glycerol


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Related to glycerol: propylene glycol

glyc·er·ol

 (glĭs′ə-rôl′, -rōl′)
n.
A syrupy, sweet, colorless or yellowish liquid triol, C3H8O3, obtained from fats and oils as a byproduct of saponification and used as a solvent, antifreeze, plasticizer, and sweetener and in the manufacture of dynamite, cosmetics, liquid soaps, inks, and lubricants.

glycerol

(ˈɡlɪsəˌrɒl)
n
(Chemistry) a colourless or pale yellow odourless sweet-tasting syrupy liquid; 1,2,3-propanetriol: a by-product of soap manufacture, used as a solvent, antifreeze, plasticizer, and sweetener (E422). Formula: C3H8O3. Also called (not in technical usage): glycerine or glycerin
[C19: from glycer(ine) + -ol1]

glyc•er•ol

(ˈglɪs əˌrɔl, -ˌrɒl)

n.
a colorless liquid, C3H8O3, used as a sweetener and preservative, and in suppositories and skin emollients.
[1880–85; glycer (in) + -ol1]

glyc·er·ol

(glĭs′ə-rôl′)
A sweet, syrupy liquid obtained from animal fats and oils or by the fermentation of glucose. It is used as a solvent, sweetener, and antifreeze and in making explosives and soaps. Also called glycerin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycerol - a sweet syrupy trihydroxy alcohol obtained by saponification of fats and oilsglycerol - a sweet syrupy trihydroxy alcohol obtained by saponification of fats and oils
alcohol - any of a series of volatile hydroxyl compounds that are made from hydrocarbons by distillation
Translations

glycerol

[ˈglɪsərɒl] Nglicerol m

glycerol

nGlyzerin nt

glycerol, glycerin

n glicerol m, glicerina
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: The production of waste glycerol is increasing annually and there is a desire to efficiently upgrade it to more valuable chemicals.
With the extensive search for alternative renewable energy sources and development of the biodiesel industry, glycerol has been produced in large amounts reaching considerable surplus.
After 1 week of adaptation to the housing conditions, the mice were randomly divided into four groups ( n = 6 per group): control group, glycerol-treated group, glycerol + CLI-095 group, and glycerol + PDTC group.
This syndrome is characterized by developmental delay,congenital adrenal hypoplasia, DuchenneMuscularDystrophy (DMD) and glycerol kinase deficiency.
Glycerol has been used as an additional energy source for cattle to enhance growth performance and nutrient digestibility [10].
If you put it directly into the bloodstream you would have extensive hemolysis, the rupturing of blood cells because of the high osmolality caused by the glycerol solution.
This biodiesel production process leads to the creation of around 10% (w/w) glycerol as the primary by-product, although a number of impurities are present, such as soap, fatty acids, methanol, salts, water and other non-glycerol substances, depending on the catalysts and feedstock used in the procedure (8,9).
A waste product from this process is crude glycerol, which is formed on a large scale and contains many impurities that make it costly to purify and re-use in other areas.
The effects of pretreatments with boron or glycerol coupled with thermal modification on resistance to mold growth and fungal degradation were examined for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.
2014) that are also permeated by small, uncharged solutes such as glycerol, urea, ammonia, and even metalloids such as arsenite.
Generally, water and/ or glycerol are used as plasticizer in varying amounts, and the extrusion temperature varies between 40 and 180[degrees]C [3-7, 9-12], The majority of reports describe extrusion of proteins at relatively low temperatures up to 130[degrees]C or with a high amount of water as plasticizer.