go out

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go 1

v. went (wĕnt), gone (gôn, gŏn), go·ing, goes (gōz)
1. To move or travel; proceed: We will go by bus. Solicitors went from door to door seeking donations. How fast can the boat go?
2. To move away from a place; depart: Go before I cry.
a. To pursue a certain course: messages that go through diplomatic channels to the ambassador.
b. To resort to another, as for aid: went directly to the voters of her district.
a. To extend between two points or in a certain direction; run: curtains that go from the ceiling to the floor.
b. To give entry; lead: a stairway that goes to the basement.
5. To function properly: The car won't go.
a. To have currency.
b. To pass from one person to another; circulate: Wild rumors were going around the office.
7. To pass as the result of a sale: The gold watch went to the highest bidder.
8. Informal Used as an intensifier or to indicate annoyance when joined by and to a coordinate verb: She went and complained to Personnel.
9. Used in the progressive tense with an infinitive to indicate future intent or expectation: I am going to learn how to dance.
a. To continue to be in a certain condition or continue an activity: go barefoot.
b. To come to be in a certain condition: go mad; hair that had gone gray.
c. To continue to be in effect or operation: a lease with one year to go.
d. To carry out an action to a certain point or extent: Your parents went to great expense to put you through college.
11. To be called; be known: Our friend William often goes by Billy.
a. To be customarily located; belong: The fork goes to the left of the plate. Where do the plates go?
b. To be capable of entering or fitting: Will the suitcase go into the trunk of your car?
a. To pass into someone's possession: All the jewelry went to her heirs.
b. To be allotted: How much of your salary goes for rent?
14. To be a contributing factor: It all goes to show us that the project can be completed on time.
a. To have a particular form: as the saying goes.
b. To be such, by and large: well behaved, as big dogs go.
a. To extend in time: The story goes back to the Middle Ages.
b. To pass by; elapse: The day went pleasantly enough until I received your call.
a. To be used up or finished: My interest in such things has gone.
b. To be discarded or abolished: All luxuries will have to go.
a. To become weak; fail: His hearing has started to go.
b. To give way; break up: The dam is about to go.
19. To cease living; die.
a. To happen or develop; fare: How are things going?
b. To have a successful outcome: creativity that made the advertising campaign really go.
21. To be suitable or appropriate as an accessory or accompaniment: a color that goes beautifully with your complexion.
a. To have authority: Whatever I say goes.
b. To be valid, acceptable, or adequate.
23. Informal To urinate or defecate: I left the meeting early because I really had to go!
24. Informal To begin an act: Here goes!
25. Obsolete To walk.
1. To proceed or move according to: I was free to go my own way.
2. To traverse: Only two of the runners went the entire distance.
3. To engage in: went skiing.
4. Informal
a. To bet: go $20 on the black horse.
b. To bid: I'll go $500 on the vase.
5. Informal
a. To take on the responsibility or obligation for: go bail for a client.
b. To participate to (a given extent): Will you go halves with me if we win the lottery?
6. To amount to; weigh: a shark that went 400 pounds.
7. Sports To have as a record: went 3 for 4 against their best pitcher.
8. Informal To enjoy: I could go a cold beer right now.
9. Informal To say or utter. Used chiefly in verbal narration: First I go, "Thank you," then he goes, "What for?"
n. pl. goes
1. The act or an instance of going.
2. An attempt; an effort: had a go at acting.
3. The time or period of an activity.
4. Informal Energy; vitality: had lots of go.
5. Informal
a. The go-ahead.
b. often Go The starting point: "And from Go there was something deliciously illicit about the whole affair" (Erica Abeel).
c. Informal A situation in which planned operations can be effectuated: The space mission is a go.
Informal Functioning correctly and ready for action: All systems are go.
Phrasal Verbs:
go about
To set about to do; undertake: Go about your chores in a responsible way.
go along
To cooperate: They get along by going along.
go around
1. To satisfy a demand or requirement: just enough food to go around.
2. To go here and there; move from place to place.
3. To have currency: rumors going around.
go at
1. To attack, especially with energy.
2. To approach; undertake: He went at the job with a lot of energy.
go by
1. To elapse; pass: as time goes by.
2. To pay a short visit: My parents were away when we went by last week.
go down
1. To drop below the horizon; set: The sun went down.
2. To fall to the ground: The helicopter went down in a ball of fire.
3. To sink: The torpedoed battleship went down.
4. To experience defeat or ruin.
5. To admit of easy swallowing: a cough syrup that goes down readily.
6. To decrease in cost or value.
7. Chiefly British To leave a university.
8. Slang To occur; happen: "a collection of memorable pieces about the general craziness that was going down in those days" (James Atlas).
9. To be accepted or tolerated: How will your ideas go down as far as corporate marketing is concerned?
10. To come to be remembered in posterity: a debate that will go down as a turning point in the campaign.
11. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio or cunnilingus.
go for
1. To choose or accept: I went for the cheaper cable TV offering.
2. To try to attain: She is going for the record in the broad jump.
3. Informal To have a special liking for: I really go for progressive jazz.
