gladiolus


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glad·i·o·lus

 (glăd′ē-ō′ləs)
n. pl. glad·i·o·li (-lī, -lē) or glad·i·o·lus·es
1. also glad·i·o·la (-lə) Botany Any of numerous plants of the genus Gladiolus, native chiefly to tropical and southern Africa and having sword-shaped leaves and showy, variously colored, irregular flowers arranged in one-sided spikes. Also called sword lily.
2. Anatomy The large middle section of the sternum.

[Middle English gladiol, from Latin gladiolus, wild iris, diminutive of gladius, sword; see gladiator.]

gladiolus

(ˌɡlædɪˈəʊləs)
n, pl -lus, -li (-laɪ) or -luses
1. (Plants) Also called: sword lily or gladiola any iridaceous plant of the widely cultivated genus Gladiolus, having sword-shaped leaves and spikes of funnel-shaped brightly coloured flowers
2. (Anatomy) anatomy the large central part of the breastbone
[C16: from Latin: a small sword, sword lily, from gladius a sword]

glad•i•o•lus

(ˌglæd iˈoʊ ləs)

n., pl. -lus, -li (-lī), -lus•es for 1; -li for 2.
1. any plant of the genus Gladiolus, of the iris family, native esp. to Africa, having erect, sword-shaped leaves and spikes of flowers in a variety of colors.
2. the middle segment of the sternum.
[1560–70; < Latin: small sword, sword lily =gladi(us) sword + -olus -ole1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gladiolus - any of numerous plants of the genus Gladiolus native chiefly to tropical and South Africa having sword-shaped leaves and one-sided spikes of brightly colored funnel-shaped flowersgladiolus - any of numerous plants of the genus Gladiolus native chiefly to tropical and South Africa having sword-shaped leaves and one-sided spikes of brightly colored funnel-shaped flowers; widely cultivated
iridaceous plant - any bulbous plant of the family Iridaceae
genus Gladiolus - gladiolas
2.gladiolus - the large central part of the breastbone
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
breastbone, sternum - the flat bone that articulates with the clavicles and the first seven pairs of ribs
Translations
estoquemesosternón

gladiolus

[glædɪˈəʊləs] N (gladiolus or gladioluses or gladioli (pl)) [ˌglædɪˈəʊlaɪ]gladiolo m

gladiolus

n pl <gladioli> → Gladiole f

gladiolus

[ˌglædɪˈəʊləs] ngladiolo
References in classic literature ?
Here I found some young onions, a couple of gladiolus bulbs, and a quantity of immature carrots, all of which I secured, and, scrambling over a ruined wall, went on my way through scarlet and crimson trees towards Kew-- it was like walking through an avenue of gigantic blood drops--possessed with two ideas: to get more food, and to limp, as soon and as far as my strength permitted, out of this accursed unearthly region of the pit.
Tip of the Week: Eleanor McCormick of Canoga Park wrote to ask about care for gladiolus bulbs (actually, they are corms) after blooming is over.
About 15 minutes after the couple left the house in the 28400 block of Gladiolus Drive, a neighbor noticed black smoke pouring from a rear window, officials said.
Corms are generally thought of as unspectacular underground storage organs found in a limited number of garden ornamentals, including gladiolus.
Also set for maintenance work are Goodvale Road, Canvas Street, Sarita Avenue, Abelia Road, Snapdragon Place, Flowerpark Drive, Nasturtium Drive, Lotus Garden Drive, Gladiolus Drive, Oakmoor Street, Bainbury Street, Poppy Meadow Street, Gilbert Drive, 12th Street and Placeritos Boulevard.
Asiatic lilies were $6 ($3 to $4 retail per stem), and gladiolus were $10 instead of $2 to $4 each elsewhere.
This plant was given its common name in honor of the baboons which, on the African continent, dig up and feast on Babiana corms - bulblike structures also found on gladiolus.
Some other ways to make white are with rice (whole or ground), white beans, cotton, as well as white mums, carnations, gladiolus and roses.
Casey, who sports brown and white patches and a distinctive reddish tail, fled a converted rabbit cage in the rear yard of Redford's new Gladiolus Drive home.
With the planting season past for tulips and other spring bulbs, now is the perfect time to buy summer annuals like zinnias and marigolds, perennial all-stars such as pansies and petunias and accent plants like gladiolus for the garden.
If gladiolus could loosen up, they'd be watsonias If you like gladiolus but wish they didn't look so stiff, you might try growing watsonias.
To find out more about gladioli, visit the website of the British Gladiolus Society at www.