gig


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gig1

gig 1

 (gĭg)
n.
1. A light, two-wheeled carriage drawn by one horse.
2. Nautical
a. A long light ship's boat, usually reserved for use by the ship's captain.
b. A fast light rowboat.
3.
a. An object that whirls.
b. Games A three-digit selection in a numbers game.
intr.v. gigged, gig·ging, gigs
To ride in a gig.

[Perhaps from obsolete gig, spinning top, from Middle English gyg-, possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

gig 2

 (gĭg)
n.
1. An arrangement of barbless hooks that is dragged through a school of fish to hook them in their bodies.
2. A pronged spear for fishing or catching frogs.
v. gigged, gig·ging, gigs
v.tr.
To fish for or catch with a gig.
v.intr.
To catch a fish or frog with a gig.

[Short for fishgig.]

gig 3

 (gĭg) Slang
n.
A demerit given in the military.
tr.v. gigged, gig·ging, gigs
To give a military demerit to.

[Origin unknown.]

gig 4

 (gĭg) Slang
n.
A job, especially a booking for musicians.
intr.v. gigged, gig·ging, gigs
To work as a musician: "gigging weekends as a piano player in the ski joints" (Joel Oppenheimer).

[Origin unknown.]

gig 5

 (gĭg, jĭg)
n. Informal
A gigabyte.

gig

(ɡɪɡ)
n
1. (Automotive Engineering) a light two-wheeled one-horse carriage without a hood
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a light tender for a vessel, often for the personal use of the captain
3. (Rowing) a long light rowing boat, used esp for racing
4. (Textiles) a machine for raising the nap of a fabric
vb, gigs, gigging or gigged
5. (Automotive Engineering) (intr) to travel in a gig
6. (Textiles) (tr) to raise the nap of (fabric)
[C13 (in the sense: flighty girl, spinning top): perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish gig top, Norwegian giga to shake about]

gig

(ɡɪɡ)
n
1. (Angling) a cluster of barbless hooks drawn through a shoal of fish to try to impale them
2. (Angling) short for fishgig
vb, gigs, gigging or gigged
(Angling) to catch (fish) with a gig
[C18: shortened from fishgig]

gig

(ɡɪɡ)
n
1. (Music, other) a job, esp a single booking for a musician, comedian, etc, to perform at a concert or club
2. (Music, other) the performance itself
vb, gigs, gigging or gigged
(Music, other) (intr) to perform at a gig or gigs
[C20: of unknown origin]

gig

(ɡɪɡ)
n
(Computer Science) informal short for gigabyte

gig1

(gɪg)

n., v. gigged, gig•ging. n.
1. a light, two-wheeled one-horse carriage.
2. a light boat rowed with four, six, or eight long oars.
3. something that whirls.
v.i.
4. to ride in a gig.
[1200–50; Middle English gigge, gig flighty girl; akin to Dan gig top]

gig2

(gɪg)

n., v. gigged, gig•ging. n.
1. a device, commonly four hooks secured back to back, for dragging through a school of fish to hook them through the body.
2. a spearlike device with a long, thick handle, used for spearing fish and frogs.
v.t.
3. to catch or spear (a fish or frog) with a gig.
v.i.
4. to catch fish or frogs with a gig.
[1715–25; shortened from fishgig, variant of fizgig a kind of harpoon]

gig3

(gɪg)

n., v. gigged, gig•ging. n.
1. a military demerit.
v.t.
2. to give a gig to.
[1940–45; orig. uncertain]

gig4

(gɪg)

n., v. gigged, gig•ging. Slang. n.
1. a single professional engagement, usu. of short duration, as of jazz or rock musicians.
2. any job, esp. one of short or uncertain duration.
v.i.
3. to work as a musician, esp. in a single engagement.
[1925–30; orig. uncertain]

