gloom

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gloom

 (glo͞om)
n.
1.
a. Partial or total darkness; dimness: switched on a table lamp to banish the gloom of a winter afternoon.
b. A partially or totally dark place, area, or location.
2.
a. An atmosphere of melancholy or depression: Gloom pervaded the office.
b. A state of melancholy or depression; despondency.
v. gloomed, gloom·ing, glooms
v.intr.
1. To be or become dark, shaded, or obscure.
2. To feel, appear, or act despondent, sad, or mournful.
v.tr.
1. To make dark, shaded, or obscure.
2. Archaic To make despondent; sadden.

[Probably from Middle English gloumen, to become dark, look glum.]

gloom

(ɡluːm)
n
1. partial or total darkness
2. a state of depression or melancholy
3. an appearance or expression of despondency or melancholy
4. poetic a dim or dark place
vb
5. (intr) to look sullen or depressed
6. to make or become dark or gloomy
[C14 gloumben to look sullen; related to Norwegian dialect glome to eye suspiciously]
ˈgloomful adj
ˈgloomfully adv
ˈgloomless adj

gloom

(glum)
n.
1. total or partial darkness.
2. a state of melancholy or depression.
3. a despondent or depressed look or expression.
v.i.
4. to appear or become dark, dim, or somber.
5. to look sad or dejected; frown.
v.t.
6. to make gloomy.
7. to make dark or somber.
[1300–50; (v.) Middle English gloumben,glomen to frown, perhaps representing Old English *glūmian (akin to early German gläumen to make turbid); see glum]

Gloom

 

See Also: BEHAVIOR; DEJECTION; FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, SERIOUS; SADNESS

  1. Bleak and uninviting as an empty hotel room —Jonathan Valin
  2. Bleak as a winter hillside —F. van Wyck Mason
  3. Brain which had become as inhospitable to the brighter side of life as a house without windows is to cheerful lodgers —Bertold Brecht
  4. Brooded over … misfortune, like Hamlet or a character in Ibsen —Mary McCarthy
  5. Brooding … like a martyr —Paul Reidinger
  6. Brooding like a woman unsatisfied —Joanne Selzer The comparison as used by the author in a poem entitled Summer Heat refers to the atmosphere after a heavy storm. The simile in its full context begins as follows: “The air hung heavy after the storm, brooding …”
  7. Brood like a ghost —Fannie Stearns Gifford
  8. Cheerful as a turkey before Thanksgiving —Anon Variants for changing seasons include: “Cheerful as a rabbit before Easter” and “Cheerful as a goose before Christmas.”
  9. Cold and gray … like the mortuary —Mike Fredman
  10. Dour as a wet cat —Warren Beck
  11. Felt heavy as Sunday —John Braine
  12. Gloom … dark and stagnant like a bed of straw for sick livestock —Kenzaburo Oë
  13. Gloom, like a poisonous mist, fills the car —Ira Wood
  14. Gloomy and melancholy, like ghosts —Mark Twain
  15. Gloomy as a beach resort on a wet Sunday in July —Anon This may be inspired by a much-used, also unattributed simile, “Gloomy as a graveyard on a wet Sunday afternoon.”
  16. [A house] gloomy as a crypt —Michael Korda
  17. Gloomy as a tick on Sunday —Grace Paley
  18. Gloomy as a wet holiday —Anon
  19. Gloomy as night —Homer
  20. Glum as a gumboil, as sad as despair —Don Marquis
  21. Glum as a student who’s fallen hopelessly behind —John Gardner
  22. Glum as a tongue-tied parrot —Joseph C. Lincoln
  23. Grew clouded and closed, like the dense pallid sky —Sylvia Berkman

    See Also: RESERVE

  24. Ill-humor is like laziness, for it is a kind of laziness —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  25. It was the kind of day that made suicide look like a reasonable proposition —Mike Fredman

    See Also: DAY

  26. Looked like he swallowed a lemon —William Diehl
  27. Melancholy as a defeated politician —Herbert V. Prochnow
  28. Melancholy as a gib [castrated] cat —William Shakespeare
  29. Melancholy sound … like the weeping of a solitary, deserted human heart —Guy de Maupassant

    See Also: NOISE

  30. Moping around like a chicken with the dropsy —Babs H. Deal
  31. (The men grew silent and) morose like lumps of soft coal —Richard Ford
  32. A sense of melancholy had enveloped her like a sheath —Charles Johnson
  33. (My grandmother had) a permanently bleak outlook … like one of those cartoon characters with a small cloud over their heads —Susan Walton, New York Times/Hers, June 25, 1987
  34. Somber and unreadable as Latin —Tony Ardizzone
  35. Sour as port decanted too long —Truman Capote
  36. Sulked like a bear —Anon
  37. We [three motorists] drove out the lane like a funeral cortege —Ross Macdonald

