glazed


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glaze

 (glāz)
n.
1. A thin smooth shiny coating.
2. A thin glassy coating of ice.
3.
a. A coating of colored, opaque, or transparent material applied to ceramics before firing.
b. A coating, as of syrup, applied to food.
c. A transparent coating applied to the surface of a painting to modify the color tones.
4. A glassy film, as one over the eyes.
v. glazed, glaz·ing, glaz·es
v.tr.
1. To fit, furnish, or secure with glass: glaze a window.
2. To apply a glaze to: glaze a doughnut; glaze pottery.
3. To coat or cover thinly with ice.
4. To give a smooth lustrous surface to.
v.intr.
1. To be or become glazed or glassy: His eyes glazed over from boredom.
2. To form a glaze.

[From Middle English glasen, from glas, glass, from Old English glæs; see ghel- in Indo-European roots.]

glaz′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.glazed - (used of eyes) lacking liveliness; "empty eyes"; "a glassy stare"; "his eyes were glazed over with boredom"
empty - holding or containing nothing; "an empty glass"; "an empty room"; "full of empty seats"; "empty hours"
2.glazed - fitted or covered with glass; "four glazed walls"
glassless, unglazed - not furnished with glass; "windows were unglazed to admit as much light and air as possible"
3.glazed - having a shiny surface or coating; "glazed fabrics"; "glazed doughnuts"
unglazed - not having a shiny coating; "unglazed paper"
4.glazed - (of foods) covered with a shiny coating by applying e.g. beaten egg or a sugar or gelatin mixture; "glazed doughnuts"; "a glazed ham"
coated - having a coating; covered with an outer layer or film; often used in combination; "coated paper has a smooth polished coating especially suitable for halftone printing"; "sugar-coated pills"

glazed

adjective expressionless, cold, fixed, empty, dull, blank, vacant, dazed, lifeless, glassy She sat in front of the television with glazed eyes.
Translations
lasittunut

glazed

[gleɪzd] ADJ
1. [surface] → vidriado; [paper] → satinado; [eye] → vidrioso
2. (Brit) [door, window etc] → con vidrio or cristal
3. (Culin) → glaseado
4. (US) (= tipsy) → achispado

glazed

[ˈgleɪzd] adj
[eyes, look] → vitreux/euse
[pottery] → vernissé(e)
[tiles] → vernissé(e)

glazed

[gleɪzd] adj (tiles, pottery) → invetriato/a (fig) (eye) → vitreo/a
References in classic literature ?
Hester Prynne, meanwhile, kept her place upon the pedestal of shame, with glazed eyes, and an air of weary indifference.
His schoolhouse was a low building of one large room, rudely constructed of logs; the windows partly glazed, and partly patched with leaves of old copybooks.
Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow, where firm fields of ice, the accumulation of centuries of winters, glazed in Alpine heights above heights, surround the pole, and concentre the multiplied rigours of extreme cold.
To sit, staring at those fixed glazed eyes, in silence for a moment, would play, Scrooge felt, the very deuce with him.
On the walls there were some common coloured pictures, framed and glazed, of scripture subjects; such as I have never seen since in the hands of pedlars, without seeing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view.
We parted in tears and kisses, and I lived for some weeks with that sense of having been a Nero, till two months after I received a much glazed and silvered card to the usual effect.
As they looked on him in astonishment, the eyes opened but they were fixed and glazed.
He saw him search the ground with his keen eyes, and he only sat there watching with eyes that glazed from the intensity of his gaze.
There lay the cabinet before their eyes in the quiet lamplight, a good fire glowing and chattering on the hearth, the kettle singing its thin strain, a drawer or two open, papers neatly set forth on the business table, and nearer the fire, the things laid out for tea; the quietest room, you would have said, and, but for the glazed presses full of chemicals, the most commonplace that night in London.
The steersman is placed in a glazed box, that is raised about the hull of the Nautilus, and furnished with lenses.
The roof was in shadow, and the windows, partially glazed with coloured glass and partially unglazed, admitted a tempered light.
A globe of fire appeared above the glazed opening of the ceiling, casting a strong light into my chamber; and I perceived with terror that a man was standing within a few paces of me.