gig


Past participle: gigged
Gerund: gigging

Imperative
gig
gig
Present
I gig
you gig
he/she/it gigs
we gig
you gig
they gig
Preterite
I gigged
you gigged
he/she/it gigged
we gigged
you gigged
they gigged
Present Continuous
I am gigging
you are gigging
he/she/it is gigging
we are gigging
you are gigging
they are gigging
Present Perfect
I have gigged
you have gigged
he/she/it has gigged
we have gigged
you have gigged
they have gigged
Past Continuous
I was gigging
you were gigging
he/she/it was gigging
we were gigging
you were gigging
they were gigging
Past Perfect
I had gigged
you had gigged
he/she/it had gigged
we had gigged
you had gigged
they had gigged
Future
I will gig
you will gig
he/she/it will gig
we will gig
you will gig
they will gig
Future Perfect
I will have gigged
you will have gigged
he/she/it will have gigged
we will have gigged
you will have gigged
they will have gigged
Future Continuous
I will be gigging
you will be gigging
he/she/it will be gigging
we will be gigging
you will be gigging
they will be gigging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gigging
you have been gigging
he/she/it has been gigging
we have been gigging
you have been gigging
they have been gigging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gigging
you will have been gigging
he/she/it will have been gigging
we will have been gigging
you will have been gigging
they will have been gigging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gigging
you had been gigging
he/she/it had been gigging
we had been gigging
you had been gigging
they had been gigging
Conditional
I would gig
you would gig
he/she/it would gig
we would gig
you would gig
they would gig
Past Conditional
I would have gigged
you would have gigged
he/she/it would have gigged
we would have gigged
you would have gigged
they would have gigged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gig - long and light rowing boat; especially for racing
small boat - a boat that is small
2.gig - an implement with a shaft and barbed point used for catching fish
fishing gear, fishing rig, fishing tackle, tackle, rig - gear used in fishing
harpoon - a spear with a shaft and barbed point for throwing; used for catching large fish or whales; a strong line is attached to it
implement - instrumentation (a piece of equipment or tool) used to effect an end
leister - a spear with three or more prongs; used for spearing fish (especially salmon)
3.gig - a cluster of hooks (without barbs) that is drawn through a school of fish to hook their bodies; used when fish are not biting
fishing gear, fishing rig, fishing tackle, tackle, rig - gear used in fishing
hook - a curved or bent implement for suspending or pulling something
4.gig - tender that is a light ship's boat; often for personal use of captain
pinnace, ship's boat, cutter, tender - a boat for communication between ship and shore
5.gig - small two-wheeled horse-drawn carriage; with two seats and no hood
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
6.gig - a booking for musicians; "they played a gig in New Jersey"
booking, engagement - employment for performers or performing groups that lasts for a limited period of time; "the play had bookings throughout the summer"

gig

noun show, production, appearance, presentation The two bands join forces for a gig at the Sheffield Arena.

gig

noun
1. Slang. A post of employment:
2. Slang. A commitment, as for a performance by an entertainer:
Translations
atrainkeikkakeikkaillakiesitkiusata
koncert

gig

[gɪg] N
1. (= carriage) → calesa f
2. (Naut) → lancha f, canoa f
3. (Mus) → actuación f, concierto m
4. (US) (= job) → trabajo m temporal

gig

[ˈgɪg] n
(= concert) → concert f
(= performance) → spectacle m

gig

n
(= carriage, boat)Gig nt
(inf: = concert) → Konzert nt, → Gig m (inf); (of comedian, singer, group) → Auftritt m; to do a gigein Konzert geben, auftreten
(US: = temporary job) → Job m
viauftreten

gig

[gɪg] n (fam) (of musician) → serata
References in classic literature ?
My mother always took him to the town on a market day in a light gig.
I won't keep dinner waiting; if the return train doesn't suit, I'll borrow a gig and get back in that way.
My dear child, he'll have a beautiful nap in the gig, for I shall drive.
This surmise was confirmed, as presently,--over the brow of a distant undulation in the road, I descried a farmer's gig driven by another young woman.
A gig was coming along the road; it was driven by Mr.
He was an authority on the stage, skilful on the ice or the links with skate or golf-club; he dressed with nice audacity, and, to put the finishing touch upon his glory, he kept a gig and a strong trotting-horse.
Constans, who was "seen by the captain to jump into the gig,"
The gig was already lowered, and in it were four oarsmen and a coxswain.
The last adieus were hastily exchanged, and Anna Miller was handed into her father's gig by Charles Weston in profound silence.
Her elder sister Letitia, who had a prouder style of beauty, and a more worldly ambition, was engaged to a wool-factor, who came all the way from Cattelton to see her; and everybody knows that a wool-factor takes a very high rank, sometimes driving a double-bodied gig.
Crimsworth intimated to me that they were bringing the gig round to the door, and that in five minutes he should expect me to be ready to go down with him to X .
One bright afternoon, a gig, gaily bedizened with streamers, was observed to shove off from the side of one of the French frigates, and pull directly for our gangway.