go on


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go 1

 (gō)
v. went (wĕnt), gone (gôn, gŏn), go·ing, goes (gōz)
v.intr.
1. To move or travel; proceed: We will go by bus. Solicitors went from door to door seeking donations. How fast can the boat go?
2. To move away from a place; depart: Go before I cry.
3.
a. To pursue a certain course: messages that go through diplomatic channels to the ambassador.
b. To resort to another, as for aid: went directly to the voters of her district.
4.
a. To extend between two points or in a certain direction; run: curtains that go from the ceiling to the floor.
b. To give entry; lead: a stairway that goes to the basement.
5. To function properly: The car won't go.
6.
a. To have currency.
b. To pass from one person to another; circulate: Wild rumors were going around the office.
7. To pass as the result of a sale: The gold watch went to the highest bidder.
8. Informal Used as an intensifier or to indicate annoyance when joined by and to a coordinate verb: She went and complained to Personnel.
9. Used in the progressive tense with an infinitive to indicate future intent or expectation: I am going to learn how to dance.
10.
a. To continue to be in a certain condition or continue an activity: go barefoot.
b. To come to be in a certain condition: go mad; hair that had gone gray.
c. To continue to be in effect or operation: a lease with one year to go.
d. To carry out an action to a certain point or extent: Your parents went to great expense to put you through college.
11. To be called; be known: Our friend William often goes by Billy.
12.
a. To be customarily located; belong: The fork goes to the left of the plate. Where do the plates go?
b. To be capable of entering or fitting: Will the suitcase go into the trunk of your car?
13.
a. To pass into someone's possession: All the jewelry went to her heirs.
b. To be allotted: How much of your salary goes for rent?
14. To be a contributing factor: It all goes to show us that the project can be completed on time.
15.
a. To have a particular form: as the saying goes.
b. To be such, by and large: well behaved, as big dogs go.
16.
a. To extend in time: The story goes back to the Middle Ages.
b. To pass by; elapse: The day went pleasantly enough until I received your call.
17.
a. To be used up or finished: My interest in such things has gone.
b. To be discarded or abolished: All luxuries will have to go.
18.
a. To become weak; fail: His hearing has started to go.
b. To give way; break up: The dam is about to go.
19. To cease living; die.
20.
a. To happen or develop; fare: How are things going?
b. To have a successful outcome: creativity that made the advertising campaign really go.
21. To be suitable or appropriate as an accessory or accompaniment: a color that goes beautifully with your complexion.
22.
a. To have authority: Whatever I say goes.
b. To be valid, acceptable, or adequate.
23. Informal To urinate or defecate: I left the meeting early because I really had to go!
24. Informal To begin an act: Here goes!
25. Obsolete To walk.
v.tr.
1. To proceed or move according to: I was free to go my own way.
2. To traverse: Only two of the runners went the entire distance.
3. To engage in: went skiing.
4. Informal
a. To bet: go $20 on the black horse.
b. To bid: I'll go $500 on the vase.
5. Informal
a. To take on the responsibility or obligation for: go bail for a client.
b. To participate to (a given extent): Will you go halves with me if we win the lottery?
6. To amount to; weigh: a shark that went 400 pounds.
7. Sports To have as a record: went 3 for 4 against their best pitcher.
8. Informal To enjoy: I could go a cold beer right now.
9. Informal To say or utter. Used chiefly in verbal narration: First I go, "Thank you," then he goes, "What for?"
n. pl. goes
1. The act or an instance of going.
2. An attempt; an effort: had a go at acting.
3. The time or period of an activity.
4. Informal Energy; vitality: had lots of go.
5. Informal
a. The go-ahead.
b. often Go The starting point: "And from Go there was something deliciously illicit about the whole affair" (Erica Abeel).
c. Informal A situation in which planned operations can be effectuated: The space mission is a go.
adj.
Informal Functioning correctly and ready for action: All systems are go.
Phrasal Verbs:
go about
To set about to do; undertake: Go about your chores in a responsible way.
go along
To cooperate: They get along by going along.
go around
1. To satisfy a demand or requirement: just enough food to go around.
2. To go here and there; move from place to place.
3. To have currency: rumors going around.
go at
1. To attack, especially with energy.
2. To approach; undertake: He went at the job with a lot of energy.
go by
1. To elapse; pass: as time goes by.
2. To pay a short visit: My parents were away when we went by last week.
go down
1. To drop below the horizon; set: The sun went down.
2. To fall to the ground: The helicopter went down in a ball of fire.
3. To sink: The torpedoed battleship went down.
4. To experience defeat or ruin.
5. To admit of easy swallowing: a cough syrup that goes down readily.
6. To decrease in cost or value.
7. Chiefly British To leave a university.
8. Slang To occur; happen: "a collection of memorable pieces about the general craziness that was going down in those days" (James Atlas).
9. To be accepted or tolerated: How will your ideas go down as far as corporate marketing is concerned?
10. To come to be remembered in posterity: a debate that will go down as a turning point in the campaign.
11. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio or cunnilingus.
go for
1. To choose or accept: I went for the cheaper cable TV offering.
2. To try to attain: She is going for the record in the broad jump.
3. Informal To have a special liking for: I really go for progressive jazz.
