godly

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Related to godlier: godly

god·ly

 (gŏd′lē)
adj. god·li·er, god·li·est
1. Having great reverence for God; pious.
2. Divine.

god′li·ness n.

godly

(ˈɡɒdlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
having a religious character; pious; devout: a godly man.
ˈgodlily adv
ˈgodliness n

god•ly

(ˈgɒd li)

adj. -li•er, -li•est.
1. obeying and revering God; devout.
2. coming from God; divine.
[before 1000]
god′li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.godly - showing great reverence for god; "a godly man"; "leading a godly life"
pious - having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity; "pious readings"
2.godly - emanating from God; "divine judgment"; "divine guidance"; "everything is black or white...satanic or godly"-Saturday Review
heavenly - of or belonging to heaven or god

godly

adjective devout, religious, holy, righteous, pious, good, saintly, god-fearing a learned and godly preacher

godly

adjective
1. Deeply concerned with God and the beliefs and practice of religion:
2. Of, from, like, or being a god or God:
Translations
تَقي، ورع
zbožný
fromgudfrygtig
guîhræddur, trúrækinn

godly

[ˈgɒdlɪ] ADJ (godlier (compar) (godliest (superl))) → devoto

godly

[ˈgɒdli] adj (= religious) [person] → dévot(e); [life] → pieux/euse

godly

adj (+er)fromm, gottesfürchtig

godly

[ˈgɒdlɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → pio/a

God

(god) noun
1. (with capital) the creator and ruler of the world (in the Christian, Jewish etc religions).
2. (feminine ˈgoddess) a supernatural being who is worshipped. the gods of Greece and Rome.
ˈgodly adjective
religious. a godly man/life.
ˈgodliness noun
ˈgodchild, ˈgoddaughter, ˈgodson nouns
a child who has a godparent or godparents.
ˈgodfather, ˈgodmother, ˈgodparent nouns
a person who, at a child's baptism, promises to take an active interest in its welfare.
ˈgodsend noun
a very welcome piece of unexpected good luck. Your cheque was an absolute godsend.
References in classic literature ?
In these warm lines the heart will trust itself, as it will not to the tongue, and pour out the prophecy of a godlier existence than all the annals of heroism have yet made good.
Others, including Novak, have stressed the role of providence and spiritual autobiography, regarding the island's landscape as less material than allegorical, as a metaphysical testing ground that guides its inhabitant to godlier ways (Hunter, Reluctant Pilgrim; Starr).