more driving education for young people before they are old enough to get behind the wheel.