4. To attack: an opponent who is known to go for the jugular in arguments.
5. To pass for or serve as: a couch that also goes for a bed.
go in
1. To take part in a cooperative venture: went in with the others to buy a present.
2. To make an approach, as before an attack: Troops went in at dawn.
go into
1. To discuss or investigate: The book goes into classical mythology.
2. To undertake as a profession or course of study: She's going into medicine.
go off
1. To undergo detonation; explode.
2. To make a noise; sound: The siren went off at noon.
3. To leave: Don't go off mad.
4. Chiefly British To stop consuming or liking: The dog has gone off his food.
5. Informal To adhere to the expected course of events or the expected plan: The project went off smoothly.
6. Chiefly British To become spoiled or rancid: The orange juice has gone off.
go on
1. To take place; happen: didn't know what was going on.
2. To continue: Life must go on.
3. To keep on doing (something): Don't go on talking.
4. To proceed: She went on to become a senator.
5. Informal To talk volubly: My, you do go on.
go out
1. To become extinguished.
2. To go outdoors; leave one's residence: He went out at 7:00.
3. To take part in social life outside the home: goes out a lot.
4. To be romantically involved: They've been going out for two years.
5. To feel sympathy or pity: My heart goes out to the storm victims.
6. To become unfashionable: High boots went out last year.
7. To undergo structural collapse: The bridge went out.
go over
1. To gain acceptance or approval: a new style that didn't go over.
2. To examine or review: go over the test scores.
go through
1. To examine carefully: went through the students' papers.
2. To experience or be subjected to: We went through hell while working on this project.
3. To perform: I went through the sonata in 30 minutes.
go under
1. To suffer defeat or destruction; fail.
2. To lose consciousness.
go up
1. To increase in price or value.
2. To be in the process of construction: Office buildings went up all over town.
3. Chiefly British To go to a university.
go with
1. To date (someone) regularly.
2. To select or choose: decided to go with the pink wallpaper.
Idioms:
from the word go
From the very beginning.
go all the way
Slang To have sexual intercourse.
go back on
To fail to honor or keep: go back on a promise.
go begging
To be in little or no demand: "Prestige or no prestige, directors' jobs at some companies have actually gone begging" (Bill Powell).
go belly up Informal
To undergo total financial failure: "A record number of ... banks went belly up" (New Republic).
go bust Informal
To undergo financial collapse: "Railroads were in the news mainly when they were going bust" (Christian Science Monitor).
go by the board
To be discarded or ignored: old dress codes that have now gone by the board.
go down the line
To provide strong support.
go fly a kite Informal
To cease being an annoyance. Often used in the imperative.
go for broke Informal
To commit or expend all of one's available resources toward achievement of a goal: "Why not go for broke and take on somebody who is quite young and see what he does?" (Roger L. Stevens).
go for it Informal
To expend all one's strength and resources toward achievement of an end or purpose.
go in for
1. To have interest in: goes in for classical music.
2. To take part in: goes in for water skiing.
going forward
In the near future: We expect business to improve going forward.
go in with
To join in or combine with: He'll go in with them on the plan.
go it alone
To undertake a project, trip, or responsibility without the presence or help of others.
go missing
To become lost, especially to disappear suddenly: My cat has gone missing. Her wallet went missing yesterday.
go off the deep end
To behave hysterically or very recklessly.
go one better
To surpass or outdo by one degree: He's gone me one better.
go out for
To seek to become a participant in: go out for varsity soccer.
go out of (one's) way
To inconvenience oneself in doing something beyond what is required.
go out the window Informal
To become insignificant or inoperative: "As soon as a third body is introduced to the Newtonian system, all lawful ordering of processes goes out the window" (Fusion).
go places Informal
To be on the way to success: a young executive who is clearly going places.
go steady
To date someone exclusively.
go the distance
To carry a course of action through to completion.
go there
Informal To pursue a subject in conversation: How's my job? Let's not go there.
go the vole
To risk all of one's resources in the prospect of achieving great gains.
go to extremes
To do something to an extreme degree or behave in an unrestrained manner.
go to it
To begin something right away.
go to (one's) head
1. To make one dizzy or inebriated.
2. To make one proud or conceited.
go to pieces
1. To become emotionally upset or distraught.
2. To suffer the loss of one's health.
go to the mat Informal
To fight or dispute until one side or another is victorious: The governor will go to the mat with the legislature over the controversial spending bill.
go to the wall Informal
1. To lose a conflict or be defeated; yield: Despite their efforts, the team went to the wall.
2. To be forced into bankruptcy; fail.
3. To make an all-out effort, especially in defending another.
go to town Informal
1. To work or perform efficiently and rapidly.
2. To be highly successful.
go up in flames/smoke
To be utterly destroyed.
go without saying
To be self-evident: It goes without saying that success is the product of hard work.
on the go
Constantly busy or active.
to go
1. To be taken out, as restaurant food or drink: coffee and doughnuts to go.
2. Still to be done or dealt with; remaining: I've got two exams down and two to go.

