gnatho


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gnatho

n. gnato, el punto más bajo de la línea media de la mandíbula.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These references come without explanation, and whilst Gnatho could arguably be English idiom by 1540 (thanks to Thomas Elyot's Pasquil the Playne, printed in 1533), according to the Oxford English Dictionary the term 'Thraso', the braggart from Eunuchus, does not enter the language until the 1560s.
ETYMOLOGY: gnatho = Greek, for jaw; ferrum = Greek, for iron, alluding to the consumption of such a dense hardwood as mahogany.
Terentian Phormio is clearly admirable, and Gnatho too, in his character type.
145) Another problem occurs: what did Terence really mean when, in his Eunuch, the interlocutor Gnatho says to Thrason, "I never come to you without departing more learned"?