gloom


Past participle: gloomed
Gerund: glooming

Imperative
gloom
gloom
Present
I gloom
you gloom
he/she/it glooms
we gloom
you gloom
they gloom
Preterite
I gloomed
you gloomed
he/she/it gloomed
we gloomed
you gloomed
they gloomed
Present Continuous
I am glooming
you are glooming
he/she/it is glooming
we are glooming
you are glooming
they are glooming
Present Perfect
I have gloomed
you have gloomed
he/she/it has gloomed
we have gloomed
you have gloomed
they have gloomed
Past Continuous
I was glooming
you were glooming
he/she/it was glooming
we were glooming
you were glooming
they were glooming
Past Perfect
I had gloomed
you had gloomed
he/she/it had gloomed
we had gloomed
you had gloomed
they had gloomed
Future
I will gloom
you will gloom
he/she/it will gloom
we will gloom
you will gloom
they will gloom
Future Perfect
I will have gloomed
you will have gloomed
he/she/it will have gloomed
we will have gloomed
you will have gloomed
they will have gloomed
Future Continuous
I will be glooming
you will be glooming
he/she/it will be glooming
we will be glooming
you will be glooming
they will be glooming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been glooming
you have been glooming
he/she/it has been glooming
we have been glooming
you have been glooming
they have been glooming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been glooming
you will have been glooming
he/she/it will have been glooming
we will have been glooming
you will have been glooming
they will have been glooming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been glooming
you had been glooming
he/she/it had been glooming
we had been glooming
you had been glooming
they had been glooming
Conditional
I would gloom
you would gloom
he/she/it would gloom
we would gloom
you would gloom
they would gloom
Past Conditional
I would have gloomed
you would have gloomed
he/she/it would have gloomed
we would have gloomed
you would have gloomed
they would have gloomed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gloom - a state of partial or total darkness; "he struck a match to dispel the gloom"
semidarkness - partial darkness
2.gloom - a feeling of melancholy apprehension
apprehension, apprehensiveness, dread - fearful expectation or anticipation; "the student looked around the examination room with apprehension"
melancholy - a feeling of thoughtful sadness
3.gloom - an atmosphere of depression and melancholy; "gloom pervaded the office"
ambiance, ambience, atmosphere - a particular environment or surrounding influence; "there was an atmosphere of excitement"
cloud - a cause of worry or gloom or trouble; "the only cloud on the horizon was the possibility of dissent by the French"
bareness, bleakness, desolation, nakedness - a bleak and desolate atmosphere; "the nakedness of the landscape"

gloom

gloom

nounverb
Translations
ظَلام دامِس، حُلْكَهغَم، كَرَب، كآبَه
šerosmutek
forstemthedmørke
drungi, depurîmyrkur, dimma
liūdesysslogus
drūmumsnomāktībatumsa
alaca karanlıkkederüzüntüyarı karanlık

gloom

[gluːm] N
1. (= darkness) → penumbra f, oscuridad f
2. (= sadness, despondency) → melancolía f, tristeza f
it's not all gloom and doom hereaquí no todo son pronósticos de desastre
she's always full of gloom and doomsiempre lo ve todo negro

gloom

[ˈgluːm] n
(= darkness) → obscurité f
(= pessimism) → tristesse f, mélancolie f
economic gloom → morosité économique
gloom and doom → morosité et sinistrose

gloom

n
(= darkness)Düsterkeit f
(= sadness)düstere or gedrückte Stimmung; economic gloomdepressive Wirtschaftslage; an air or atmosphere of gloomeine düstere or gedrückte Atmosphäre; to cast a gloom over somethingeinen Schatten auf etw (acc)werfen; a gloom descended on useine düstere Stimmung überkam uns; he was filled with gloomer war sehr bedrückt or niedergeschlagen

gloom

[gluːm] n
a. (darkness) → oscurità, buio
in the gloom → nell'oscurità, al buio
b. (sadness) → tristezza, malinconia

gloom

(gluːm) noun
1. a state of not quite complete darkness. I could not tell the colour of the car in the gloom.
2. sadness. The king's death cast a gloom over the whole country.
ˈgloomy adjective
1. sad or depressed. Don't look so gloomy.
2. depressing. gloomy news.
3. dim; dark. gloomy rooms.
ˈgloominess noun
References in classic literature ?
Started from his slumbers, Ahab, face to face, saw the Parsee; and hooped round by the gloom of the night they seemed the last men in a flooded world.
And Hades seized her and took her loudly crying in his chariot down to his realm of mist and gloom.
A sombre, yet beautiful and peaceful gloom here pervaded all things.
At the same time the feeling he had noticed between his protegee Natasha and Prince Andrew accentuated his gloom by the contrast between his own position and his friend's.
It was tinged, rather more darkly than usual, with the gentle gloom of Mr.
She had wandered, without rule or guidance, in a moral wilderness, as vast, as intricate, and shadowy as the untamed forest, amid the gloom of which they were now holding a colloquy that was to decide their fate.
Towards night the ship again stood out to gain sea-room, and a gloom was visible in every countenance.