get into


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get 1

 (gĕt)
v. got (gŏt), got·ten (gŏt′n) or got, get·ting, gets
v.tr.
1.
a. To come into possession or use of; receive: got a cat for her birthday.
b. To meet with or incur: got nothing but trouble for her efforts.
2.
a. To go after and obtain: got a book at the library; got breakfast in town.
b. To go after and bring: Get me a pillow.
c. To purchase; buy: get groceries.
3.
a. To acquire as a result of action or effort: He got his information from the Internet. You can't get water out of a stone.
b. To earn: got high marks in math.
c. To accomplish or attain as a result of military action.
4. To obtain by concession or request: couldn't get the time off; got permission to go.
5.
a. To arrive at; reach: When did you get home?
b. To reach and board; catch: She got her plane two minutes before takeoff.
6. To succeed in communicating with, as by telephone: can't get me at the office until nine.
7. To become affected with (an illness, for example) by infection or exposure; catch: get the flu; got the mumps.
8.
a. To be subjected to; undergo: got a severe concussion.
b. To receive as retribution or punishment: got six years in prison for tax fraud.
c. To sustain a specified injury to: got my arm broken.
9.
a. To perceive or become aware of by one of the senses: get a whiff of perfume; got a look at the schedule.
b. To gain or have understanding of: Do you get this question?
c. To learn (a poem, for example) by heart; memorize.
d. To find or reach by calculating: get a total; can't get the answer.
10. To procreate; beget: "Is my life given me for nothing but to get children and work to bring them up?" (D.H. Lawrence).
11.
a. To cause to become or be in a specified state or condition: got the children tired and cross; got the shirt clean.
b. To make ready; prepare: get lunch for the family.
c. To cause to come or go: got the car through traffic.
d. To cause to move or leave: Get me out of here!
12. To cause to undertake or perform; prevail on: got the guide to give us the complete tour.
13.
a. To take, especially by force; seize: The detective got the suspect as he left the restaurant.
b. Informal To overcome or destroy: The ice storm got the rose bushes.
c. To evoke an emotional response or reaction in: Romantic music really gets me.
d. To annoy or irritate: What got me was his utter lack of initiative.
e. To present a difficult problem to; puzzle: "It's the suspect's indifference that gets me," the detective said.
f. To take revenge on, especially to kill in revenge for a wrong.
g. Informal To hit or strike: She got him on the chin. The bullet got him in the arm.
14. Baseball To put out or strike out: got the batter with a cut fastball.
15. To begin or start. Used with the present participle: I have to get working on this or I'll miss my deadline.
16.
a. To have current possession of. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: We've got plenty of cash.
b. Nonstandard To have current possession of. Used in the past tense form with the meaning of the present: They got a nice house in town.
c. To have as an obligation. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: I have got to leave early. You've got to do the dishes.
d. Nonstandard To have as an obligation. Used in the past tense with the meaning of the present: They got to clean up this mess.
v.intr.
1.
a. To become or grow to be: eventually got well.
b. To be successful in coming or going: When will we get to Dallas?
2. To be able or permitted: never got to see Europe; finally got to work at home.
3.
a. To be successful in becoming: get free of a drug problem.
b. Used with the past participle of transitive verbs as a passive voice auxiliary: got stung by a bee.
c. To become drawn in, entangled, or involved: got into debt; get into a hassle.
4. Informal To depart immediately: yelled at the dog to get.
5. To work for gain or profit; make money: Do you feel as though you're exhausting yourself getting and not making enough for spending?
n.
1. Progeny; offspring: a thoroughbred's get.
2. Chiefly British Slang A foolish or contemptible person.
3. Sports A return, as in tennis, on a shot that seems impossible to reach.
Phrasal Verbs:
get across
1. To make understandable or clear: tried to get my point across.
2. To be convincing or understandable: How can I get across to the students?
get after
To urge or scold: You should get after them to mow the lawn.
get ahead
To improve one's situation; be successful.
get along
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms: gets along with the in-laws.
2. To manage or fare with reasonable success: can't get along on those wages.
3. To make progress: Are you getting along with the project?
4. To grow old: getting along in years.
5. To go away; leave: The store owner told the children to get along.
get around
1. To circumvent or evade: managed to get around the rules.
2. To deal with; overcome: got around the problem.
3. To convince or win over by flattering or cajoling.
4. To travel from place to place: It is hard to get around without a car.
5. To become known; circulate: Word got around.
6. To have numerous sexual partners; be promiscuous.
get at
1. To touch or reach successfully: The cat hid where we couldn't get at it.
