get up

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get 1

v. got (gŏt), got·ten (gŏt′n) or got, get·ting, gets
a. To come into possession or use of; receive: got a cat for her birthday.
b. To meet with or incur: got nothing but trouble for her efforts.
a. To go after and obtain: got a book at the library; got breakfast in town.
b. To go after and bring: Get me a pillow.
c. To purchase; buy: get groceries.
a. To acquire as a result of action or effort: He got his information from the Internet. You can't get water out of a stone.
b. To earn: got high marks in math.
c. To accomplish or attain as a result of military action.
4. To obtain by concession or request: couldn't get the time off; got permission to go.
a. To arrive at; reach: When did you get home?
b. To reach and board; catch: She got her plane two minutes before takeoff.
6. To succeed in communicating with, as by telephone: can't get me at the office until nine.
7. To become affected with (an illness, for example) by infection or exposure; catch: get the flu; got the mumps.
a. To be subjected to; undergo: got a severe concussion.
b. To receive as retribution or punishment: got six years in prison for tax fraud.
c. To sustain a specified injury to: got my arm broken.
a. To perceive or become aware of by one of the senses: get a whiff of perfume; got a look at the schedule.
b. To gain or have understanding of: Do you get this question?
c. To learn (a poem, for example) by heart; memorize.
d. To find or reach by calculating: get a total; can't get the answer.
10. To procreate; beget: "Is my life given me for nothing but to get children and work to bring them up?" (D.H. Lawrence).
a. To cause to become or be in a specified state or condition: got the children tired and cross; got the shirt clean.
b. To make ready; prepare: get lunch for the family.
c. To cause to come or go: got the car through traffic.
d. To cause to move or leave: Get me out of here!
12. To cause to undertake or perform; prevail on: got the guide to give us the complete tour.
a. To take, especially by force; seize: The detective got the suspect as he left the restaurant.
b. Informal To overcome or destroy: The ice storm got the rose bushes.
c. To evoke an emotional response or reaction in: Romantic music really gets me.
d. To annoy or irritate: What got me was his utter lack of initiative.
e. To present a difficult problem to; puzzle: "It's the suspect's indifference that gets me," the detective said.
f. To take revenge on, especially to kill in revenge for a wrong.
g. Informal To hit or strike: She got him on the chin. The bullet got him in the arm.
14. Baseball To put out or strike out: got the batter with a cut fastball.
15. To begin or start. Used with the present participle: I have to get working on this or I'll miss my deadline.
a. To have current possession of. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: We've got plenty of cash.
b. Nonstandard To have current possession of. Used in the past tense form with the meaning of the present: They got a nice house in town.
c. To have as an obligation. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: I have got to leave early. You've got to do the dishes.
d. Nonstandard To have as an obligation. Used in the past tense with the meaning of the present: They got to clean up this mess.
a. To become or grow to be: eventually got well.
b. To be successful in coming or going: When will we get to Dallas?
2. To be able or permitted: never got to see Europe; finally got to work at home.
a. To be successful in becoming: get free of a drug problem.
b. Used with the past participle of transitive verbs as a passive voice auxiliary: got stung by a bee.
c. To become drawn in, entangled, or involved: got into debt; get into a hassle.
4. Informal To depart immediately: yelled at the dog to get.
5. To work for gain or profit; make money: Do you feel as though you're exhausting yourself getting and not making enough for spending?
1. Progeny; offspring: a thoroughbred's get.
2. Chiefly British Slang A foolish or contemptible person.
3. Sports A return, as in tennis, on a shot that seems impossible to reach.
Phrasal Verbs:
get across
1. To make understandable or clear: tried to get my point across.
2. To be convincing or understandable: How can I get across to the students?
get after
To urge or scold: You should get after them to mow the lawn.
get ahead
To improve one's situation; be successful.
get along
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms: gets along with the in-laws.
2. To manage or fare with reasonable success: can't get along on those wages.
3. To make progress: Are you getting along with the project?
4. To grow old: getting along in years.
5. To go away; leave: The store owner told the children to get along.
get around
1. To circumvent or evade: managed to get around the rules.
2. To deal with; overcome: got around the problem.
3. To convince or win over by flattering or cajoling.
4. To travel from place to place: It is hard to get around without a car.
5. To become known; circulate: Word got around.
6. To have numerous sexual partners; be promiscuous.
get at
1. To touch or reach successfully: The cat hid where we couldn't get at it.
2. To try to make understandable; hint at or suggest: I don't know what you're getting at.
