glassy

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glass·y

 (glăs′ē)
adj. glass·i·er, glass·i·est
1. Characteristic of or resembling glass.
2. Lifeless; expressionless: "the face changing to a demon's face with a fixed glassy grin" (Katherine Anne Porter).

glass′i·ly adv.
glass′i·ness n.

glassy

(ˈɡlɑːsɪ)
adj, glassier or glassiest
1. resembling glass, esp in smoothness, slipperiness, or transparency
2. void of expression, life, or warmth: a glassy stare.
ˈglassily adv
ˈglassiness n

glass•y

(ˈglæs i, ˈglɑ si)

adj. glass•i•er, glass•i•est.
1. resembling glass, as in transparency or smoothness.
2. expressionless; dull: glassy eyes; a glassy stare.
3. of the nature of glass; vitreous.
[1350–1400]
glass′i•ly, adv.
glass′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.glassy - resembling glass in smoothness and shininess and slickness; "the glassy surface of the lake"; "the pavement was...glassy with water"- Willa Cather
smooth - having a surface free from roughness or bumps or ridges or irregularities; "smooth skin"; "a smooth tabletop"; "smooth fabric"; "a smooth road"; "water as smooth as a mirror"
2.glassy - (used of eyes) lacking liveliness; "empty eyes"; "a glassy stare"; "his eyes were glazed over with boredom"
empty - holding or containing nothing; "an empty glass"; "an empty room"; "full of empty seats"; "empty hours"
3.glassy - (of ceramics) having the surface made shiny and nonporous by fusing a vitreous solution to itglassy - (of ceramics) having the surface made shiny and nonporous by fusing a vitreous solution to it; "glazed pottery"; "glassy porcelain"; "hard vitreous china used for plumbing fixtures"
ceramics - the art of making and decorating pottery
shiny, glazed - having a shiny surface or coating; "glazed fabrics"; "glazed doughnuts"

glassy

adjective
1. smooth, clear, slick, shiny, glossy, transparent, slippery glassy green pebbles
2. expressionless, cold, fixed, empty, dull, blank, glazed, vacant, dazed, lifeless There was a remote, glassy look in his eyes.

glassy

adjective
Having a high, radiant sheen:
Translations
جامِدَهزُجاجي، كالزُّجاج
apatickýjako zrcadloskelný
glasagtigudtryksløs
üvegszerû
spegilsléttursviplaus, dauflegur
ako zrkadlo
boşcam gibiifadesiz

glassy

[ˈglɑːsɪ] ADJ (glassier (compar) (glassiest (superl))) [substance] → vítreo; [surface] → liso; [water] → espejado; [eye, look] → vidrioso

glassy

[ˈglɑːsi] adj
[eyes, stare] (because of drugs, alcohol)vitreux/euse
(= smooth) → lisse

glassy

adj (+er) surface, sea etcspiegelglatt; eye, lookglasig; glassy-eyed (look)glasig; to be glassy-eyedeinen glasigen Blick haben; to stare at somebody glassy-eyedjdn mit glasigem Blick anstarren

glassy

[ˈglɑːsɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (sea, lake) → come uno specchio; (eye, look) → vitreo/a

glass

(glaːs) noun
1. a hard usually breakable transparent substance. The bottle is made of glass; (also adjective) a glass bottle.
2. a usually tall hollow object made of glass, used for drinking. There are six glasses on the tray; sherry-glasses.
3. (also ˈlooking-glass) a mirror.
4. a barometer, or the atmospheric pressure shown by one. The glass is falling.
ˈglasses noun plural
spectacles.
ˈglassful noun
the amount that a drinking-glass will hold. Pour in two glassfuls of water.
ˈglassy adjective
1. not showing any expression. a glassy stare.
2. like glass. a glassy sea.
ˈglassiness noun

glasses , meaning spectacles, is plural: His reading glasses are broken .
but a pair of glasses takes a singular verb: A pair of glasses has been found .
References in classic literature ?
Witness this new-made World, another Heav'n From Heaven Gate not farr, founded in view On the cleer HYALINE, the Glassie Sea; Of amplitude almost immense, with Starr's Numerous, and every Starr perhaps a World Of destind habitation; but thou know'st Thir seasons: among these the seat of men, Earth with her nether Ocean circumfus'd, Thir pleasant dwelling place.
Many people understand the concept of traditional as standing in contrasr to innovative or modern, but in fact, as folklorist Henry Glassie has so eloquently explained, tradition is simply "the creation of the future out of the past.
specially in the celidh which folklorist Henry Glassie, in 1979,
E incluso cuando su interes se detiene mas alla de su pais, estos especialistas parecen interesarse principalmente en estudios parciales -como ocurre, por ejemplo, con el trabajo de Glassie (1999), por otra parte estupendo, con capitulos sobre alfombras y ceramicas- o en productos occidentales en contextos no occidentales (Miller 1998).
Yet this irritated the newly independent-minded students of folklife or "folk culture" who viewed the scope of the field more broadly to include ethnological concerns of social and material culture (Foster 1953; Glassie 1968; Yoder 1963).
When I fish with Guide Tony Roach, who often pitches and rips a #7 Glow Yellow Perch Jigging Rapala, I might fish a Northland Puppet Minnow, a River2Sea Glassie Vibe, or a Sebile Spin Shad.
Jefferson Glassie is a nonprofit organization lawyer in Washington, DC, and the author of Heaven is Everywhere, and other various legal and inquiring books.
Henry Glassie has explored cultural conservation issues in areas as diverse as Ireland, Afghanistan and Turkey (Glassie, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1982, 1999, 2000).
Henry Glassie, College Professor Emeritus at Indiana University, has written 14 books, including Folk Housing in Middle Virginia, Turkish Traditional Art Today, Irish Folktales, The Stars of Ballymenone, The Potter's Art and, most recently, Prince Twins Seven-Seven: His Art, His Life in Nigeria, His Exile in America.
Young writes both wryly and sympathetically about some of the more obscure folk groups of the 1960s and 1970s--with names like Alphane Moon, Our Glassie Azoth and Trembling Bells--and their naive but touching idealism.
Por otro lado, Henry Glassie, aunque coincide en algunas cosas con los autores ya mencionados, relaciona su definicion de la expresion con la arquitectura que ha sido de alguna forma desdenada por la academia.
My interest in interior decoration began with my adviser Henry Glassie at Indiana University, who has done considerable work on vernacular architecture.