2. To try to make understandable; hint at or suggest: I don't know what you're getting at.
3. To discover or understand: tried to get at the cause of the problem.
4. Informal To bribe or influence by improper or illegal means: He got at the judge, and the charges were dismissed.
get away
1. To break free; escape.
2. To leave or go away: wanted to come along, but couldn't get away.
get back
To return to a person, place, or condition: Let's get back to the subject at hand.
get by
1. To succeed at a level of minimal acceptability or with the minimal amount of effort: just got by in college.
2. To succeed in managing; survive: We'll get by if we economize.
3. To be unnoticed or ignored by: The mistake got by the editor, but the proofreader caught it.
get down
1. To descend.
2. To give one's attention. Often used with to: Let's get down to work.
3. To exhaust, discourage, or depress: The heat was getting me down.
4. To swallow: got the pill down on the first try.
5. To describe in writing: If I could just get down how I feel!
6. Informal To lose one's inhibitions; enjoy oneself wholeheartedly.
get in
1. To enter: got in the garage.
2. To arrive: We got in late last night.
3. To become or cause to become involved: She got in with the wrong crowd. Repeated loans from the finance company got me deeper in debt.
4. To become accepted, as in a club.
5. To succeed in making or doing: got in six deliveries before noon.
get into
1. To become involved in: got into trouble by stealing cars.
2. Informal To be interested in: got into gourmet cooking.
3. To affect, especially negatively: What's gotten into you lately?
get off
1. To start, as on a trip; leave.
2. To fire (a round of ammunition, for example): got off two shots before the deer disappeared.
3. To write and send, as a letter.
4. To escape, as from punishment or danger: got off scot-free.
5. To obtain a release or lesser penalty for: The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist.
6. To get permission to leave one's workplace: got off early and went fishing.
7. Informal To act or speak with effrontery: Where does he get off telling me to hurry up?
8. Slang
a. To have an orgasm.
b. To feel great pleasure or gratification: gets off on gossiping about coworkers.
c. To experience euphoria, for example, as a result of taking a drug.
get on
1. To be or continue on harmonious terms: gets on well with the neighbors.
2. To manage or fare: How are you getting on?
3. To make progress; continue: get on with a performance.
4. To grow old: The CEO is getting on and will retire soon.
5. To acquire understanding or knowledge: got on to the con game.
get out
1. To leave or escape: Our canary got out.
2. To become known: Somehow the secret got out.
3. To publish, as a newspaper.
get over
1. To get across: got over the ditch.
2. To recover from: finally got over the divorce.
get through
1. To finish or assist in finishing: The rat got through the maze. His mother got him through the college application process.
2. To succeed in making contact: telephoned but couldn't get through.
3. To make oneself understood: What do I need to do to get through to you?
get to
1. To begin. Used with the present participle: got to reminiscing.
2. To start to deal with: didn't get to the housework until Sunday.
3. To influence or affect, especially adversely: The noise really gets to me.
get together
1. To bring together; gather: getting the author's correspondence together.
2. To come together: We got together for lunch.
3. To arrive at an agreement: The feuding parties finally got together.
get up
1. To arise from bed or rise to one's feet: She got up and opened the door.
2. To climb: How long will it take to get up the mountain?
3. To act as the creator or organizer of: got up a petition against rezoning.
4. To dress or adorn: She got herself up in a bizarre outfit.
5. To find within oneself; summon: got up the nerve to quit.
Idioms:
get around to
To find the time or occasion for; deal with: We finally got around to unpacking our knickknacks.
get away with
To escape the consequences of (a blameworthy act, for example): got away with cheating.
get back at
To take revenge on.
get cracking
To begin to work; get started.
get even
To obtain revenge.
get even with
To repay with an equivalent act, as for revenge.
get going
To make a beginning; get started.
get hold/ahold of
1. To bring into one's grasp, possession, or control.
2. To communicate with, especially by telephone.
get it Informal
To be punished or scolded: You broke the vase. Now you're really going to get it!
get it on Slang
1. To become filled with energy or excitement.
2. To engage in sexual intercourse.
get it up
Vulgar Slang To have an erection.
get nowhere
To make no progress.
get (one's) Informal
To receive one's due punishment: After sassing his parents, he really got his.
get on the stick
To begin to work.
get on with
To continue or resume doing (something); make progress regarding: We must get on with the project.
get out of
To gain release from the obligation of: She tried to get out of taking her brother to the mall. He couldn't get out of his date on Saturday.
get (someone's) goat
To make angry or vexed.
get somewhere Informal
To make progress.
get there Informal
To make progress or achieve success: I'm not finished, but I'm getting there.
get wind of
To learn of: got wind of the scheme.

[Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta; see ghend- in Indo-European roots.]

get′a·ble, get′ta·ble adj.
Usage Note: The use of get in the passive, as in We got sunburned at the beach, is generally avoided in formal writing. In less formal contexts, however, the construction can provide a useful difference in tone or emphasis, as between the sentences The demonstrators were arrested and The demonstrators got arrested. The first example implies that the responsibility for the arrests rests primarily with the police, while the example using get implies that the demonstrators deliberately provoked the arrests. · In colloquial use and in numerous nonstandard varieties of American English, the past tense form got has the meaning of the present. This arose probably by dropping the helping verb have from the past perfects have got, has got. We've got to go, we've got a lot of problems became We got to go, we got a lot of problems. The reanalysis of got as a present-tense form has led to the creation of a third-person singular gots in some varieties of English.

get 2

 (gĕt)
n. pl. git·tin (gē-tēn′, gĭt′ĭn)
1. A document presented by a husband to his wife whereby a divorce is effected between them according to Jewish religious law.
2. A divorce effected by a get.

[Mishnaic Hebrew gēṭ, from Aramaic, from Akkadian giṭṭu, long clay tablet, receipt, document, from Sumerian gíd.da, long.]

get into

vb (preposition)
1. (intr) to enter
2. (intr) to reach (a destination): the train got into London at noon.
3. (Clothing & Fashion) to get dressed in (clothes)
4. (intr) to preoccupy or obsess (a person's emotions or thoughts): what's got into him tonight?.
5. to assume or cause to assume (a specified condition, habit, etc): to get into debt; get a person into a mess.
6. to be elected to or cause to be elected to: to get into Parliament.
7. (usually intr) informal to become or cause to become familiar with (a skill): once you get into driving you'll enjoy it.
8. (usually intr) informal to develop or cause to develop an absorbing interest in (a hobby, subject, or book)

go into

get intoget on
1. 'go into'

When you enter a building or room, you usually say that you go into it or go in.

I went into the church.
She took him to the kitchen, switching on the light as she went in.
2. 'enter'

In formal English, you can also say that you enter a building or room.

Nervously he entered the classroom.
3. 'get into'

When you enter a car or other small vehicle, you say that you get into it or get in.

I saw him get into a taxi.
He unlocked the van, got in and drove away.

You also say that you get into a lift, a small boat, or a small plane.

4. 'get on' and 'board'

When you enter a bus, train, large plane, or ship, you say that you get on it or board it.

The bus stopped and several more people got on.
Rina boarded a train for Kyoto.

Be Careful!
You never say that someone 'goes into' or 'enters' any kind of vehicle.

5. entering with difficulty

If you enter a building or room with difficulty, you say that you get into it or get in.