3. To discover or understand: tried to get at the cause of the problem.
4. Informal To bribe or influence by improper or illegal means: He got at the judge, and the charges were dismissed.
get away
1. To break free; escape.
2. To leave or go away: wanted to come along, but couldn't get away.
get back
To return to a person, place, or condition: Let's get back to the subject at hand.
get by
1. To succeed at a level of minimal acceptability or with the minimal amount of effort: just got by in college.
2. To succeed in managing; survive: We'll get by if we economize.
3. To be unnoticed or ignored by: The mistake got by the editor, but the proofreader caught it.
get down
1. To descend.
2. To give one's attention. Often used with to: Let's get down to work.
3. To exhaust, discourage, or depress: The heat was getting me down.
4. To swallow: got the pill down on the first try.
5. To describe in writing: If I could just get down how I feel!
6. Informal To lose one's inhibitions; enjoy oneself wholeheartedly.
get in
1. To enter: got in the garage.
2. To arrive: We got in late last night.
3. To become or cause to become involved: She got in with the wrong crowd. Repeated loans from the finance company got me deeper in debt.
4. To become accepted, as in a club.
5. To succeed in making or doing: got in six deliveries before noon.
get into
1. To become involved in: got into trouble by stealing cars.
2. Informal To be interested in: got into gourmet cooking.
3. To affect, especially negatively: What's gotten into you lately?
get off
1. To start, as on a trip; leave.
2. To fire (a round of ammunition, for example): got off two shots before the deer disappeared.
3. To write and send, as a letter.
4. To escape, as from punishment or danger: got off scot-free.
5. To obtain a release or lesser penalty for: The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist.
6. To get permission to leave one's workplace: got off early and went fishing.
7. Informal To act or speak with effrontery: Where does he get off telling me to hurry up?
8. Slang
a. To have an orgasm.
b. To feel great pleasure or gratification: gets off on gossiping about coworkers.
c. To experience euphoria, for example, as a result of taking a drug.
get on
1. To be or continue on harmonious terms: gets on well with the neighbors.
2. To manage or fare: How are you getting on?
3. To make progress; continue: get on with a performance.
4. To grow old: The CEO is getting on and will retire soon.
5. To acquire understanding or knowledge: got on to the con game.
get out
1. To leave or escape: Our canary got out.
2. To become known: Somehow the secret got out.
3. To publish, as a newspaper.
get over
1. To get across: got over the ditch.
2. To recover from: finally got over the divorce.
get through
1. To finish or assist in finishing: The rat got through the maze. His mother got him through the college application process.
2. To succeed in making contact: telephoned but couldn't get through.
3. To make oneself understood: What do I need to do to get through to you?
get to
1. To begin. Used with the present participle: got to reminiscing.
2. To start to deal with: didn't get to the housework until Sunday.
3. To influence or affect, especially adversely: The noise really gets to me.
get together
1. To bring together; gather: getting the author's correspondence together.
2. To come together: We got together for lunch.
3. To arrive at an agreement: The feuding parties finally got together.
get up
1. To arise from bed or rise to one's feet: She got up and opened the door.
2. To climb: How long will it take to get up the mountain?
3. To act as the creator or organizer of: got up a petition against rezoning.
4. To dress or adorn: She got herself up in a bizarre outfit.
5. To find within oneself; summon: got up the nerve to quit.
get around to
To find the time or occasion for; deal with: We finally got around to unpacking our knickknacks.
get away with
To escape the consequences of (a blameworthy act, for example): got away with cheating.
get back at
To take revenge on.
get cracking
To begin to work; get started.
get even
To obtain revenge.
get even with
To repay with an equivalent act, as for revenge.
get going
To make a beginning; get started.
get hold/ahold of
1. To bring into one's grasp, possession, or control.
2. To communicate with, especially by telephone.
get it Informal
To be punished or scolded: You broke the vase. Now you're really going to get it!
get it on Slang
1. To become filled with energy or excitement.
2. To engage in sexual intercourse.
get it up
Vulgar Slang To have an erection.
get nowhere
To make no progress.
get (one's) Informal
To receive one's due punishment: After sassing his parents, he really got his.
get on the stick
To begin to work.
get on with
To continue or resume doing (something); make progress regarding: We must get on with the project.
get out of
To gain release from the obligation of: She tried to get out of taking her brother to the mall. He couldn't get out of his date on Saturday.
get (someone's) goat
To make angry or vexed.
get somewhere Informal
To make progress.
get there Informal
To make progress or achieve success: I'm not finished, but I'm getting there.
get wind of
To learn of: got wind of the scheme.

[Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta; see ghend- in Indo-European roots.]

get′a·ble, get′ta·ble adj.
Usage Note: The use of get in the passive, as in We got sunburned at the beach, is generally avoided in formal writing. In less formal contexts, however, the construction can provide a useful difference in tone or emphasis, as between the sentences The demonstrators were arrested and The demonstrators got arrested. The first example implies that the responsibility for the arrests rests primarily with the police, while the example using get implies that the demonstrators deliberately provoked the arrests. · In colloquial use and in numerous nonstandard varieties of American English, the past tense form got has the meaning of the present. This arose probably by dropping the helping verb have from the past perfects have got, has got. We've got to go, we've got a lot of problems became We got to go, we got a lot of problems. The reanalysis of got as a present-tense form has led to the creation of a third-person singular gots in some varieties of English.

get 2

n. pl. git·tin (gē-tēn′, gĭt′ĭn)
1. A document presented by a husband to his wife whereby a divorce is effected between them according to Jewish religious law.
2. A divorce effected by a get.

[Mishnaic Hebrew gēṭ, from Aramaic, from Akkadian giṭṭu, long clay tablet, receipt, document, from Sumerian gíd.da, long.]

get up

vb (mainly adverb)
1. to wake and rise from one's bed or cause to wake and rise from bed
2. (intr) to rise to one's feet; stand up
3. (also preposition) to ascend or cause to ascend: the old van couldn't get up the hill.
4. to mount or help to mount (a bicycle, horse, etc)
5. to increase or cause to increase in strength: the wind got up at noon.
6. (tr) informal to dress (oneself) in a particular way, esp showily or elaborately
7. (tr) informal to devise or create: to get up an entertainment for Christmas.
8. (tr) informal to study or improve one's knowledge of: I must get up my history.
9. informal (foll by: to) to be involved in: he's always getting up to mischief.
10. (intr) informal Austral to win, esp in a sporting event
11. informal a costume or outfit, esp one that is striking or bizarre
12. informal the arrangement or production of a book, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.get up - rise to one's feetget up - rise to one's feet; "The audience got up and applauded"
take the floor - stand up to dance
change posture - undergo a change in bodily posture
2.get up - get up and out of bedget up - get up and out of bed; "I get up at 7 A.M. every day"; "They rose early"; "He uprose at night"
crawl in, go to bed, go to sleep, hit the hay, hit the sack, kip down, sack out, turn in, bed, retire - prepare for sleep; "I usually turn in at midnight"; "He goes to bed at the crack of dawn"
3.get up - raise from a lower to a higher position; "Raise your hands"; "Lift a load"
get up - cause to rise; "The sergeant got us up at 2 A.M."
jack, jack up - lift with a special device; "jack up the car so you can change the tire"
shoulder - lift onto one's shoulders
kick up - cause to rise by kicking; "kick up dust"
hoist, wind, lift - raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car"
trice, trice up - raise with a line; "trice a window shade"
run up, hoist - raise; "hoist the flags"; "hoist a sail"
