goddess

(redirected from goddesshood)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

god·dess

 (gŏd′ĭs)
n.
1. A female being of supernatural powers or attributes, believed in and worshiped by a people.
2. often Goddess A female being believed to be the source of life and being and worshiped as the principal deity in various religions. Used with the.
3. An image of a female supernatural being; an idol.
4. Something, such as fame or wealth, that is worshiped or idealized.
5. A woman of great beauty or grace.

goddess

(ˈɡɒdɪs)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a female divinity
2. a woman who is adored or idealized, esp by a man
ˈgoddessˌhood, ˈgoddess-ˌship n

god•dess

(ˈgɒd ɪs)

n.
1. a female god or deity.
2. a greatly admired or adored woman.
3. a woman of great beauty.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.goddess - a female deitygoddess - a female deity      
deity, divinity, god, immortal - any supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force
earth goddess, earth-goddess - a goddess of fertility and vegetation
Translations
jumalatar
Istennő
女神
Dea
Dumnezeiţă
bohyňa
boginja
gudinna

goddess

[ˈgɒdɪs] Ndiosa f

goddess

[ˈgɒdɛs] n
(= female god) → déesse f
the moon goddess → la déesse de la lune sex goddess

goddess

nGöttin f

goddess

[ˈgɒdɪs] ndea
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Frankel points out the significance of the gender of the "Big Bad" for each season, as Buffy struggles against patriarchal enemies in the early seasons (The Master, Angelus, the Mayor), then Terrible Mothers (Maggie Walsh, Glory), and more nuanced, diffuse, or internal evils in the end (the return to the mundane world and the banality of the Trio, the despair engendered by the First and the temptations of power, the tyranny of her own goddesshood in Season Eight).
In the first part of the book, Frankel details the steps of the heroine's journey, from growing up in the ordinary world to the journey through the unconscious, facing and integrating her dark side, and goddesshood.
Domestic goddesshood is definitely back, and, if only as a fantasy, a lot of women are buying it: It wasn't men who made Martha Stewart a multimillionaire.