[Middle English gon, from Old English gān; see ghē- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language Go has long been used to describe the production of nonlinguistic noises, notably in conversation with children, as in The train went "toot." The cow goes "moo." Within the past few decades, however, many speakers began to use go informally to report speech, as in Then he goes, "You think you're real smart, don't you?" This usage parallels the quotation introducers be like and be all. But unlike these other expressions, which can indicate thoughts or attitudes, this use of go is largely restricted to dialogue related in the narrative present, especially when the narrator wishes to mimic the accent or intonation of the original speaker. See Note at like2

go 2

 (gō)
n.
A board game of Chinese origin in which two players take turns placing counters on the points formed by the intersection of 19 vertical and 19 horizontal lines.

[Japanese, of Chinese origin, possibly from Early Middle Chinese gı̷ (also the source of Mandarin ).]

go on

vb (intr, mainly adverb)
1. to continue or proceed
2. to happen or take place: there's something peculiar going on here.
3. (of power, a water supply, etc) to start to be available, running, or functioning
4. (preposition) to mount or board and ride on, esp as a treat: children love to go on donkeys at the seaside.
5. (Theatre) theatre to make an entrance on stage
6. to act or behave: he goes on as though he's rich.
7. to talk excessively; chatter
8. to continue talking, esp after a short pause: 'When I am Prime Minister,' he went on, 'we shall abolish taxes.'.
9. (foll by at) to criticize or nag: stop going on at me all the time!.
10. (preposition) to use as a basis for further thought or action: the police had no evidence at all to go on in the murder case.
11. (foll by for) Brit to approach (a time, age, amount, etc): he's going on for his hundredth birthday.
12. (Cricket) cricket to start to bowl
13. to take one's turn
14. (Clothing & Fashion) (of clothes) to be capable of being put on
15. go much on (used with a negative) Brit to care for; like
16. something to go on something to be going on with something that is adequate for the present time
interj
I don't believe what you're saying

go on

If you go on doing something, you continue to do it.

I just went on eating like I hadn't heard anything.
Asif went on working until he had finished.

If you go on to do something, you do it after doing something else.