hoist - move from one place to another by lifting; "They hoisted the patient onto the operating table"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
pump - raise (gases or fluids) with a pump
levitate - cause to rise in the air and float, as if in defiance of gravity; "The magician levitated the woman"
underlay - raise or support (the level of printing) by inserting a piece of paper or cardboard under the type; "underlay the plate"
skid - elevate onto skids
pinnacle - raise on or as if on a pinnacle; "He did not want to be pinnacled"
chin, chin up - raise oneself while hanging from one's hands until one's chin is level with the support bar
leaven, prove, raise - cause to puff up with a leaven; "unleavened bread"
heighten - increase the height of; "The athletes kept jumping over the steadily heightened bars"
boost, hike, hike up - increase; "The landlord hiked up the rents"
gather up, lift up, pick up - take and lift upward
erect, rear - cause to rise up
4.get up - cause to rise; "The sergeant got us up at 2 A.M."
lift, raise, elevate, get up, bring up - raise from a lower to a higher position; "Raise your hands"; "Lift a load"
5.get up - develop; "we worked up an as of an appetite"
acquire, develop, produce, grow, get - come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts"
6.get up - put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractiveget up - put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive; "She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera"; "The young girls were all fancied up for the party"
primp, preen, dress, plume - dress or groom with elaborate care; "She likes to dress when going to the opera"
prank - dress up showily; "He pranked himself out in his best clothes"
tart up - dress up in a cheap and provocative way
dress, dress up - dress in a certain manner; "She dresses in the latest Paris fashion"; "he dressed up in a suit and tie"
enrobe - adorn with a robe
dizen, bedizen - dress up garishly and tastelessly
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
costume, dress up - dress in a costume; "We dressed up for Halloween as pumpkins"
7.get up - arrange by systematic planning and united effortget up - arrange by systematic planning and united effort; "machinate a plot"; "organize a strike"; "devise a plan to take over the director's office"
initiate, pioneer - take the lead or initiative in; participate in the development of; "This South African surgeon pioneered heart transplants"
put on, mount - prepare and supply with the necessary equipment for execution or performance; "mount a theater production"; "mount an attack"; "mount a play"
lay - prepare or position for action or operation; "lay a fire"; "lay the foundation for a new health care plan"
set up - begin, or enable someone else to begin, a venture by providing the means, logistics, etc.; "set up an election"
sandwich - make into a sandwich
spatchcock - prepare for eating if or as if a spatchcock; "spatchcock a guinea hen"
embattle - prepare for battle or conflict
8.get up - study intensively, as before an exam; "I had to bone up on my Latin verbs before the final exam"
cram - prepare (students) hastily for an impending exam
hit the books, study - learn by reading books; "He is studying geology in his room"; "I have an exam next week; I must hit the books now"