4. To attack: an opponent who is known to go for the jugular in arguments.
5. To pass for or serve as: a couch that also goes for a bed.
go in
1. To take part in a cooperative venture: went in with the others to buy a present.
2. To make an approach, as before an attack: Troops went in at dawn.
go into
1. To discuss or investigate: The book goes into classical mythology.
2. To undertake as a profession or course of study: She's going into medicine.
go off
1. To undergo detonation; explode.
2. To make a noise; sound: The siren went off at noon.
3. To leave: Don't go off mad.
4. Chiefly British To stop consuming or liking: The dog has gone off his food.
5. Informal To adhere to the expected course of events or the expected plan: The project went off smoothly.
6. Chiefly British To become spoiled or rancid: The orange juice has gone off.
go on
1. To take place; happen: didn't know what was going on.
2. To continue: Life must go on.
3. To keep on doing (something): Don't go on talking.
4. To proceed: She went on to become a senator.
5. Informal To talk volubly: My, you do go on.
go out
1. To become extinguished.
2. To go outdoors; leave one's residence: He went out at 7:00.
3. To take part in social life outside the home: goes out a lot.
4. To go out on dates or be romantically involved.
5. To feel sympathy or pity: My heart goes out to the storm victims.
6. To become unfashionable: High boots went out last year.
7. To undergo structural collapse: The bridge went out.
go over
1. To gain acceptance or approval: a new style that didn't go over.
2. To examine or review: go over the test scores.
go through
1. To examine carefully: went through the students' papers.
2. To experience: We went through hell while working on this project.
3. To perform: I went through the sonata in 30 minutes.
go under
1. To suffer defeat or destruction; fail.
2. To lose consciousness.
go up
1. To increase in price or value.
2. To be in the process of construction: Office buildings went up all over town.
3. Chiefly British To go to a university.
go with
1. To date (someone) regularly.
2. To select or choose: decided to go with the pink wallpaper.
from the word go
From the very beginning.
go all the way
Slang To have sexual intercourse.
go back on
To fail to honor or keep: go back on a promise.
go begging
To be in little or no demand: "Prestige or no prestige, directors' jobs at some companies have actually gone begging" (Bill Powell).
go belly up Informal
To undergo total financial failure: "A record number of ... banks went belly up" (New Republic).
go bust Informal
To undergo financial collapse: "Railroads were in the news mainly when they were going bust" (Christian Science Monitor).
go by the board
To be discarded or ignored: old dress codes that have now gone by the board.
go down the line
To provide strong support.
go fly a kite Informal
To cease being an annoyance. Often used in the imperative.
go for broke Informal
To commit or expend all of one's available resources toward achievement of a goal: "Why not go for broke and take on somebody who is quite young and see what he does?" (Roger L. Stevens).
go for it Informal
To expend all one's strength and resources toward achievement of an end or purpose.
go in for
1. To have interest in: goes in for classical music.
2. To take part in: goes in for water skiing.
going forward
In the near future: We expect business to improve going forward.
go in with
To join in or combine with: He'll go in with them on the plan.
go it alone
To undertake a project, trip, or responsibility without the presence or help of others.
go missing
To become lost, especially to disappear suddenly: My cat has gone missing. Her wallet went missing yesterday.
go off the deep end
To behave hysterically or very recklessly.
go one better
To surpass or outdo by one degree: He's gone me one better.
go out for
To seek to become a participant in: go out for varsity soccer.
go out of (one's) way
To inconvenience oneself in doing something beyond what is required.
go out the window Informal
To become insignificant or inoperative: "As soon as a third body is introduced to the Newtonian system, all lawful ordering of processes goes out the window" (Fusion).
go places Informal
To be on the way to success: a young executive who is clearly going places.
go steady
To date someone exclusively.
go the distance
To carry a course of action through to completion.
go there
Informal To pursue a subject in conversation: How's my job? Let's not go there.
go the vole
To risk all of one's resources in the prospect of achieving great gains.
go to extremes
To do something to an extreme degree or behave in an unrestrained manner.
go to it
To begin something right away.
go to (one's) head
1. To make one dizzy or inebriated.
2. To make one proud or conceited.
go to pieces
1. To become emotionally upset or distraught.
2. To suffer the loss of one's health.
go to the mat Informal
To fight or dispute until one side or another is victorious: The governor will go to the mat with the legislature over the controversial spending bill.
go to the wall Informal
1. To lose a conflict or be defeated; yield: Despite their efforts, the team went to the wall.
2. To be forced into bankruptcy; fail.
3. To make an all-out effort, especially in defending another.
go to town Informal
1. To work or perform efficiently and rapidly.
2. To be highly successful.
go up in flames/smoke
To be utterly destroyed.
go without saying
To be self-evident: It goes without saying that success is the product of hard work.
on the go
Constantly busy or active.
to go
1. To be taken out, as restaurant food or drink: coffee and doughnuts to go.
2. Still to be done or dealt with; remaining: I've got two exams down and two to go.

