gill


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gill1
A fish breathes by swallowing water and passing it through gill slits on each side of its head. Blood-filled filaments on the gills extract oxygen from the water as it flows through.

gill 1

 (gĭl)
n.
1. Zoology The respiratory organ of most aquatic animals that obtain oxygen from water, consisting of a filamentous structure of vascular membranes across which dissolved gases are exchanged.
2.
a. often gills The wattle of a bird.
b. gills Informal The area around the chin and neck.
3. Botany One of the thin, platelike structures on the underside of the cap of a mushroom or similar fungus.
v. gilled, gill·ing, gills
v.tr.
1. To catch (fish) in a gill net.
2. To gut or clean (fish).
v.intr.
To become entangled in a gill net. Used of fish.
Idiom:
to the gills Informal
As full as possible; completely.

[Middle English gile, of Scandinavian origin.]

gilled adj.

gill 2

 (jĭl)
n. Abbr. gi or gi.
1. A unit of volume or capacity in the US Customary System, used in liquid measure, equal to 1/4 of a pint or four ounces (118 milliliters).
2. A unit of volume or capacity, used in dry and liquid measure, equal to 1/4 of a British Imperial pint (142 milliliters).

[Middle English gille, from Old French, wine measure, from Late Latin gillō, vessel for cooling liquids.]

gill 3

 (gĭl)
n. Chiefly British
1. A ravine.
2. A narrow stream.

[Middle English gille, from Old Norse gil.]

gill 4

also jill or Gill  (jĭl)
n. Obsolete
A girl, often one's sweetheart.

[Middle English gille, from Gille, a woman's name.]

gill

(ɡɪl)
n
1. (Zoology) the respiratory organ in many aquatic animals, consisting of a membrane or outgrowth well supplied with blood vessels. External gills occur in tadpoles, some molluscs, etc; internal gills, within gill slits, occur in most fishes.
2. (Botany) any of the radiating leaflike spore-producing structures on the undersurface of the cap of a mushroom
vb
3. (Angling) to catch (fish) or (of fish) to be caught in a gill net
4. (Angling) (tr) to gut (fish)
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish gäl, Danish gjælle, Greek khelunē lip]
gilled adj
ˈgill-less adj
ˈgill-ˌlike adj

gill

(dʒɪl)
n
1. (Units) a unit of liquid measure equal to one quarter of a pint
2. dialect Northern English half a pint, esp of beer
[C14: from Old French gille vat, tub, from Late Latin gillō cooling vessel for liquids, of obscure origin]

gill

(ɡɪl) or

ghyll

n
1. (Physical Geography) a narrow stream; rivulet
2. (Physical Geography) a wooded ravine
3. (Physical Geography) (capital when part of place name) a deep natural hole in rock; pothole: Gaping Gill.
[C11: from Old Norse gil steep-sided valley]

gill

(dʒɪl)
n
1. archaic a girl or sweetheart
2. (Animals) dialect a female ferret. Also spelt: jill
3. (Plants) an archaic or dialect name for ground ivy
[C15: special use of Gill, short for Gillian, girl's name]

Gill

(ɡɪl)
n
(Biography) (Arthur) Eric (Rowton). 1882–1940, British sculptor, engraver, and typographer: his sculptures include the Stations of the Cross in Westminster Cathedral, London

gill1

(gɪl)

n.
1. the respiratory organ of aquatic animals, as fish, that breathe oxygen dissolved in water.
2. one of the radial plates that bear spores on the underside of the cap of certain mushrooms.
Idioms:
1. green or white around the gills, somewhat pale, as from nausea or fright.
2. to the gills, Informal. fully; completely; to capacity.
[1300–50; < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse gjǫlnar]

gill2

(dʒɪl)

n.
a unit of liquid measure equal to ¼ of a pint (118.2937 ml).
[1225–75; Middle English gille < Old French: vat, tub < Late Latin gello, gillo water pot]

gill3

(gɪl)

n. Brit.
1. ravine.
2. a rivulet.
[1350–1400; < Old Norse gil]

gill4

(dʒɪl)

n.
a girl or young woman; sweetheart.
[1400–50; late Middle English, generic use of Gil(le), short form of a female given name, Gillian]
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gill
Fish breathe by swallowing water and passing it through gill slits on each side of their head. Blood-filled filaments on the gills extract oxygen from the water as it flows through.

gill

(gĭl)
1. The organ that enables most aquatic animals to take oxygen from the water. It consists of a series of membranes that have many small blood vessels. Oxygen passes into the bloodstream and carbon dioxide passes out of it as water passes across the membranes.
2. One of the thin, plate-like structures on the underside of the cap of a mushroom or similar fungus.

gill


Past participle: gilled
Gerund: gilling

Imperative
gill
gill
Present
I gill
you gill
he/she/it gills
we gill
you gill
they gill
Preterite
I gilled
you gilled
he/she/it gilled
we gilled
you gilled
they gilled
Present Continuous
I am gilling
you are gilling
he/she/it is gilling
we are gilling
you are gilling
they are gilling
Present Perfect
I have gilled
you have gilled
he/she/it has gilled
we have gilled
you have gilled
they have gilled
Past Continuous
I was gilling
you were gilling
he/she/it was gilling
we were gilling
you were gilling
they were gilling
Past Perfect
I had gilled
you had gilled
he/she/it had gilled
we had gilled
you had gilled
they had gilled
Future
I will gill
you will gill
he/she/it will gill
we will gill
you will gill
they will gill
Future Perfect
I will have gilled
you will have gilled
he/she/it will have gilled
we will have gilled
you will have gilled
they will have gilled
Future Continuous
I will be gilling
you will be gilling
he/she/it will be gilling
we will be gilling
you will be gilling
they will be gilling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gilling
you have been gilling
he/she/it has been gilling
we have been gilling
you have been gilling
they have been gilling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gilling
you will have been gilling
he/she/it will have been gilling
we will have been gilling
you will have been gilling
they will have been gilling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gilling
you had been gilling
he/she/it had been gilling
we had been gilling
you had been gilling
they had been gilling
Conditional
I would gill
you would gill
he/she/it would gill
we would gill
you would gill
they would gill
Past Conditional
I would have gilled
you would have gilled
he/she/it would have gilled
we would have gilled
you would have gilled
they would have gilled