1. To come into possession of:
Informal: land, pick up.
2. To obtain from another source:
3. To acquire as a result of one's behavior or effort:
Informal: rate.
4. To gain possession of, especially after a struggle or chase:
Informal: bag.
Slang: nail.
5. To receive, as wages, for one's labor:
Informal: pull down.
Idioms: earn a living, earn one's keep.
6. To succeed in communicating with:
Idioms: catch up with , get hold of, get in touch with, get through to, get to.
7. To become affected with a disease:
8. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Slang: dig.
Chiefly British: twig.
Scots: ken.
9. To gain knowledge or mastery of by study:
Informal: pick up.
10. To be the biological father of:
11. To cause to be in a certain state or to undergo a particular experience or action:
12. Informal. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
13. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
14. To obtain possession or control of:
Slang: cop.
15. To evoke a usually strong mental or emotional response from.Also used with to:
16. To trouble the nerves or peace of mind of, especially by repeated vexations:
Idioms: get in one's hair, get on one's nerves, get under one's skin.
17. To come to be:
become, come, grow, turn (out), wax.
phrasal verb
get acrossphrasal verb
get ahead
To gain success:
phrasal verb
get along
1. To live or act together in harmony:
Informal: cotton.
Idiom: hit it off.
2. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion:
3. To progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances:
Informal: make out.
Idioms: make do, make shift.
4. To grow old:
phrasal verb
get around
1. To keep away from:
Idioms: fight shy of, give a wide berth to, have no truck with, keep clear of.
2. To become known far and wide:
Idiom: go the rounds.
phrasal verb
get away
1. To break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation:
Informal: skip (out).
Slang: lam.
Regional: absquatulate.
Idioms: blow the coop, cut and run, give someone the slip, make a getaway, take flight, take it on the lam.
2. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
phrasal verb
get behind
To aid the cause of by approving or favoring:
Idioms: align oneself with, go to bat for, take the part of.
phrasal verb
get by
To progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances:
Informal: make out.
Idioms: make do, make shift.
phrasal verb
get in
To come to a particular place:
Slang: blow in.
phrasal verb
get off
2. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
phrasal verb
get on
1. To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
2. To live or act together in harmony:
Informal: cotton.
Idiom: hit it off.
3. To gain success:
4. To grow old:
phrasal verb
get out
1. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
2. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
phrasal verb
get to
To reach (a goal or objective):
Informal: hit on (or upon).
phrasal verb
get together
3. To come together face-to-face by arrangement:
4. To come to an understanding or to terms:
phrasal verb
get up
1. To leave one's bed:
Informal: turn out.
2. To adopt a standing posture:
A group consisting of those descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
افاققاميَزيدُ السُّرْعَهيَسْتَيْقِظيُنَظِّم، يُعِدُّ
arrangereøgerejse (sig)vække
nousta ylös
aukastfara á fæturskipuleggja, undirbúastanda upp, rísa á fætur
stiga upp
artmakayağa kalkmakdüzenlemekkalkmaktertiplemek
đứng dậy