[Middle English gon, from Old English gān; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language Go has long been used to describe the production of nonlinguistic noises, notably in conversation with children, as in The train went "toot." The cow goes "moo." Within the past few decades, however, many speakers began to use go informally to report speech, as in Then he goes, "You think you're real smart, don't you?" This usage parallels the quotation introducers be like and be all. But unlike these other expressions, which can indicate thoughts or attitudes, this use of go is largely restricted to dialogue related in the narrative present, especially when the narrator wishes to mimic the accent or intonation of the original speaker. See Note at like2.

go 2

A board game of Chinese origin in which two players take turns placing counters on the points formed by the intersection of 19 vertical and 19 horizontal lines.

[Japanese, of Chinese origin, possibly from Early Middle Chinese gı̷ (also the source of Mandarin ).]

go out

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to depart from a room, house, country, etc
2. to cease to illuminate, burn, or function: the fire has gone out.
3. to cease to be fashionable or popular: that style went out ages ago!.
4. to become unconscious or fall asleep: she went out like a light.
5. (Broadcasting) (of a broadcast) to be transmitted
6. to go to entertainments, social functions, etc
7. (usually foll by: with or together) to associate (with a person of the opposite sex) regularly; date
8. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) (of workers) to begin to strike
9. (foll by to) to be extended (to): our sympathy went out to her on the death of her sister.
10. (Card Games) cards to get rid of the last card, token, etc, in one's hand
11. go all out to make a great effort to achieve or obtain something: he went all out to pass the exam.

go out

get outget off
1. 'go out'

When you leave a building or room, you usually say that you go out of it or go out

He threw down his napkin and went out of the room.
I went out into the garden.
2. 'get out'

When you leave a car, you say that you get out of it or get out.

We got out of the taxi at the station.
I got out and examined the right rear wheel.

You also say that you get out of a lift, plane, or small boat.

3. 'get off'

When you leave a bus or train, you say that you get off.

When the train stopped, he got off.
Get off at the next stop.

You can also say that you get off a plane.

Be Careful!
You never say that someone 'goes out' of any kind of vehicle.

4. leaving with difficulty

If you leave a building or room with difficulty, you say that you get out of it or get out.

I managed to get out through a window.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.go out - move out of or depart fromgo out - move out of or depart from; "leave the room"; "the fugitive has left the country"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
depart, go away, go - move away from a place into another direction; "Go away before I start to cry"; "The train departs at noon"
pop out - exit briefly; "He popped out for a quick coffee break"
file out - march out, in a file
hop out, get off - get out of quickly; "The officer hopped out when he spotted an illegally parked car"
fall out - leave (a barracks) in order to take a place in a military formation, or leave a military formation; "the soldiers fell out"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
get off - leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
step out - go outside a room or building for a short period of time
eject - leave an aircraft rapidly, using an ejection seat or capsule
undock - move out of a dock; "We docked at noon"
log off, log out - exit a computer; "Please log off before you go home"
2.go out - leave the house to go somewhere; "We never went out when our children were small"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
date - go on a date with; "Tonight she is dating a former high school sweetheart"
3.go out - take the field; "The soldiers went out on missions"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
4.go out - become extinguished; "The lights suddenly went out and we were in the dark"
end, cease, terminate, finish, stop - have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense; either spatial or metaphorical; "the bronchioles terminate in a capillary bed"; "Your rights stop where you infringe upon the rights of other"; "My property ends by the bushes"; "The symphony ends in a pianissimo"
5.go out - go out of fashion; become unfashionable
fashion - the latest and most admired style in clothes and cosmetics and behavior
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
come in - come into fashion; become fashionable
6.go out - date regularly; have a steady relationship with; "Did you know that she is seeing an older man?"; "He is dating his former wife again!"
date - go on a date with; "Tonight she is dating a former high school sweetheart"
affiliate, assort, consort, associate - keep company with; hang out with; "He associates with strange people"; "She affiliates with her colleagues"


