gnomic


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gno·mic

 (nō′mĭk)
adj.
Marked by aphorisms; aphoristic: gnomic verse; a gnomic style.

gnomic

(ˈnəʊmɪk; ˈnɒm-) or

gnomical

adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) consisting of, containing, or relating to gnomes or aphorisms
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or relating to a writer of such sayings
ˈgnomically adv

gno•mic1

(ˈnoʊ mɪk, ˈnɒm ɪk)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or resembling a gnome.
[1805–15]

gno•mic2

(ˈnoʊ mɪk, ˈnɒm ɪk)

also gno′mi•cal,



adj.
1. like or containing gnomes or aphorisms.
2. pertaining to or noting a writer of aphorisms, esp. any of certain Greek poets.
[1805–15; < Greek gnōmikós. See gnome2, -ic]
gno′mi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gnomic - relating to or containing gnomes; "gnomic verse"
Translations

gnomic

[ˈnəʊmɪk] ADJgnómico

gnomic

[ˈnəʊmɪk] adj [remark] → gnomique

gnomic

[ˈnəʊmɪk] adj (liter) → gnomico/a
References in classic literature ?
If before going to the d'Urbervilles' she had vigorously moved under the guidance of sundry gnomic texts and phrases known to her and to the world in general, no doubt she would never have been imposed on.
The "Precepts of Chiron" was a didactic poem made up of moral and practical precepts, resembling the gnomic sections of the "Works and Days", addressed by the Centaur Chiron to his pupil Achilles.
1): `If a man sow evil, he shall reap evil,' indicates a gnomic element, and the note by Proclus (7) on "Works and Days" 126 makes it likely that metals also were dealt with.
In another section on "focalization and information" (56-60), issues of omniscience, prolepsis, gnomic utterance, but also mind-telling, are taken up.
Fallon is at his best when he trusts the more gnomic side of the impulse that drives his work.
So, then, let me begin with a few general and slightly gnomic remarks about conceptualization.
He compares these examples of gnomic wisdom with Paul's parenesis in Romans 12, pointing out crucial differences between Paul and the Sages.
He was blazingly ambitious, yet also a gnomic guru in his own mind.
The third and last such triptych is a response to Heraclitus's aphorism, "You cannot step into the same river twice"; its literary sources also include the works of the gnomic Argentine novelist Jorge Luis Borges and the brilliant psychologist and cognitive linguist Steven Pinker, whose poetic and influential treatise The Language Instinct offers what could be the epigraph to many of Argue's works: "Speech is a river of breath, bent into hisses and hums by the soft flesh of the mouth and throat.
Dorn's theoretical poetry sidesteps the regularizing tendencies of philosophical vocabulary ("phenomenology"), proposing instead to invoke the concept of experiential immediacy by humorous devices such as offering gnomic paradoxes--"speed is not necessarily fast.