git


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git 1

(gĭt)
v. Chiefly New England, Midland US, & Southern US
Variant of get1.

git 2

(gĭt)
n. Chiefly British Slang
An unpleasant, contemptible, or frustratingly obtuse person.

[Variant of get, offspring, bastard, contemptible person; see get1.]

git

(ɡɪt)
n
1. a contemptible person, often a fool
2. a bastard
[C20: from get (in the sense: to beget, hence a bastard, fool)]

git

(gɪt)

v. Dial.
get.
pron: See get.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.git - a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptiblegit - a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptible; "only a rotter would do that"; "kill the rat"; "throw the bum out"; "you cowardly little pukes!"; "the British call a contemptible person a `git'"
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
Translations

git

[gɪt] N (Brit) → cretino/a m/f

git

[ˈgɪt] n (British)con(ne) m/f

git

n (inf: = stupid person) → Schwachkopf m, → Depp m (dial); a miserable old gitein alter Miesepeter (inf)
References in classic literature ?
The only way to git him to do anything is to coax him to do the opposite.
He always feels dretful tickled when I git a compliment.
Sometimes you gwyne to git hurt, en sometimes you gwyne to git sick; but every time you's gwyne to git well agin.
She makes me get up just at the same time every morning; she makes me wash, they comb me all to thunder; she won't let me sleep in the woodshed; I got to wear them blamed clothes that just smothers me, Tom; they don't seem to any air git through 'em, somehow; and they're so rotten nice that I can't set down, nor lay down, nor roll around anywher's; I hain't slid on a cellar-door for -- well, it 'pears to be years; I got to go to church and sweat and sweat -- I hate them ornery sermons
Well, I'd got to talk so nice it wasn't no comfort -- I'd got to go up in the attic and rip out awhile, every day, to git a taste in my mouth, or I'd a died, Tom.
We thought we'd lost forty-two men by straight count, but if they keep on a-comin' this way, we'll git th' comp'ny all back by mornin' yit.
Pap's so po' he cain't run me no mo', so I want to git a show somers if I kin, 'taint no diffunce what--I'm strong and hearty, and I don't turn my back on no kind of work, hard nur soft.
Now you've had all you can stan' to-night, poor little soul, without gettin' a fit o' sickness; an' Mirandy'll be sore an' cross an' in no condition for argyment; so my plan is jest this: to drive you over to the brick house in my top buggy; to have you set back in the corner, an' I git out an' go to the side door; an' when I git your aunt Mirandy 'n' aunt Jane out int' the shed to plan for a load o' wood I'm goin' to have hauled there this week, you'll slip out o' the buggy and go upstairs to bed.
At the hearin' of this, ye may swear, though, I was as mad as a grasshopper, but I remimbered that I was Sir Pathrick O'Grandison, Barronitt, and that it wasn't althegither gentaal to lit the anger git the upper hand o' the purliteness, so I made light o' the matter and kipt dark, and got quite sociable wid the little chap, and afther a while what did he do but ask me to go wid him to the widdy's, saying he wud give me the feshionable inthroduction to her leddyship.
When I come nights I can't git no rest 'cause yer allus poundin' a kid.
De fac' is, ole marster kin git along better when young marster's away den he kin when he's in de town; yes, en he love him better, too; so he gives him fifty dollahs a month--"
Haul up, Penn," he said, laughing, "er she 'll git stuck again.