give chase


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chase 1

 (chās)
v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
v.tr.
1. To follow rapidly in order to catch or overtake; pursue: chased the thief.
2. To follow (game) in order to capture or kill; hunt: chase foxes.
3. To seek the favor or company of persistently: chased me until I agreed to a date.
4. To put to flight; drive: chased the dog away.
5. Baseball
a. To cause (an opposing pitcher) to be removed from a game by batting well.
b. To swing at and miss (a pitch, especially one out of the strike zone).
v.intr.
1. To go or follow in pursuit.
2. Informal To go hurriedly; rush: chased all over looking for us.
n.
1. The act of chasing; pursuit.
2.
a. The hunting of game: the thrill of the chase.
b. Something that is hunted or pursued; quarry.
3. Chiefly British
a. A privately owned, unenclosed game preserve.
b. The right to hunt or keep game on the land of others.
Idioms:
chase (one's) tail
To exert oneself vigorously but ineffectually.
give chase
To engage in pursuit of quarry: Police gave chase to the speeding car.

[Middle English chasen, to hunt, from Old French chacier, from Vulgar Latin *captiāre, from Latin captāre, to catch; see catch.]

chase 2

 (chās)
n. Printing
A rectangular steel or iron frame into which pages or columns of type are locked for printing or plate making.

[Perhaps from French châsse, case, reliquary, from Old French chasse, from Latin capsa.]

click for a larger image
chase3
floral chase motif on a lipstick case

chase 3

 (chās)
n.
1.
a. A groove cut in an object; a slot: the chase for the quarrel on a crossbow.
b. A trench or channel for drainpipes or wiring.
2. The part of a gun in front of the trunnions.
3. The cavity of a mold.
tr.v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
1. To groove; indent.
2. To cut (the thread of a screw).
3. To decorate (metal) by engraving or embossing.

[Possibly from obsolete French chas, groove, enclosure, from Old French, from Latin capsa, box. V., variant of enchase.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.give chase - go after with the intent to catchgive chase - go after with the intent to catch; "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"; "the dog chased the rabbit"
tree - chase an animal up a tree; "the hunters treed the bear with dogs and killed it"; "her dog likes to tree squirrels"
pursue, follow - follow in or as if in pursuit; "The police car pursued the suspected attacker"; "Her bad deed followed her and haunted her dreams all her life"
quest - search the trail of (game); "The dog went off and quested"
hound, hunt, trace - pursue or chase relentlessly; "The hunters traced the deer into the woods"; "the detectives hounded the suspect until they found him"
run down - pursue until captured; "They ran down the fugitive"
Translations
يُطارِد، يُلاحِق
pronásledovat
üldözõbe vesz
elta, veita eftirför
kovalamakpeşine düşmek

chase

(tʃeis) verb
1. to run after; to pursue. He chased after them but did not catch them; We chased them by car.
2. (with away, ~off etc) to cause to run away. I often have to chase the boys away from my fruit trees.
noun
1. an act of chasing. We caught him after a 120 kph chase.
2. hunting (of animals). the pleasures of the chase.
give chase
to chase. The thieves ran off and the policeman gave chase.
References in classic literature ?
The dashing young frigate captain, the man who in middle age was nothing loth to give chase single-handed in his seventy-four to a whole fleet, the man of enterprise and consummate judgment, the old Admiral of the Fleet, the good and trusted servant of his country under two kings and a queen, had felt correctly Nelson's influence, and expressed himself with precision out of the fulness of his seaman's heart.
Granting other whales to be in sight, the fishermen will seldom give chase to one of these Grand Turks; for these Grand Turks are too lavish of their strength, and hence their unctuousness is small.
He then ran back to his car to give chase again, but as the abductors were a long way down Norton Road, Duke returned to the hysterical mum who had called police.
John Newman, 56, who runs the family-owned salon, said he tried to give chase but could not keep up.