giddy


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gid·dy

 (gĭd′ē)
adj. gid·di·er, gid·di·est
1.
a. Having a reeling, lightheaded sensation; dizzy.
b. Causing or capable of causing dizziness: a giddy climb to the topmast.
2. Frivolous and lighthearted; flighty: was giddy with excitement at the news.
intr. & tr.v. gid·died, gid·dy·ing, gid·dies
To become or make giddy.

[Middle English gidi, crazy, from Old English gidig; see gheu(ə)- in Indo-European roots.]

gid′di·ly adv.
gid′di·ness n.
Word History: Though little trace of a divine provenance can be discerned in its modern meaning, giddy is derived from the same ancient Germanic word (*gudam) that has given us the word God. The Germanic word *gudigaz, formed from the word *gudam, meant "possessed by a god." Such possession can be a rather unbalancing experience, and so it is not surprising that the Old English descendant of *gudigaz, gidig, meant "mad, possessed by an evil spirit," or that the Middle English development of gidig, gidi, meant the same thing, as well as "foolish," "mad (used of an animal)," "dizzy," and "uncertain, unstable." Our sense "lighthearted, frivolous" represents the ultimate secularization of giddy.

giddy

(ˈɡɪdɪ)
adj, -dier or -diest
1. affected with a reeling sensation and feeling as if about to fall; dizzy
2. causing or tending to cause vertigo
3. impulsive; scatterbrained
4. my giddy aunt an exclamation of surprise
vb, -dies, -dying or -died
to make or become giddy
[Old English gydig mad, frenzied, possessed by God; related to God]
ˈgiddily adv
ˈgiddiness n

gid•dy

(ˈgɪd i)

adj. -di•er, -di•est, adj.
1. affected with vertigo; dizzy.
2. attended with or causing dizziness: a giddy climb.
3. frivolous and lighthearted; impulsive; flighty.
v.t., v.i.
4. to make or become giddy.
[before 1000; Middle English gidy, Old English gidig mad (as variant of *gydig), derivative of god God, presumably orig. “possessed by a divine being”]
gid′di•ly, adv.
gid′di•ness, n.

giddy


Past participle: giddied
Gerund: giddying

Imperative
giddy
giddy
Present
I giddy
you giddy
he/she/it giddies
we giddy
you giddy
they giddy
Preterite
I giddied
you giddied
he/she/it giddied
we giddied
you giddied
they giddied
Present Continuous
I am giddying
you are giddying
he/she/it is giddying
we are giddying
you are giddying
they are giddying
Present Perfect
I have giddied
you have giddied
he/she/it has giddied
we have giddied
you have giddied
they have giddied
Past Continuous
I was giddying
you were giddying
he/she/it was giddying
we were giddying
you were giddying
they were giddying
Past Perfect
I had giddied
you had giddied
he/she/it had giddied
we had giddied
you had giddied
they had giddied
Future
I will giddy
you will giddy
he/she/it will giddy
we will giddy
you will giddy
they will giddy
Future Perfect
I will have giddied
you will have giddied
he/she/it will have giddied
we will have giddied
you will have giddied
they will have giddied
Future Continuous
I will be giddying
you will be giddying
he/she/it will be giddying
we will be giddying
you will be giddying
they will be giddying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been giddying
you have been giddying
he/she/it has been giddying
we have been giddying
you have been giddying
they have been giddying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been giddying
you will have been giddying
he/she/it will have been giddying
we will have been giddying
you will have been giddying
they will have been giddying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been giddying
you had been giddying
he/she/it had been giddying
we had been giddying
you had been giddying
they had been giddying
Conditional
I would giddy
you would giddy
he/she/it would giddy
we would giddy
you would giddy
they would giddy
Past Conditional
I would have giddied
you would have giddied
he/she/it would have giddied
we would have giddied
you would have giddied
they would have giddied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.giddy - having or causing a whirling sensationgiddy - having or causing a whirling sensation; liable to falling; "had a dizzy spell"; "a dizzy pinnacle"; "had a headache and felt giddy"; "a giddy precipice"; "feeling woozy from the blow on his head"; "a vertiginous climb up the face of the cliff"
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"
2.giddy - lacking seriousnessgiddy - lacking seriousness; given to frivolity; "a dizzy blonde"; "light-headed teenagers"; "silly giggles"
frivolous - not serious in content or attitude or behavior; "a frivolous novel"; "a frivolous remark"; "a frivolous young woman"

giddy

adjective
1. dizzy, reeling, faint, unsteady, light-headed, vertiginous He felt giddy and light-headed.

