gimmick


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gim·mick

 (gĭm′ĭk)
n.
1.
a. An innovative idea or stratagem that is used to attract attention or business but has little or no intrinsic value: "Mr. Freed tried every gimmick to attract customers, once even installing a traffic light in front of the restaurant to force cars to stop" (Sam Roberts).
b. A significant feature that is obscured, misrepresented, or not readily evident; a catch: This deal seems too good to be true. What's the gimmick?
2.
a. A device employed to cheat, deceive, or trick, especially a mechanism for the secret and dishonest control of gambling apparatus.
b. An innovative or unusual mechanical contrivance; a gadget.
3. A small object whose name does not come readily to mind.
tr.v. gim·micked, gim·mick·ing, gim·micks
1. To add gimmicks to; clutter with gadgets or attention-getting details. Often used with up.
2. To change or affect by means of a gimmick.

[Origin unknown.]

gim′mick·y adj.

gimmick

(ˈɡɪmɪk)
n
1. something designed to attract extra attention, interest, or publicity
2. any clever device, gadget, or stratagem, esp one used to deceive
3. (Theatre) chiefly US a device or trick of legerdemain that enables a magician to deceive the audience
[C20: originally US slang, of unknown origin]
ˈgimmickry n
ˈgimmicky adj

gim•mick

(ˈgɪm ɪk)
n.
1. an ingenious or novel device or stratagem, esp. one used to draw attention or increase appeal; stunt; ploy.
2. a concealed, usu. devious feature of something, as a plan or deal.
3. a hidden mechanical device by which a magician works a trick or a gambler controls a game of chance.
v.t.
4. to equip or embellish with unnecessary features (often fol. by up).
[1925–30]
gim′mick•y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gimmick - a drawback or difficulty that is not readily evidentgimmick - a drawback or difficulty that is not readily evident; "it sounds good but what's the catch?"
drawback - the quality of being a hindrance; "he pointed out all the drawbacks to my plan"
2.gimmick - something unspecified whose name is either forgotten or not knowngimmick - something unspecified whose name is either forgotten or not known; "she eased the ball-shaped doodad back into its socket"; "there may be some great new gizmo around the corner that you will want to use"
stuff - miscellaneous unspecified objects; "the trunk was full of stuff"
3.gimmick - any clever maneuver; "he would stoop to any device to win a point"; "it was a great sales gimmick"; "a cheap promotions gimmick for greedy businessmen"
tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre, maneuver, manoeuvre - a move made to gain a tactical end
mnemonic - a device (such as a rhyme or acronym) used to aid recall
fast one, trick - a cunning or deceitful action or device; "he played a trick on me"; "he pulled a fast one and got away with it"

gimmick

noun stunt, trick, device, scheme, manoeuvre, dodge, ploy, gambit, stratagem, contrivance It's just a public relations gimmick.

gimmick

noun
1. An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
2. A small specialized mechanical device:
Informal: doodad, doohickey, widget.
Slang: gizmo.
3. A clever, unexpected new trick or method:
Informal: kicker, wrinkle.
Slang: angle, kick.
Translations
حيلَه أو وسيلَه لِلَفْت الأنْظار
chytáknápadtrik
fidus
reklámfogás
brella
su triukaistriukas
triks
gimmick

gimmick

[ˈgɪmɪk] Ntruco m publicitario; (= gadget) → artilugio m
it's just a sales gimmickes un truco para vender más

gimmick

[ˈgɪmɪk] ntruc m
sales gimmick → astuce f pour faire vendre
It's just a public relations gimmick
BUT C'est juste un artifice de relations publiques.

gimmick

nGag m (inf); (in film etc) → effekthaschender Gag, Spielerei f; (= gadget)Spielerei f; an election gimmickein Wahltrick m; changing the name and not the product is just a (sales) gimmickden Namen, aber nicht das Produkt zu ändern, ist nur ein (Verkaufs)trick

gimmick

[ˈgɪmɪk] ntrovata
sales gimmick → trovata commerciale

gimmick

(ˈgimik) noun
something used to attract attention to something or someone. an advertising gimmick.
ˈgimmicky adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
12 (ANI): Union Minister Prakash Javadekar on Monday took a dig at the Congress president Rahul Gandhi for his relentless 'temple visits' while terming it an 'election gimmick.
WASHINGTON -- Pakistan's former US envoy Husain Haqqani rejected on Monday a police complaint against him as a media gimmick that should not be taken seriously.
YOU can't beat a good gimmick to make an otherwise tedious board game seem interesting.
When they started to have gimmick bookings like Ed Balls and then we had acts like Honey G, it was kind of tit for tat.
Bank Leumi first executive VP and digital banking division head, Tamar Yassur, said, 'I know that our competitors are saying that Pepper is a gimmick.
The LNPs wait time gimmick did nothing to help these people and if Tim Nicholls knew the first thing about the health system he would know that.
SNP deputy leader Stewart Hosie said the plan was "a silly gimmick by Danny Alexander and his Tory bosses".
Enter the gimmick, the advertising tactic that causes you to pull out your credit card so you too can own a knife that will slice a tin can in half.
If you want proof of how much of a gimmick they are, you only need to read about the latest supermarket boasting about selling loads more strawberries by renaming them Straw Murrays.
His latest gimmick of linking the minimum wage to average earnings demonstrates how economically inept he is.
I don't have the time or inclination to delve into the detail of this latest gimmick.
TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said: "The Chancellor's shares for rights gimmick may have cheered delegates at the Conservative Party conference but it could end up costing taxpayers hundreds of millions of pounds.