get-rich-quick


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get-rich-quick

[ˌgetˌrɪtʃˈkwɪk] ADJ get-rich-quick schemeplan m para hacerse rico pronto, plan m para hacer una rápida fortuna
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There are not apt to be any get-rich-quick for- tunes made in corporations that issue no watered stock and do not capitalize their franchises.
He's renting a run-down room in his uncle Maurice's house, keeping his ex-wife and kids at arm's length androlling from one get-rich-quick scheme to the other with his pal Doc.
Karl says: "We've never deviated into any get-rich-quick schemes like some.
But somehow I don't think he'll be releasing a get-rich-quick book.
Around 1959, while young and working at a research and development lab, some colleagues and I formed an investment club and turned $10 into $5 with our young get-rich-quick mindsets and approaches.
So the poor, vulnerable and desperate are thrown to the get-rich-quick jackals.
We have to work on many levels to stop these get-rich-quick schemes, where people are digging for an illusion," Mansur Boreik, head of the Luxor antiquities department, told AFP.
Brits should realise that it is more of a lifestyle than a get-rich-quick destination, embrace it and it is far more satisfying than almost anything the UK has to offer.
Age Concern and North Tyneside Council have started a campaign to encourage residents to come forward if they receive bogus letters or emails, including fake lottery and prize draw wins, bogus psychic predictions and get-rich-quick investments.
Plus, a cemetery gets a high-rise tomb and other odd tales from around the world 37 THE JUDGE Experts warn that cash-for-gold deals advertised on TV can be more of a risky bet than a get-rich-quick scheme.
A NEW York cop in debt to loan sharks goes in search of a get-rich-quick scheme and decides to persuade his foster brother, who is also a fellow police officer, to help him rob a train carrying the day's takings for the city's subway network.
lt;p>Dubbed "Operation Short Change," the law enforcement sweep announced today includes 15 FTC cases, 44 law enforcement actions by the Department of Justice, and actions by at least 13 states against those looking to bilk consumers through a variety of schemes, such as promising non-existent jobs; promoting overhyped get-rich-quick plans, bogus government grants, and phony debt-reduction services; or putting unauthorized charges on consumers' credit or debit cards.