gibberish


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gib·ber·ish

 (jĭb′ər-ĭsh)
n.
1. Unintelligible or nonsensical talk or writing.
2.
a. Highly technical or esoteric language.
b. Unnecessarily pretentious or vague language.

[Probably from gibber + -ish.]

gibberish

(ˈdʒɪbərɪʃ)
n
1. rapid chatter like that of monkeys
2. incomprehensible talk; nonsense

gib•ber•ish

(ˈdʒɪb ər ɪʃ, ˈgɪb-)

n.
1. meaningless or unintelligible talk or writing; nonsense.
2. talk or writing containing many obscure, pretentious, or technical words.
[1545–55; appar. gibber + -ish1]

Gibberish

 

abracadabra See MAGIC.

Dutch Unintelligible gibberish, meaningless talk or writing; also, double Dutch; often in the phrase it’s Dutch to me. The allusion is probably to the meaningless jumble of sounds any foreign language seems to those who do not understand it. High Dutch was apparently the oldest variant of this expression since it appeared in the earliest OED citation from 1789; however, Dutch and double Dutch are the only forms in use today. An illustration of the use of this term is found in Charles Had-don Spurgeon’s Sermons (1879):

The preacher preaches double Dutch or Greek, or something of the sort.

Greek Gibberish, unintelligible or meaningless language; usually in the phrase it’s Greek to me. The allusion is most likely to the unintelligible and senseless sound of any foreign language to those who do not understand it. The expression dates from about 1600; it is found in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar:

But, for my own part, it was Greek to me. (I, ii)

mumbo jumbo Meaningless chanting and ritual; nonsensical or pretentious language. This expression evolved as an English rendering for the African deity Mama Dyumbo, whom the Mandingo tribes venerated with mystical rites incomprehensible to the European explorers. The expression is now frequently used to describe senseless or ostentatious language contrived to obscure a topic or befuddle the listener.

A mumbo jumbo of meaningless words and phrases. (Times, May, 1955)

ubble-gubble Nonsensical talk, drivel, prattle. This uncommon expression, perhaps derived as a rendering of inarticulate vocalizations, appeared in W. B. Johnson’s Widening Stain (1942).

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gibberish - unintelligible talkinggibberish - unintelligible talking    
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
abracadabra - gibberish and nonsense
babble, babbling, lallation - gibberish resembling the sounds of a baby
blather, blatherskite - foolish gibberish
double Dutch - an incomprehensible talk
double talk - deliberately unintelligible gibberish
gabble, jabber, jabbering - rapid and indistinct speech
mumbo jumbo - language or ritual causing, or intending to cause, confusion

gibberish

noun nonsense, balls (taboo slang), bull (slang), shit (taboo slang), crap (slang), garbage (informal), jargon, bullshit (taboo slang), hot air (informal), tosh (slang, chiefly Brit.), babble, pap, cobblers (Brit. taboo slang), bilge (informal), drivel, twaddle, tripe (informal), guff (slang), prattle, mumbo jumbo, moonshine, jabber, gabble, gobbledegook (informal), hogwash, hokum (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), blather, double talk, piffle (informal), all Greek (informal), poppycock (informal), balderdash, bosh (informal), yammer (informal), eyewash (informal), tommyrot, horsefeathers (U.S. slang), bunkum or buncombe (chiefly U.S.) When he did speak to her, he spoke gibberish.

gibberish

noun
2. Unintelligible or nonsensical talk or language:
3. Esoteric, formulaic, and often incomprehensible speech relating to the occult:
Translations
بَرْبَرَه، رَطانَه
безсмислициглупости
plácání
nonsensvolapyk
hepreasiansaksa
ג'יבריש
badarságérthetetlen beszédzagyvaság
òvaîur, bull
ちんぷんかんぷん
난센스
bełkotjazgot
nonsens
anlamsız sözlersaçma

gibberish

[ˈdʒɪbərɪʃ] Ngalimatías m inv, guirigay m

gibberish

[ˈdʒɪbərɪʃ] ncharabia m
to talk gibberish → bredouiller

gibberish

nQuatsch m (inf); (= foreign language, baby’s gibberish)Kauderwelsch nt

gibberish

[ˈdʒɪbərɪʃ] nparole fpl senza senso

gibber

(ˈdʒibə) verb
to make meaningless noises. He was gibbering with fear.
ˈgibberish (-riʃ) noun
nonsense. His explanations are just gibberish to me.
References in classic literature ?
Dickon always spoke it to the robin himself, so the queer gibberish he used when he spoke to humans did not matter in the least.
and thus an old idolator at heart, he yet lived among these Christians, wore their clothes, and tried to talk their gibberish.
He suddenly left the cabin, and I heard him in violent controversy with some one, who seemed to me to talk gibberish in response to him.
I suppose the reader never makes nonsense rhymes from sheer gladness of heart,--nursery doggerel to keep time with the rippling of the stream, or the dancing of the sun, or the beating of his heart; the gibberish of delight.
To Lady Arabella it sounded mere gibberish, but it was in his own dialect, and meant love, marriage, wife.
We crowded round, and over Miss Cathy's head I had a peep at a dirty, ragged, black-haired child; big enough both to walk and talk: indeed, its face looked older than Catherine's; yet when it was set on its feet, it only stared round, and repeated over and over again some gibberish that nobody could understand.
All this was Greek or gibberish to the peasants, but not so to the students, who very soon perceived the crack in Don Quixote's pate; for all that, however, they regarded him with admiration and respect, and one of them said to him, "If you, sir knight, have no fixed road, as it is the way with those who seek adventures not to have any, let your worship come with us; you will see one of the finest and richest weddings that up to this day have ever been celebrated in La Mancha, or for many a league round.
As he continued his harangue, however, Kory-Kory, in emulation of our more polished orators, began to launch out rather diffusely into other branches of his subject, enlarging probably upon the moral reflections it suggested; and proceeded in such a strain of unintelligible and stunning gibberish, that he actually gave me the headache for the rest of the day.
And it's another thing to take down the gibberish of a maundering mad monster who ought to be kept in a cage.
No, I have not learnt it," said Gerda; "but my grandmother understands it, and she can speak gibberish too.
Sister," cries the squire, "I have often warn'd you not to talk the court gibberish to me.
On the sidewalk Soapy began to yell drunken gibberish at the top of his harsh voice.