glandular

(redirected from glandular extract)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

glan·du·lar

 (glăn′jə-lər)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, affecting, or resembling a gland or its secretion.
b. Functioning as a gland.
2. Having glands.
3. Resulting from the abnormal function of glands or a gland.
4.
a. Innate; visceral: has a glandular aversion to materialistic values.
b. Carnal; sensual.

[French glandulaire, from glandule, small gland, from Latin glandula; see gland1.]

glan′du·lar·ly adv.

glandular

(ˈɡlændjʊlə) or

glandulous

adj
(Anatomy) of, relating to, containing, functioning as, or affecting a gland: glandular tissue.
[C18: from Latin glandula, literally: a little acorn; see glanders]
ˈglandularly, ˈglandulously adv

glan•du•lar

(ˈglæn dʒə lər)

adj.
1. consisting of, containing, or bearing glands.
2. of, pertaining to, or resembling a gland: a glandular disorder.
3. visceral; instinctive.
[1730–40; glandule gland (now obsolete) (< Latin glandula; see gland1, -ule) + -ar1]
glan′du•lar•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.glandular - relating to or affecting or functioning as a gland; "glandular malfunctions"
Translations
غُدّي، مُتَعلِّق بالغُدد
žlázový
kirtel-
mirigy-
kirtla-
liaukinis
žľazový
salgıbezlerine ait

glandular

[ˈglændjʊləʳ]
A. ADJglandular
B. CPD glandular fever Nmononucleosis f infecciosa

glandular

adj glandular feverDrüsenfieber nt

glandular

[ˈglændjʊləʳ] adjghiandolare

gland

(glӕnd) noun
a part of the body that takes substances from the blood and stores them for use or in order that the body may get rid of them. a sweat gland; He has swollen glands in his neck.
ˈglandular (-djulə) , ((American) -dʒulər) adjective
of the glands. glandular fever.

glan·du·lar

a. 1. glandular, rel. a una glándula 2. rel. a un ganglio.
References in periodicals archive ?
19) Other studies have concurred the beneficial attributes of thymus glandular extract, which included accelerated bone marrow recovery and normalization of the peripheral blood count.
The ingredients in these products may include vitamins, minerals, herbs or other botanicals, amino acids, protein, and substances such as enzymes, organ tissues, glandular extracts, and metabolites.
Evidence suggests that with oral consumption of glandular extracts, a small percentage (5-10%) of their peptides are not broken down into their constituent amino acids but are available for intact absorption in the small intestine.