glamour


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glam·our

also glam·or  (glăm′ər)
n.
1. Exciting or mysterious attractiveness usually associated with striking physical beauty, luxury, or celebrity.
2. Archaic Magic cast by a spell; enchantment.

[Scots, magic spell, alteration of grammar (from the association of learning with magic).]
Usage Note: Many words, such as honor, vapor, and labor, are usually spelled with an -or ending in American English but with an -our ending in British English. The preferred spelling of glamour, however, is -our, making it an exception to the usual American practice. The adjective is more often spelled glamorous in both American and British usage.

glamour

(ˈɡlæmə) or

glamor

n
1. charm and allure; fascination
2.
a. fascinating or voluptuous beauty, often dependent on artifice
b. (as modifier): a glamour girl.
3. archaic a magic spell; charm
[C18: Scottish variant of grammar (hence a magic spell, because occult practices were popularly associated with learning)]

glam•our

or glam•or

(ˈglæm ər)

n.
1. the quality of fascinating, alluring, or attracting, esp. by a combination of charm and good looks.
2. excitement, adventure, and unusual activity: the glamour of being an explorer.
3. magic or enchantment; spell; witchery.
adj.
4. suggestive or full of glamour: a glamour job in television.
[1710–20; earlier glammar, dissimilated variant of grammar in sense “occult learning”]

glamour

- First meant "magic, enchantment" or "art of contriving magic spells."
See also related terms for magic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glamour - alluring beauty or charm (often with sex-appeal)glamour - alluring beauty or charm (often with sex-appeal)
beauty - the qualities that give pleasure to the senses
Verb1.glamour - cast a spell over someone or somethingglamour - cast a spell over someone or something; put a hex on someone or something
voodoo - bewitch by or as if by a voodoo
spell - place under a spell
becharm, charm - control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft

glamour

noun
1. charm, appeal, beauty, attraction, fascination, allure, magnetism, enchantment, bewitchment Her air of mystery only added to her glamour.
2. excitement, magic, thrill, romance, prestige, glitz (slang) the glamour of show biz

glamour

also glamor
noun
Translations
بَريق، رَوْنَقسِحْر
kouzlopřitažlivostpůvabšarm
glamourglanstrylleskær
varázsavarázslatos szépség
dÿrîarljómi
burvībašarmsvaldzinājums
büyüleyicilikcazibeçekicilikgüzellik

glamour

glamor (US) [ˈglæməʳ]
A. N [of person, job, place] → glamour m
B. CPD glamour boy Nniño m bonito
glamour girl Nbelleza f
glamour sport Ndeporte m rodeado de glamour

glamour

[ˈglæmər] glamor (US) néclat m, prestige m

glamour

, (US) glamor
nGlamour m; (of occasion, situation)Glanz m; she/the job doesn’t have much glamoursie/dieser Beruf hat keinen besonderen Reiz; she has glamour as well as prettinesssie ist nicht nur hübsch, sondern besitzt auch noch einen besonderen Reiz

glamour

, (US) glamor:
glamour boy
n (inf)Schönling m (inf)
glamour girl
n (inf)Glamourgirl nt
glamour model
nPin-up-Girl nt
glamourpuss
n (esp Brit inf: = female) → Glamourkätzchen nt (inf); (= male)Schönling m (inf)

glamour

glamor (Am) [ˈglæməʳ] nfascino

glamour

(ˈglӕmə) (American) glamor noun
1. the often false or superficial beauty or charm which attracts. the glamour of a career in films.
2. great beauty or charm, achieved with the aid of make-up, beautiful clothes etc. the glamour of film stars.
ˈglamorize, ˈglamorise verb
to make glamorous. This film attempts to glamorize war.
ˈglamorous adjective
having glamour.
ˈglamorously adverb

glamour, noun, ends in -our.
glamorous, adjective is spelt with -or-.
References in classic literature ?
She felt somewhat like a woman who in a moment of passion is betrayed into an act of infidelity, and realizes the significance of the act without being wholly awakened from its glamour.
In the glamour of the moonlight they had vanished; a veil of silver-gray vapor touched here and there with ebony shadows masked its site.
The glamour of inexperience is over your eyes," he answered; "and you see it through a charmed medium: you cannot discern that the gilding is slime and the silk draperies cobwebs; that the marble is sordid slate, and the polished woods mere refuse chips and scaly bark.
With one accord the headmen answered: "Indeed you did well, Slaughterer," for the glamour of Nada was upon them and they would cherish her as others had cherished her.
I purposely waived the glamour which my old garden had for my mind, and which I wouldn't have exchanged for fifty parks.
Had I been able to tell him of the experiences of Tarzan of the Apes I could doubtless have taken much of the glamour and romance from jungle life that naturally surrounds it in the minds of those who have had no experience of it.
The springs of laughter flow not from his heart, Where bide the dust and glamour of old days.
When one talks of the Thames docks, "beauty" is a vain word, but romance has lived too long upon this river not to have thrown a mantle of glamour upon its banks.
The women who might pass his way could deny their lust for concrete possessions, but their actions, however concealed their motives, would give the lie to any ineffectual glamour of romance they might attempt to fling over their carefully measured adventures of the heart.
Any glamour which may have attached to cadet life in Poe's eyes was speedily lost, for discipline at West Point was never so severe nor were the accommodations ever so poor.
Yet when I think of him in cold blood, far away from the glamour of his presence, I am convinced from his cynical speech and the look which I have caught in his eyes that he is one who should be deeply distrusted.
How I wish I could reproduce the glamour of his discourses, the peculiar mixture of accurate knowledge and of racy imagination which gave them their fascination, until even the Professor's cynical and sceptical smile would gradually vanish from his thin face as he listened.