Someone had got into his office and stolen some papers.
It cost $10 to get in.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.get into - get involved in or with
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
2.get into - to come or go into; "the boat entered an area of shallow marshes"
take the field - go on the playing field, of a football team
penetrate, perforate - pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; "The bullet penetrated her chest"
re-enter - enter again; "You cannot re-enter the country with this visa"
file in - enter by marching in a file
pop in - enter briefly; "He popped in for two minutes"
walk in - enter by walking; "She walks in at all hours, as if she lived here"
call at, out in - enter a harbor; "the ship called in Athens"
take water - enter the water; "the wild ducks took water"
turn in - make an entrance by turning from a road; "Turn in after you see the gate"
board, get on - get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
intrude, irrupt - enter uninvited; "They intruded on our dinner party"; "She irrupted into our sitting room"
encroach upon, intrude on, obtrude upon, invade - to intrude upon, infringe, encroach on, violate; "This new colleague invades my territory"; "The neighbors intrude on your privacy"
dock - come into dock; "the ship docked"
3.get into - secure a place in a college, university, etc.
obtain - come into possession of; "How did you obtain the visa?"
4.get into - familiarize oneself thoroughly with; "He really got into semantics"
familiarise, familiarize, acquaint - make familiar or conversant with; "you should acquaint yourself with your new computer"; "We familiarized ourselves with the new surroundings"
5.get into - put clothing on one's bodyget into - put clothing on one's body; "What should I wear today?"; "He put on his best suit for the wedding"; "The princess donned a long blue dress"; "The queen assumed the stately robes"; "He got into his jeans"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
hat - put on or wear a hat; "He was unsuitably hatted"
try on, try - put on a garment in order to see whether it fits and looks nice; "Try on this sweater to see how it looks"
scarf - wrap in or adorn with a scarf
slip on - put on with ease or speed; "slip into something more comfortable after work"; "slip on one's shoes"
Translations
يَبدأ بالتَّصَرُّف بِطريقَة مُعينَهيَتَصَرَّف بصورة غريبَهيَتَوَرَّطُ فييَرْتَدي، يَلْبِس
angažovat sedostat se doobléci sepopadnoutposednout
gå afklæde sig påkomme ikomme ind i
joutua
zainteresirati se za
kerülleszokik
fara íhlaupa íverîa
・・・に到着する
(특정한 상태에) 처하다
dostať sa dovojsť do
komma in i
เข้าร่วมใน
tham gia

