give forth


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Related to give forth: given forth, gave forth
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.give forth - give out (breath or an odor); "The chimney exhales a thick smoke"
emit, pass off, breathe - expel (gases or odors)

give

verb
1. To make a gift of.Also used with away:
2. To present as a gift to a charity or cause:
3. To relinquish to the possession or control of another:
4. To distribute (money) as payment:
Informal: fork out (or over) (or up), shell out.
5. To provide as a remedy:
6. To mete out by means of some action:
7. To let have as a favor, prerogative, or privilege:
8. To put in the charge of another for care, use, or performance.Also used with over:
Idiom: give in trust.
9. To devote (oneself or one's efforts):
10. To set aside or distribute as a share:
11. To produce on the stage:
12. To organize and carry out (an activity):
13. To cause (a disease) to pass to another or others:
14. To bring forth (a product):
15. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
16. To be unable to hold up:
17. To fall in:
Idiom: give way.
phrasal verb
give away
To disclose in a breach of confidence:
Informal: spill.
Archaic: discover.
phrasal verb
give back
1. To put (someone) in the possession of a prior position or office:
2. To send, put, or carry back to a former location:
phrasal verb
give forth
To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
phrasal verb
give in
To cease opposition:
phrasal verb
give off
To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
phrasal verb
give out
1. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
2. To cease functioning properly:
Slang: conk out.
3. To suddenly lose all health or strength:
Informal: crack up.
Slang: conk out.
Idiom: give way.
4. To lose so much strength and power as to become ineffective or motionless:
Slang: poop out.
5. To make or become no longer active or productive:
6. To prove deficient or insufficient:
phrasal verb
give over
1. To yield (oneself) unrestrainedly, as to a particular impulse:
2. To cease consideration or treatment of:
phrasal verb
give up
1. To yield (oneself) unrestrainedly, as to a particular impulse:
2. To cease trying to accomplish or continue:
Informal: swear off.
Slang: lay off.
3. To desist from, cease, or discontinue (a habit, for example):
Slang: kick.
4. To cease consideration or treatment of:
5. To lose all hope:
noun
References in classic literature ?
They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves, do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience.
Upon the table (a huge iron plate supported upon six carronades) stood an inkstand of exquisite elegance, made of a beautifully chased Spanish piece, and a sonnette, which, when required, could give forth a report equal to that of a revolver.
The field was full of prickly things and thrumming things and pass-your-hand-over-the-yellow reeds and of those low-lying little green weeds with the purplish owers that, if you pulled out the threads and sucked hard on the heads with your tongue and teeth working in tandem, would give forth a few drops of nectar.
Wherever they go the Friends Andrea, Mia, Olivia, Stephanie and Emma give forth life-affirming advice on friendship and happiness.
But one day robots they will kneel And give forth oily tears of steel, They'll point and infra-red the door And man will programme them no more.
I knew I could go on living and give forth of myself in love if I could forgive the terrorists.