(get) past tense got (got) : past participle got (American) gotten (ˈgotn) verb
1. to receive or obtain. I got a letter this morning.
2. to bring or buy. Please get me some food.
3. to (manage to) move, go, take, put etc. He couldn't get across the river; I got the book down from the shelf.
4. to cause to be in a certain condition etc. You'll get me into trouble.
5. to become. You're getting old.
6. to persuade. I'll try to get him to go.
7. to arrive. When did they get home?
8. to succeed (in doing) or to happen (to do) something. I'll soon get to know the neighbours; I got the book read last night.
9. to catch (a disease etc). She got measles last week.
10. to catch (someone). The police will soon get the thief.
11. to understand. I didn't get the point of his story.
ˈgetaway noun
an escape. The thieves made their getaway in a stolen car; (also adjective) a getaway car.
ˈget-together noun
an informal meeting.
ˈget-up noun
clothes, usually odd or unattractive. She wore a very strange get-up at the party.
be getting on for
to be close to (a particular age, time etc). He must be getting on for sixty at least.
get about
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got about that she was leaving.
2. to be able to move or travel about, often of people who have been ill. She didn't get about much after her operation.
get across
to be or make (something) understood. This is something which rarely gets across to the general public.
get after
to follow. If you want to catch him, you had better get after him at once.
get ahead
to make progress; to be successful. If you want to get ahead, you must work hard.
get along (often with with)
to be friendly or on good terms (with someone). I get along very well with him; The children just cannot get along together.
get around
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got around that she was leaving her job.
2. (of people) to be active or involved in many activities. He really gets around, doesn't he!
get around toget round toget at
1. to reach (a place, thing etc). The farm is very difficult to get at.
2. to suggest or imply (something). What are you getting at?
3. to point out (a person's faults) or make fun of (a person). He's always getting at me.
get away
1. to (be able to) leave. I usually get away (from the office) at four-thirty.
2. to escape. The thieves got away in a stolen car.
get away with
to do (something bad) without being punished for it. Murder is a serious crime and one rarely gets away with it.
get back
1. to move away. The policeman told the crowd to get back.
2. to retrieve. She eventually got back the book she had lent him.
get by
to manage. I can't get by on such a small salary.
get down
to make (a person) sad. Working in this place really gets me down.
get down to
to begin to work (hard) at. I must get down to work tonight, as the exams start next week.
get in
to send for (a person). The television is broken – we'll need to get a man in to repair it.
get into
1. to put on (clothes etc). Get into your pyjamas.
2. to begin to be in a particular state or behave in a particular way. He got into a temper.
3. to affect strangely. I don't know what has got into him
get nowhere
to make no progress. You'll get nowhere if you follow his instructions.
get off
1. to take off or remove (clothes, marks etc). I can't get my boots off; I'll never get these stains off (my dress).
2. to change (the subject which one is talking, writing etc about). We've rather got off the subject.
get on
1. to make progress or be successful. How are you getting on in your new job?
2. to work, live etc in a friendly way. We get on very well together; I get on well with him.
3. to grow old. Our doctor is getting on a bit now.
4. to put (clothes etc) on. Go and get your coat on.
5. to continue doing something. I must get on, so please don't interrupt me; I must get on with my work.
get on at
to criticize (a person) continually or frequently. My wife is always getting on at me.
get out
1. to leave or escape. No-one knows how the lion got out.
2. (of information) to become known. I've no idea how word got out that you were leaving.
get out of
to (help a person etc to) avoid doing something. I wonder how I can get out of washing the dishes; How can I get him out of going to the party?
get over
1. to recover from (an illness, surprise, disappointment etc). I've got over my cold now; I can't get over her leaving so suddenly.
2. to manage to make (oneself or something) understood. We must get our message over to the general public.
3. (with with) to do (something one does not want to do). I'm not looking forward to this meeting, but let's get it over (with).
get round
1. to persuade (a person etc) to do something to one's own advantage. She can always get round her grandfather by giving him a big smile.
2. to solve (a problem etc). We can easily get round these few difficulties.
get (a)round to
to manage to (do something). I don't know when I'll get round to (painting) the door.
get there
to succeed or make progress. There have been a lot of problems but we're getting there.
get through
1. to finish (work etc). We got through a lot of work today.
2. to pass (an examination).
3. to arrive, usually with some difficulty. The food got through to the fort despite the enemy's attempts to stop it.
4. to make oneself understood. I just can't get through to her any more.
get together
to meet. We usually get together once a week.
get up
1. to (cause to) get out of bed. I got up at seven o'clock; Get John up at seven o'clock.
2. to stand up.
3. to increase (usually speed).
4. to arrange, organize or prepare (something). We must get up some sort of celebration for him when he leaves.
get up to
to do (something bad). He's always getting up to mischief.

get up

يَنْهَضُ vstát rejse (sig) aufstehen σηκώνομαι levantarse nousta ylös se lever ustati alzarsi 起きる 일어나다 opstaan stå opp wstać levantar-se вставать stiga upp ลุกขึ้น kalkmak đứng dậy 起床
References in classic literature ?
I can't get up,' said the child, 'because my back's bad, and my legs are queer.
Her ideal of happiness was to have a girl to do the rough work so that she need not herself get up before seven.
I'm persistent in wantin' to get up which ary side my larder is; don't you see, all on yer?