get

(get) past tense got (got) : past participle got (American) gotten (ˈgotn) verb
1. to receive or obtain. I got a letter this morning.
2. to bring or buy. Please get me some food.
3. to (manage to) move, go, take, put etc. He couldn't get across the river; I got the book down from the shelf.
4. to cause to be in a certain condition etc. You'll get me into trouble.
5. to become. You're getting old.
6. to persuade. I'll try to get him to go.
7. to arrive. When did they get home?
8. to succeed (in doing) or to happen (to do) something. I'll soon get to know the neighbours; I got the book read last night.
9. to catch (a disease etc). She got measles last week.
10. to catch (someone). The police will soon get the thief.
11. to understand. I didn't get the point of his story.
ˈgetaway noun
an escape. The thieves made their getaway in a stolen car; (also adjective) a getaway car.
ˈget-together noun
an informal meeting.
ˈget-up noun
clothes, usually odd or unattractive. She wore a very strange get-up at the party.
be getting on for
to be close to (a particular age, time etc). He must be getting on for sixty at least.
get about
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got about that she was leaving.
2. to be able to move or travel about, often of people who have been ill. She didn't get about much after her operation.
get across
to be or make (something) understood. This is something which rarely gets across to the general public.
get after
to follow. If you want to catch him, you had better get after him at once.
get ahead
to make progress; to be successful. If you want to get ahead, you must work hard.
get along (often with with)
to be friendly or on good terms (with someone). I get along very well with him; The children just cannot get along together.
get around
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got around that she was leaving her job.
2. (of people) to be active or involved in many activities. He really gets around, doesn't he!
get around toget round toget at
1. to reach (a place, thing etc). The farm is very difficult to get at.
2. to suggest or imply (something). What are you getting at?
3. to point out (a person's faults) or make fun of (a person). He's always getting at me.
get away
1. to (be able to) leave. I usually get away (from the office) at four-thirty.
2. to escape. The thieves got away in a stolen car.
get away with
to do (something bad) without being punished for it. Murder is a serious crime and one rarely gets away with it.
get back
1. to move away. The policeman told the crowd to get back.
2. to retrieve. She eventually got back the book she had lent him.
get by
to manage. I can't get by on such a small salary.
get down
to make (a person) sad. Working in this place really gets me down.
get down to
to begin to work (hard) at. I must get down to work tonight, as the exams start next week.
get in
to send for (a person). The television is broken – we'll need to get a man in to repair it.
get into
1. to put on (clothes etc). Get into your pyjamas.
2. to begin to be in a particular state or behave in a particular way. He got into a temper.
3. to affect strangely. I don't know what has got into him
get nowhere
to make no progress. You'll get nowhere if you follow his instructions.
get off
1. to take off or remove (clothes, marks etc). I can't get my boots off; I'll never get these stains off (my dress).
2. to change (the subject which one is talking, writing etc about). We've rather got off the subject.
get on
1. to make progress or be successful. How are you getting on in your new job?
2. to work, live etc in a friendly way. We get on very well together; I get on well with him.
3. to grow old. Our doctor is getting on a bit now.
4. to put (clothes etc) on. Go and get your coat on.
5. to continue doing something. I must get on, so please don't interrupt me; I must get on with my work.
get on at
to criticize (a person) continually or frequently. My wife is always getting on at me.
get out
1. to leave or escape. No-one knows how the lion got out.
2. (of information) to become known. I've no idea how word got out that you were leaving.
get out of
to (help a person etc to) avoid doing something. I wonder how I can get out of washing the dishes; How can I get him out of going to the party?
get over
1. to recover from (an illness, surprise, disappointment etc). I've got over my cold now; I can't get over her leaving so suddenly.
2. to manage to make (oneself or something) understood. We must get our message over to the general public.
3. (with with) to do (something one does not want to do). I'm not looking forward to this meeting, but let's get it over (with).
get round
1. to persuade (a person etc) to do something to one's own advantage. She can always get round her grandfather by giving him a big smile.
2. to solve (a problem etc). We can easily get round these few difficulties.
get (a)round to
to manage to (do something). I don't know when I'll get round to (painting) the door.
get there
to succeed or make progress. There have been a lot of problems but we're getting there.
get through
1. to finish (work etc). We got through a lot of work today.
2. to pass (an examination).
3. to arrive, usually with some difficulty. The food got through to the fort despite the enemy's attempts to stop it.
4. to make oneself understood. I just can't get through to her any more.
get together
to meet. We usually get together once a week.
get up
1. to (cause to) get out of bed. I got up at seven o'clock; Get John up at seven o'clock.
2. to stand up.
3. to increase (usually speed).
4. to arrange, organize or prepare (something). We must get up some sort of celebration for him when he leaves.
get up to
to do (something bad). He's always getting up to mischief.

get into

يَتَوَرَّطُ في angažovat se komme ind i geraten in μπαίνω meterse joutua se lancer zainteresirati se za entrare ・・・に到着する (특정한 상태에) 처하다 ergens in verzeild raken havne i wejść conseguir entrar заняться komma in i เข้าร่วมใน inmek tham gia 开始从事
References in classic literature ?
All the ashes will get into it--there, now I think you're tidy enough
When the Guardian of the Gate saw them again he wondered greatly that they could leave the beautiful City to get into new trouble.
So we jogged along, and now and then we struck a stretch of dust, and it would tumble up in clouds and get into my nose and make me sneeze and cry; and of course I said things I oughtn't to have said, I don't deny that.