go back


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to go back: Wayback machine

go back

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to return
2. (often foll by to) to originate (in): the links with France go back to the Norman Conquest.
3. (foll by on) to change one's mind about; repudiate (esp in the phrase go back on one's word)
4. (Horology) (of clocks and watches) to be set to an earlier time, as during British Summer Time: when do the clocks go back this year?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.go back - belong to an earlier time; "This story dates back 200 years"
initiate, originate, start - bring into being; "He initiated a new program"; "Start a foundation"
ascend - go back in order of genealogical succession; "Inheritance may not ascend linearly"
2.go back - return in thought or speech to something
hark back, recall, come back, return - go back to something earlier; "This harks back to a previous remark of his"
3.go back - regain a former condition after a financial loss; "We expect the stocks to recover to $2.90"; "The company managed to recuperate"
retrovert, revert, turn back, regress, return - go back to a previous state; "We reverted to the old rules"
rebound, rally - return to a former condition; "The jilted lover soon rallied and found new friends"; "The stock market rallied"

go

verb
1. To move along a particular course:
2. To proceed in a specified direction:
3. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
4. To look to when in need:
5. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
6. To change or fluctuate within limits:
7. To perform a function effectively:
8. To move toward a termination:
9. To have a proper or suitable place:
10. To move past in time.Also used with by:
11. To be depleted:
12. To fall in:
Idiom: give way.
13. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
14. To do or fare well:
Slang: score.
Idioms: get somewhere, go great guns, go strong.
15. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
16. To put up with:
Informal: lump.
Idioms: take it, take it lying down.
17. Informal. To put up as a stake in a game or speculation:
18. Informal. To make an offer of:
phrasal verb
go along
To agree to cooperate or participate:
Informal: play along.
phrasal verb
go around
1. To pass around but not through:
2. To become known far and wide:
Idiom: go the rounds.
phrasal verb
go at
1. To set upon with violent force:
2. To start work on vigorously:
Idiom: hop to it.
phrasal verb
go away
1. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
2. To move toward a termination:
phrasal verb
go back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
go down
1. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
2. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
phrasal verb
go far
To gain success:
phrasal verb
go for
1. Informal. To be favorably disposed toward:
2. Informal. To receive pleasure from:
Slang: dig.
3. To require a specified price:
phrasal verb
go in
To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
phrasal verb
go off
To release or cause to release energy suddenly and violently, especially with a loud noise:
phrasal verb
go on
1. To be in existence or in a certain state for an indefinitely long time:
2. To continue without halting despite difficulties or setbacks:
Idioms: hang in there, keep going , keep it up.
3. Informal. To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially:
Informal: spiel.
Slang: gab, gas, jaw, yak.
phrasal verb
go out
To be with another person socially on a regular basis:
Informal: take out.
phrasal verb
go over
1. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
2. To look at carefully or critically:
Informal: case.
Idiom: give a going-over.
3. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
phrasal verb
go through
To participate in or partake of personally:
Archaic: prove.
phrasal verb
go under
1. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
2. To undergo sudden financial failure:
Informal: fold.
Idioms: go belly up, go bust, go on the rocks, go to the wall.
phrasal verb
go up
To move upward on or along:
phrasal verb
go with
To be in keeping with:
noun
1. A trying to do or make something:
Informal: shot.
Slang: take.
Archaic: assay.
2. A brief trial:
Informal: fling, shot, whack, whirl.
3. A limited, often assigned period of activity, duty, or opportunity:
bout, hitch, inning (often used in plural), shift, spell, stint, stretch, time, tour, trick, turn, watch.
4. Informal. Capacity or power for work or vigorous activity:
adjective
Informal. In a state of preparedness:
Slang: together.
Idioms: all set, in working order.
Translations
يَرْجِعُيَعودُ إلى، يَرْجِعُ
datovat sevrátit se
gå tilbage
palata
potjecati iz
visszamegy
víkja aftur aî
戻る
(…)로 거슬러 올라가다
gå tillbaka
กลับไป
quay lại

go

(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
adjective
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
noun
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.

go back

يَرْجِعُ datovat se gå tilbage zurückgehen ανατρέχω volver palata remonter potjecati iz risalire 戻る (…)로 거슬러 올라가다 teruggaan dra tilbake wrócić datar, voltar брать начало gå tillbaka กลับไป geri gitmek quay lại 回去
References in classic literature ?
The rest of the animals, like the dormice and the water-voles and the bats, they will have to go back and live in the fields where they were born till we come home again.
Because," said he, "you have brought me here twenty-five days' journey, and will leave me to go back alone; and which way shall I get to my port afterwards, without a ship, without a horse, without pecune?
I won't go back," she said; and turning away she opened the door and led the way into the public dining-room.
I went to Strickland and told him I thought he was quite well enough to go back to his own place.
Alice thought she might as well go back, and see how the game was going on, as she heard the Queen's voice in the distance, screaming with passion.
My advice to you is finish your business and go back home to Otradnoe.
I must go back-- no; I can't go back, my letter has put me in their power--Arthur would not take me back
He'd come out to Sixty Mile, planning to go back up Indian River and portage the grub across the divide between Quartz Creek and Gold Bottom-"
No, I go back to Snowfield on Saturday, and I shall have to set out to Treddleston early, to be in time for the Oakbourne carrier.
When the sharing comes, your share is far the largest, and I, forsooth, must go back to my ships, take what I can get and be thankful, when my labour of fighting is done.
they would not go back to the seven days for all they could see.
Anne would not hear of returning to her mother at Welmingham, because she had been removed to the Asylum from that place, and because Sir Percival would be certain to go back there and find her again.