gingerbread


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gin·ger·bread

 (jĭn′jər-brĕd′)
n.
1.
a. A dark molasses cake flavored with ginger.
b. A molasses and ginger cookie cut in various shapes, sometimes elaborately decorated.
2.
a. Elaborate architectural ornamentation, as on the trim of gables and porches on a Victorian house.
b. Superfluous or tasteless embellishment.

[Middle English gingebred, a stiff pudding, preserved ginger, alteration (influenced by bred, bread, bread) of Old French gingembrat, from Medieval Latin *gingibrātum, from gingiber, ginger; see ginger.]

gin′ger·bread′ adj.
gin′ger·bread′y adj.

gingerbread

(ˈdʒɪndʒəˌbrɛd)
n
1. (Cookery) a moist brown cake, flavoured with ginger and treacle or syrup
2. (Cookery)
a. a rolled biscuit, similarly flavoured, cut into various shapes and sometimes covered with icing
b. (as modifier): gingerbread man.
3.
a. an elaborate but unsubstantial ornamentation
b. (as modifier): gingerbread style of architecture.

gin•ger•bread

(ˈdʒɪn dʒərˌbrɛd)

n.
1. a type of cake or fancifully shaped cookie flavored with ginger and molasses.
2. elaborate or superfluous architectural ornamentation.
adj.
3. heavily ornamented: a house with gingerbread trim.
[1250–1300]
gin′ger•bread′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gingerbread - cake flavored with gingergingerbread - cake flavored with ginger    
cake - baked goods made from or based on a mixture of flour, sugar, eggs, and fat
Translations
خُبْز الزَّنْجَبيل
perník
ingefærkage
gyömbérkenyér
piparkaka, smákaka skorin út í mynd
medovník
zencefilli kek

gingerbread

[ˈdʒɪndʒəbred] Npan m de jengibre

gingerbread

[ˈdʒɪndʒərbrɛd] npain m d'épicesginger cake ncake m au gingembreginger group n (British)groupe m de pressionginger-haired [ˌdʒɪndʒərˈhɛərd] adjroux(rousse)

gingerbread

[ˈdʒɪndʒəˌbrɛd] npan m pepato or di zenzero

ginger

(ˈdʒindʒə) noun
a hot-tasting root which is used as a spice.
adjective
1. flavoured with ginger.
2. reddish-brown in colour. a ginger cat.
ginger ale, ginger beer
a type of non-alcoholic drink flavoured with ginger.
ˈgingerbread noun
(a) cake flavoured with treacle and ginger.
References in classic literature ?
First walked a gingerbread man neatly formed and baked to a lovely brown tint.
Jim Crow, moreover, was seen executing his world-renowned dance, in gingerbread.
An episode of humour or kindness touches and amuses him here and there--a pretty child looking at a gingerbread stall; a pretty girl blushing whilst her lover talks to her and chooses her fairing; poor Tom Fool, yonder behind the waggon, mumbling his bone with the honest family which lives by his tumbling; but the general impression is one more melancholy than mirthful.
Pon my word," said Conseil, "it will be gingerbread.
No, I never cooked anything in my life except a gingerbread and it was a failure -- flat in the middle and hilly round the edges.
The only article in which Silas dealt, that was not hard, was gingerbread.
The German soldiers by the innumerable sentry-boxes looked strangely like German toys, and the clean-cut battlements of the castle, gilded by the sunshine, looked the more like the gilt gingerbread.
As I entered the kitchen, I sniffed a pleasant smell of gingerbread baking.
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
There sat the long-legged pauper, on his bed, in a very short shirt, and nothing more; he was dangling his legs contentedly back and forth, and wheezing the music of "Camptown Races" out of a paper-overlaid comb which he was pressing against his mouth; by him lay a new jewsharp, a new top, and solid india-rubber ball, a handful of painted marbles, five pounds of "store" candy, and a well-gnawed slab of gingerbread as big and as thick as a volume of sheet-music.
The Simpson twins stood in such awe of her that they could not be persuaded to come to the side door even when Miss Jane held gingerbread cookies in her outstretched hands.
On the front seat of the coach there was one of those small baskets in which travelling ladies who are too delicate to appear at a public table generally carry a supply of gingerbread, biscuits and cheese, cold ham, and other light refreshments, merely to sustain nature to the journey's end.