gigantomachy


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gigantomachy

(ˌdʒaɪɡænˈtɒməkɪ) or

gigantomachia

n, pl -chies or -chias
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the war fought between the gods of Olympus and the rebelling giants. See giant3
2. any battle fought between or as if between giants
[C17: from Greek gigantomakhia, from gigas giant + makhē battle]

gigantomachy

1. a war between giants, as in mythology.
2. war between large contestants, as major powers.
See also: War
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pride of place, and the opening and closing example, is the Gigantomachy Frieze reconstructed into the Great Altar of Zeus in the Pergamon room, but the book sets this in the context of both the politics and poetics of the other museums in Berlin, the archaeological expeditions that produced the materials, and the wider context of intellectual debates and differences largely between French and Prussian ideologies.
The example of the gigantomachy display reveals the almost Escher-like spatial contortions used to produce that most stunning and solid of representations for the viewer.
Butler, George E "Giants and Fallen Angels in Dante and Milton: The Commedia and the Gigantomachy in Paradise Lost.
There is a distinct irony at play in associating a battle of wills between two evenly matched individuals to the cosmic chaos associated with the Gigantomachy.
And, in fact, the Gigantomachy pervades Claudian's other writings.
Dante alludes to the classical Gigantomachy several times in the Commedia.
Dante's brief rejection of the myth of Typhoeus being buried under Aetna undermines the myth of the classical Gigantomachy.
In the Bibliotheca, Apollodorus discusses the Gigantomachy more extensively.
Thus in the Purgatorio, while Dante may have remembered portions of the Titanomachy, in which the Titans battle Jove and Briareos casts them into Tartarus, he more particularly alludes to the Gigantomachy, the later mythological war in which earth gives birth to new children, the Giants who seek to topple Jove from Olympus.
The most extensive account of the battle of the gods and Giants is Claudian's unfinished Latin Gigantomachy.
the gigantomachy, related by many Greek and Roman poets.
It is not immediately obvious that the Stranger's example--man and his predicates--is significant; we cannot but wonder, however, whether there is not a connection between the recourse to speeches and the citation of man, especially since they appear together after his own gigantomachy.