givenness


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givenness

(ˈɡɪvənˌnɪs)
n
the actuality of being given
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.givenness - the quality of being granted as a supposition; of being acknowledged or assumed
indisputability, indubitability, unquestionability, unquestionableness - the quality of being beyond question or dispute or doubt
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Peter Fitzpatrick (2001), this "new imperialism" assumes something like a "complete givenness," or the "naturalism" or "the implanted truth and the inevitability" of "the neoliberal order," while "it assures itself that it has encompassed its own limit, achieved completeness, and marked the end of history.
From then through the Civil War, America's leading theological writers mixed, with varying degrees of self-consciousness, assumptions about the normativeness of republicanism in the political realm, the givenness of commonsense realism in the personal realm, and the timeless truthfulness of evangelical Protestant Christianity in the religious realm.
MacKinnon describes consciousness raising as a "feminist method and practice" that involves "a face-to face social experience that strikes at the fabric of meaning of social relations between and among women and men by calling their givenness into question and reconstituting their meaning in a transformed and critical way" (171).
Across the pluralism of traditions, schools, and types of mediation, one finds a broad consensus on the reality of a postmodern intellectual culture that includes such themes as the cultural linguistic character of all knowing, the historicity of reason, the givenness of pluralism, the perspectival and incomplete character of every tradition, the modesty with which all comprehensive truth claims may be proffered, and the demand that all such claims be cognizant of the other.
Similar to the so-called "critical realists," (59) Christian theology maintains a certain undeniable givenness to the universe.
Finally, literary critics, like some cultural critics, also tend to take the givenness of the postmodern condition for granted (or, at least, to refuse to question it) and to concentrate on identifying its specific literary forms: that is, they attempt to describe a typology of textual features (and attitudes towards representation) that can be called postmodern.
Forgiveness is a symbol, a sacrament of one's conviction of the givenness of life.
Joyce's avoidance of the question of ideology may be poststructuralism a la Foucault, who also, in Discipline and Punish and elsewhere, avoided worrying about ideology by taking the givenness of discourse as his focus (if you don't look beneath surfaces, you won't find anything).
I finally realized what I had hidden from, in those early years, was exactly the knowledge that had disappeared behind the givenness of all things to us now.
The Eternalist [the Mimamsaka], has also made an important point regarding the givenness of the language and the word-object connection.
A child does not enter into a committed relationship with his or her parents in the same way that a parent, by virtue of the decision to bear offspring, does with the child; still, there is some measure of givenness in the child-parent relationship as well.
Then, as the force of this encounter intensifies, the forms dissolve, and the figures in the second stanza become those of energy itself, achieving a 'new density' in the dark givenness of the self, and flowing out from this centre into an as yet undefined 'somewhere else'.