She went on to talk about her plans for the future.
He later went on to form a successful computer company.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.go on - continue a certain state, condition, or activity; "Keep on working!"; "We continued to work into the night"; "Keep smiling"; "We went on working until well past midnight"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
preserve, uphold, carry on, continue, bear on - keep or maintain in unaltered condition; cause to remain or last; "preserve the peace in the family"; "continue the family tradition"; "Carry on the old traditions"
hold - remain in a certain state, position, or condition; "The weather held"; "They held on the road and kept marching"
keep going, run on - continue uninterrupted; "The disease will run on unchecked"; "The party kept going until 4 A.M."
ride - continue undisturbed and without interference; "Let it ride"
continue - continue after an interruption; "The demonstration continued after a break for lunch"
2.go on - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"
recrudesce, develop, break - happen; "Report the news as it develops"; "These political movements recrudesce from time to time"
come up, arise - result or issue; "A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion"
result - come about or follow as a consequence; "nothing will result from this meeting"
intervene - occur between other event or between certain points of time; "the war intervened between the birth of her two children"
transpire - come about, happen, or occur; "Several important events transpired last week"
give - occur; "what gives?"
operate - happen; "What is going on in the minds of the people?"
supervene - take place as an additional or unexpected development
proceed, go - follow a certain course; "The inauguration went well"; "how did your interview go?"
come - come to pass; arrive, as in due course; "The first success came three days later"; "It came as a shock"; "Dawn comes early in June"
fall - occur at a specified time or place; "Christmas falls on a Monday this year"; "The accent falls on the first syllable"
anticipate - be a forerunner of or occur earlier than; "This composition anticipates Impressionism"
develop - be gradually disclosed or unfolded; become manifest; "The plot developed slowly";
recur, repeat - happen or occur again; "This is a recurring story"
come off, go over, go off - happen in a particular manner; "how did your talk go over?"
roll around, come around - happen regularly; "Christmas rolled around again"
materialise, materialize, happen - come into being; become reality; "Her dream really materialized"
bechance, befall, happen - happen, occur, or be the case in the course of events or by chance; "It happens that today is my birthday"; "These things befell" (Santayana)
bechance, befall, betide - become of; happen to; "He promised that no harm would befall her"; "What has become of my children?"
coincide, concur - happen simultaneously; "The two events coincided"
backfire, backlash, recoil - come back to the originator of an action with an undesired effect; "Your comments may backfire and cause you a lot of trouble"
chance - be the case by chance; "I chanced to meet my old friend in the street"
break - happen or take place; "Things have been breaking pretty well for us in the past few months"
fall, shine, strike - touch or seem as if touching visually or audibly; "Light fell on her face"; "The sun shone on the fields"; "The light struck the golden necklace"; "A strange sound struck my ears"
turn out - prove to be in the result or end; "It turns out that he was right"
contemporise, contemporize, synchronise, synchronize - happen at the same time
3.go on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sensego on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; "Time marches on"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
forge - move ahead steadily; "He forged ahead"
penetrate - make one's way deeper into or through; "The hikers did not manage to penetrate the dense forest"
creep up, sneak up - advance stealthily or unnoticed; "Age creeps up on you"
encroach, impinge, infringe - advance beyond the usual limit
plough on, press on, push on - continue moving forward
string along, string - move or come along
overhaul, overtake, pass - travel past; "The sports car passed all the trucks"
close in, draw in - advance or converge on; "The police were closing in on him"
edge, inch - advance slowly, as if by inches; "He edged towards the car"
rachet up, ratchet, ratchet down - move by degrees in one direction only; "a ratcheting lopping tool"
elapse, glide by, go by, slide by, slip by, slip away, go along, pass, lapse - pass by; "three years elapsed"
4.go on - continue talking; "I know it's hard," he continued, "but there is no choice"; "carry on--pretend we are not in the room"
segue - proceed without interruption; in music or talk; "He segued into another discourse"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"
jog, ramble, ramble on - continue talking or writing in a desultory manner; "This novel rambles on and jogs"
5.go on - start running, functioning, or operating; "the lights went on"; "the computer came up"
get going, start, go - begin or set in motion; "I start at eight in the morning"; "Ready, set, go!"
go off - stop running, functioning, or operating; "Our power went off during the hurricane"