giddy

adjective
1. Having a sensation of whirling or falling:
2. Producing dizziness or vertigo:
Translations
مُصاب بِدُوار
působící závraťtrpící závratí
svimmel
svima-
galvos sukimasissu apsvaigusia galvasvaigus
apreibisreibinošs
majúci pocit závratu
omotičen
başı dönen

giddy

1 [ˈgɪdɪ] ADJ (giddier (compar) (giddiest (superl))) (= dizzy) → mareado; (= causing dizziness) [height, speed] → vertiginoso; (of character) → atolondrado, ligero de cascos
to feel giddysentirse mareado
it makes me giddyme marea, me da vértigo

giddy

2 [ˈgɪdɪ] EXCL giddy up! (to horse) → ¡arre!

giddy

[ˈgɪdi] adj
(= dizzy) [person] to be giddy → avoir la tête qui tourne
to feel giddy → avoir la tête qui tourne
to feel giddy with excitement → ne plus tenir en place
[height] → vertigineux/euse
(= thoughtless) → étourdi(e)

giddy

adj (+er)
(lit: = dizzy) → schwind(e)lig; giddy spellsSchwindelanfälle pl; I feel giddymir ist schwind(e)lig; it makes me feel giddymir wird (davon) schwind(e)lig; heights always make me giddyich bin nicht schwindelfrei
(= causing dizziness) climb, speedschwindelerregend; heightsschwindelerregend, schwindelnd (also fig); spinrasend schnell
(fig: = heedless, not serious) → leichtfertig, flatterhaft; (= excited)ausgelassen; their life was one giddy round of pleasureihr Leben bestand nur aus Jubel, Trubel, Heiterkeit; she was giddy with excitementsie war vor Aufregung ganz aus dem Häuschen (inf); that’s the giddy limit! (dated inf)das ist wirklich der Gipfel or die Höhe!

giddy

[ˈgɪdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (dizzy) to be giddyaver le vertigini; (causing dizziness, height) → vertiginoso/a; (speed) → folle
I feel giddy → mi gira la testa

giddy

(ˈgidi) adjective
feeling that one is going to fall over, or that everything is spinning round. I was dancing round so fast that I felt quite giddy; a giddy feeling.
ˈgiddily adverb
ˈgiddiness noun

giddy

adj (comp -dier; super -diest) mareado
References in classic literature ?
Selma was a studious girl, who had not much tolerance for giddy things like Tiny and Lena; but they always spoke of her with admiration.
I felt giddy and almost overcome," Edna said, lifting her hands instinctively to her head and pushing her straw hat up from her forehead.
A form stood at the brow of the mountain, on the very edge of the giddy height, with uplifted arms, in an awful attitude of menace.
In the feverish, pulsating life of the young metropolis they often stopped oppressed, giddy, and choking; the roar of the streets and thoroughfares was meaningless to them, except to revive strange memories of the deep, unvarying monotone of the evening wind over their humbler roof on the Sierran hillside.
Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there's naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah's prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.
When George entered the shed, he felt his head giddy and his heart sick.
She reeled just then, giddy with fatigue, and down came the lash and flicked a flake of skin from her naked shoulder.
These people moved in single file, and were all tied to a strong rope, at regular distances apart, so that if one of them slipped on those giddy heights, the others could brace themselves on their alpenstocks and save him from darting into the valley, thousands of feet below.
When Jeff arrived, Tom accosted him; and "led up" warily to opportunities for remark about Becky, but the giddy lad never could see the bait.
Jennings, with a thoroughly good-humoured concern for its cause, admitted the excuse most readily, and Elinor, after seeing her safe off, returned to Marianne, whom she found attempting to rise from the bed, and whom she reached just in time to prevent her from falling on the floor, faint and giddy from a long want of proper rest and food; for it was many days since she had any appetite, and many nights since she had really slept; and now, when her mind was no longer supported by the fever of suspense, the consequence of all this was felt in an aching head, a weakened stomach, and a general nervous faintness.
I did, and I could not quite comprehend it: it made me giddy.
He was about to enlarge further, but the two youngsters broke into a noisy fit of merriment: my giddy miss being delighted to discover that she might turn his strange talk to matter of amusement.