1. To move along a particular course:
2. To proceed in a specified direction:
3. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
4. To look to when in need:
5. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
6. To change or fluctuate within limits:
7. To perform a function effectively:
8. To move toward a termination:
9. To have a proper or suitable place:
10. To move past in time.Also used with by:
11. To be depleted:
12. To fall in:
Idiom: give way.
13. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
14. To do or fare well:
Slang: score.
Idioms: get somewhere, go great guns, go strong.
15. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
16. To put up with:
Informal: lump.
Idioms: take it, take it lying down.
17. Informal. To put up as a stake in a game or speculation:
18. Informal. To make an offer of:
phrasal verb
go along
To agree to cooperate or participate:
Informal: play along.
phrasal verb
go around
1. To pass around but not through:
2. To become known far and wide:
Idiom: go the rounds.
phrasal verb
go at
1. To set upon with violent force:
2. To start work on vigorously:
Idiom: hop to it.
phrasal verb
go away
1. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
2. To move toward a termination:
phrasal verb
go back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
go down
1. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
2. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
phrasal verb
go far
To gain success:
phrasal verb
go for
1. Informal. To be favorably disposed toward:
2. Informal. To receive pleasure from:
Slang: dig.
3. To require a specified price:
phrasal verb
go in
To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
phrasal verb
go off
To release or cause to release energy suddenly and violently, especially with a loud noise:
phrasal verb
go on
1. To be in existence or in a certain state for an indefinitely long time:
2. To continue without halting despite difficulties or setbacks:
Idioms: hang in there, keep going , keep it up.
3. Informal. To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially:
Informal: spiel.
Slang: gab, gas, jaw, yak.
phrasal verb
go out
To be with another person socially on a regular basis:
Informal: take out.
phrasal verb
go over
1. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
2. To look at carefully or critically:
Informal: case.
Idiom: give a going-over.
3. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
phrasal verb
go through
To participate in or partake of personally:
Archaic: prove.
phrasal verb
go under
1. To undergo capture, defeat, or ruin:
2. To undergo sudden financial failure:
Informal: fold.
Idioms: go belly up, go bust, go on the rocks, go to the wall.
phrasal verb
go up
To move upward on or along:
phrasal verb
go with
To be in keeping with:
1. A trying to do or make something:
Informal: shot.
Slang: take.
Archaic: assay.
2. A brief trial:
Informal: fling, shot, whack, whirl.
3. A limited, often assigned period of activity, duty, or opportunity:
bout, hitch, inning (often used in plural), shift, spell, stint, stretch, time, tour, trick, turn, watch.
4. Informal. Capacity or power for work or vigorous activity:
Informal. In a state of preparedness:
Slang: together.
Idioms: all set, in working order.
يَخْرُجُيَخْرُج إلى الحَفَلاتيَخْرُج بِرِفْقَةيَنْطَفِئ، يَخْبو
choditchodit do společnostivyrazit sizhasnout
gå udkomme sammen med
mennä ulos
járkialsziktársaságba jár
fara útfara út meîslokkna
chodiť do spoločnosti
gå ut
ออกไปข้างนอก, ไปเที่ยว
dışarı çıkmaksönmekbirlikte olmakçıkmak
đi chơi


(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.

go out

يَخْرُجُ vyrazit si gå ud ausgehen βγαίνω salir mennä ulos sortir izaći uscire 外出する 외출하다 uitgaan gå ut wyjść sair бывать в обществе gå ut ออกไปข้างนอก, ไปเที่ยว dışarı çıkmak đi chơi 出去消遣
References in classic literature ?
It's well enough for me to go out with Laurie, but not well enough to go to the Hummels'," said Jo, laughing, but looking a little ashamed of her inconsistency.
Poyser desired him emphatically not to come back without Hetty, for she had been quite too long away, considering the things she had to get ready by the middle of March, and a week was surely enough for any one to go out for their health.
Every morning he used to go out fishing, and whatever fish he caught he sold to the King.