go

verb
1. To move along a particular course:
2. To proceed in a specified direction:
3. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
4. To look to when in need:
5. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
6. To change or fluctuate within limits:
7. To perform a function effectively:
8. To move toward a termination:
9. To have a proper or suitable place:
10. To move past in time.Also used with by:
11. To be depleted:
12. To fall in:
Idiom: give way.
13. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
14. To do or fare well:
Slang: score.
Idioms: get somewhere, go great guns, go strong.
15. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
16. To put up with:
Informal: lump.
Idioms: take it, take it lying down.
17. Informal. To put up as a stake in a game or speculation:
18. Informal. To make an offer of:
phrasal verb
go along
To agree to cooperate or participate:
Informal: play along.
phrasal verb
go around
1. To pass around but not through:
2. To become known far and wide:
Idiom: go the rounds.
phrasal verb
go at
1. To set upon with violent force:
2. To start work on vigorously:
Idiom: hop to it.
phrasal verb
go away
1. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
2. To move toward a termination:
phrasal verb
go back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
go down
1. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
2. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
phrasal verb
go far
To gain success:
phrasal verb
go for
1. Informal. To be favorably disposed toward:
2. Informal. To receive pleasure from:
Slang: dig.
3. To require a specified price:
phrasal verb
go in
To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
phrasal verb
go off
To release or cause to release energy suddenly and violently, especially with a loud noise:
phrasal verb
go on
1. To be in existence or in a certain state for an indefinitely long time:
2. To continue without halting despite difficulties or setbacks:
Idioms: hang in there, keep going , keep it up.
3. Informal. To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially:
Informal: spiel.
Slang: gab, gas, jaw, yak.
phrasal verb
go out
To be with another person socially on a regular basis:
Informal: take out.
phrasal verb
go over
1. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
2. To look at carefully or critically:
Informal: case.
Idiom: give a going-over.
3. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
phrasal verb
go through
To participate in or partake of personally:
Archaic: prove.
phrasal verb
go under
1. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
2. To undergo sudden financial failure:
Informal: fold.
Idioms: go belly up, go bust, go on the rocks, go to the wall.
phrasal verb
go up
To move upward on or along:
phrasal verb
go with
To be in keeping with:
noun
1. A trying to do or make something:
Informal: shot.
Slang: take.
Archaic: assay.
2. A brief trial:
Informal: fling, shot, whack, whirl.
3. A limited, often assigned period of activity, duty, or opportunity:
bout, hitch, inning (often used in plural), shift, spell, stint, stretch, time, tour, trick, turn, watch.
4. Informal. Capacity or power for work or vigorous activity:
adjective
Informal. In a state of preparedness:
Slang: together.
Idioms: all set, in working order.
Translations
يَتَكَلَّم كَثيراًيَحْدُثيَسْتَمِريَسْتَمِر في التَّحْقيقيَسْتَمِرُّ
pokračovatvycházetdít semoc mluvit
fortsættegå efterholde sig tilkværne løsblive ved med at tale om
jatkaamatkustaamennä
nastaviti
alapítmondja
byggja ágerast, vera á seyîihalda áframhaltu áframorîlengja um, láta dæluna ganga
続ける
계속하다
perge
diať sa
fortsätta
ดำเนินการต่อไป
devam etmekesas almakolmakolup bitmeksürekli konuşmak
tiếp tục

go

(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
adjective
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
noun
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.

go on

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References in classic literature ?
Fanny did n't seem inclined to talk much, and Tom would go on in such a ridiculous manner that Polly told him she would n't listen and began to hum bits of the opera.
It was not fair of her to treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind with which heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating up your estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she gets all the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.
He determined to go to the village, in the first place, attend to his business for an hour, and give notice to Burge of his being obliged to go on a journey, which he must beg him not to mention to any one; for he wished to avoid going to the Hall Farm near breakfast-time, when the children and servants would be in the house-place, and there must be exclamations in their hearing about his having returned without Hetty.
We shall drive directly to Clifton and dine there; and, as soon as dinner is over, if there is time for it, go on to Kingsweston.