gill

A unit of liquid volume. In the UK, 1 gill = 1⁄4 UK pt; in US (gi), 1 gi = 1⁄4 US fl pt. The two should not be confused: 1 UK gill = 1⁄2 US gi.

Gill

A unit of liquid volume. One gill equals one-quarter pint.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gill - a British imperial capacity unit (liquid or dry) equal to 5 fluid ounces or 142.066 cubic centimeters
British capacity unit, Imperial capacity unit - a unit of measure for capacity officially adopted in the British Imperial System; British units are both dry and wet
fluid ounce, fluidounce - a British imperial unit of capacity or volume (liquid or dry) equal to 8 fluid drams or 28.416 cubic centimeters (1.734 cubic inches)
pint - a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 4 gills or 568.26 cubic centimeters
2.gill - a United States liquid unit equal to 4 fluid ounces
United States liquid unit - a liquid unit officially adopted in the United States Customary System
fluid ounce, fluidounce - a United States unit of capacity or volume equal to 1.804 cubic inches
cup - a United States liquid unit equal to 8 fluid ounces
3.gill - any of the radiating leaflike spore-producing structures on the underside of the cap of a mushroom or similar fungus
plant organ - a functional and structural unit of a plant or fungus
4.gill - respiratory organ of aquatic animals that breathe oxygen dissolved in water
ctenidium - comb-like respiratory structure serving as the gill of certain mollusks
ceras - one of the often brightly colored and branching hornlike structures on the back of the nudibranch (and other related mollusks) that serve as gills
external gill - occurs in some mollusks and in tadpoles and other immature amphibians
respiratory organ - any organ involved in the process of respiration

gill

noun
Related words
adjective branchial
Translations
خَيْشومورقة الفِطر
žábrylupeny
gælleskive
helttakidukset
škrga
kopoltyúsugárlemez
insang
blaî eîa riftálkn
lakšteliaižiaunos
lapiņažauna
lupenežiabre
škrgaшкрга
mantar altı levhacıklarısolungaç

gill

1 [gɪl] N [of fish] → branquia f, agalla f
to look green about the gillstener mala cara

gill

2 [dʒɪl] N (= measure) → cuarta parte f de una pinta (= 0,142 litro)

gill

1
n (of fish)Kieme f; green about the gills (inf)blass um die Nase (inf)

gill

2
n (= measure)Gill nt (0,148 l)

gill

1 [gɪl] n (of fish) → branchia
to be green around the gills (fig) (fam) → essere verde per la paura

gill

2 [dʒɪl] n (measure) → 0,142 l

gill

(gil) noun
1. one of the openings on the side of a fish's head through which it breathes.
2. a leaf-like structure on the lower side of the top of a mushroom.
gill cover
a fold of skin protecting the gills.
References in classic literature ?
She was a commoner, and had been sent here on her bridal night by Sir Breuse Sance Pite, a neighboring lord whose vassal her father was, and to which said lord she had refused what has since been called le droit du seigneur, and, moreover, had opposed violence to violence and spilt half a gill of his almost sacred blood.
He must have drunk a gill before he took the bottle from his mouth.
shouted Manuel, stooping to the fish, and bringing one up with a finger under its gill and a finger in its eye.
The Frenchman had given these small-clothes to an Indian powwow, who parted with them to the old witch for a gill of strong waters, at one of their dances in the forest.
Gill, Eugene Didier, Sarah Helen Whitman and others these scandals have been dispelled and Poe is seen as he actually was-not as a man without failings, it is true, but as the finest and most original genius in American letters.
There was Gill o' the Red Cap, the Sheriff's own head archer, and Diccon Cruikshank of Lincoln Town, and Adam o' the Dell, a man of Tamworth, of threescore years and more, yet hale and lusty still, who in his time had shot in the famous match at Woodstock, and had there beaten that renowned archer, Clym o' the Clough.
Here there lies a grove of trees, marked as the `Ragged Shaw,' and on the farther side stretches a great rolling moor, Lower Gill Moor, extending for ten miles and sloping gradually upward.
Looking through the pages he found the recipe he wanted and said: "I must have a gill of water from a dark well.
But so long goes the pot to the water, men say, at last comes it home broken," cries Gill.
Gill told me, he had been employed professionally to examine one: he found the passage low, narrow, crooked, and not of uniform breadth, but of very considerable length.
Wordsworth's obstinate adherence to his theory in its full extent, indeed, produced such trivial and absurd results as 'Goody Blake and Harry Gill,' 'The Idiot Boy,' and 'Peter Bell,' and great masses of hopeless prosiness in his long blank-verse narratives.
You will stand at the altar when your time comes, with Brown and Jones, Nokes and Styles, Jack and Gill.