going


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Related to going: Going concern, Going the Distance

go·ing

 (gō′ĭng)
n.
1. Departure: comings and goings.
2. The condition underfoot as it affects one's headway in walking or riding: Once we left the trail the going was rough.
3. Informal Progress toward a goal; headway: It was easy going during my senior year.
adj.
1. Working; running: a machine in going order.
2. In full operation; flourishing: a going business.
3. Current; prevailing: The going rates are high.
4. To be found; available: the best products going.
Idiom:
going on
Approaching: The child is six, going on seven years of age.

going

(ˈɡəʊɪŋ)
n
1. a departure or farewell
2. the condition of a surface such as a road or field with regard to walking, riding, etc: muddy going.
3. informal speed, progress, etc: we made good going on the trip.
adj
4. thriving (esp in the phrase a going concern)
5. (Commerce) current or accepted, as from past negotiations or commercial operation: the going rate for electricians; the going value of the firm.
6. (postpositive) available: the best going.
7. (Commerce) going, going, gone! a statement by an auctioneer that the bidding has finished

go•ing

(ˈgoʊ ɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of leaving; departure: comings and goings.
2. the condition of surfaces, as those of roads, for walking or driving: The going was bad.
3. progress; advancement: slow going on the work.
4. Usu., goings. behavior; conduct; deportment.
adj.
5. moving or working, as machinery.
6. active, alive, or existing.
7. continuing to operate or do business, esp. successfully: Their company is now a going concern.
8. current; prevalent; usual: the going price of houses.
9. leaving; departing.
Idioms:
1. get going, to begin; get started.
2. going away, by a wide margin, esp. as established in the late stages of a sports contest.
3. going on, nearly; almost: It's going on four o'clock.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.going - the act of departinggoing - the act of departing      
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
breaking away - departing hastily
leave-taking, parting, farewell, leave - the act of departing politely; "he disliked long farewells"; "he took his leave"; "parting is such sweet sorrow"
French leave - an abrupt and unannounced departure (without saying farewell)
disappearance, disappearing - the act of leaving secretly or without explanation
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
sailing - the departure of a vessel from a port
boarding, embarkation, embarkment - the act of passengers and crew getting aboard a ship or aircraft
exit - the act of going out
dispatch, shipment, despatch - the act of sending off something
takeoff - a departure; especially of airplanes
2.going - euphemistic expressions for death; "thousands mourned his passing"
euphemism - an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
death, decease, expiry - the event of dying or departure from life; "her death came as a terrible shock"; "upon your decease the capital will pass to your grandchildren"
3.going - advancing toward a goal; "persuading him was easy going"; "the proposal faces tough sledding"
accomplishment, achievement - the action of accomplishing something
Adj.1.going - in full operation; "a going concern"
active - full of activity or engaged in continuous activity; "an active seaport"; "an active bond market"; "an active account"

going

adjective current, accepted, standard, usual, typical She says that's the going rate for a house this big.

going

noun
The act of leaving:
adjective
In action or full operation:
Translations
حالي، في الوقْت الحاضِرذَهاب، حَرَكَهظُروفناجِح
běžnýdobře jdoucífuškaodchodoříšek
gældendetrafikvellykket
jelenleg érvényesmenés
færîförgang-, markaîs-, gildandisem blómstrar/gengur vel
dobre fungujúcifuška

going

[ˈgəʊɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= departure) → salida f, partida f
see also coming B
2. (= progress) it was slow goingse avanzaba a paso lento
good going!¡bien hecho!
that was good goingeso fue muy rápido
the climb was hard goingla subida fue muy dura
the meeting was hard goingen la reunión se complicaron bastante las cosas
the book was heavy goingla lectura del libro resultó pesada
it's heavy going talking to heres pesado hablar con ella
3. (= state of surface etc) → estado m del camino (Horse racing etc) → estado m de la pista
let's cross while the going is goodaprovechemos para cruzar
we made money while the going was goodmientras las condiciones eran favorables ganábamos dinero
B. ADJ
1. (= thriving) [business, concern] → establecido
2. (= current) [price, rate] → corriente
3. (= available) the best one goingel mejor que hay

going

[ˈgəʊɪŋ]
n
(= state of ground) → état m du terrain
when the going gets tough (fig)quand ça commence à être dur
while the going is good (fig)au bon moment
(HORSE RACING)état m du terrain
(= progress) → progression f
it was slow going → les progrès étaient lents, ça n'avançait pas
that's not bad going, that's good going (mainly British)c'est pas mal
to be hard going → être dur
It was hard going → Ça a été dur.
slow going
It was slow going getting the facts out of our boss → Ce n'était pas facile de tirer les vers du nez de notre patron.
to be heavy going → être difficile
adj (= current) [price, rate] → actuel(le)
the going price for sth → le prix actuel de qch
the going rate → le tarif (en vigueur)going concern naffaire f en activitégoing on prep (= nearly)
We've been married for going on two years → Nous sommes mariés depuis bientôt deux ans maintenant.
He's going on 50 → Il va sur la cinquantaine.going-over [ˌgəʊɪŋˈəʊvər] n
(= check) → vérification f, révision f
(= beating) → passage m à tabac
to give sb a good going-over → passer qn à tabacgoings-on [ˌgəʊɪŋzˈɒn] npl (= behaviour) → manigances fpl (= happenings) → événements mpl

going

prp of go
n
(= departure)Weggang m, → (Weg)gehen nt
(= pace, conditions) it’s slow goinges geht nur langsam voran; that’s good goingdas ist ein flottes Tempo; that’s not bad going for youdas ist gar nicht schlecht für deine Verhältnisse; the going is good/soft/hard (Horse-racing) → die Bahn ist gut/weich/hart; the road was rough goingman kam auf der Straße nur mit Mühe voran; it’s heavy going talking to himes ist sehr mühsam, sich mit ihm zu unterhalten; to get out while the going is goodsich rechtzeitig absetzen; when the going gets toughwenn es hart auf hart kommt; when the going gets tough, the tough get goingwenn es hart auf hart kommt zeigt sich, wer wirklich was kann
adj
(= customary) rate, pricegängig, üblich
(after superl: inf) the best thing goingdas Beste überhaupt; the biggest fool goingder allergrößte Idiot
a going concern (Comm) → ein gut gehendes Unternehmen; to sell a business as a going concernein bestehendes Unternehmen verkaufen; to be a going concern (fig: = successful) → ein Erfolg msein; (= working)in Betrieb sein; (= in existence)bestehen; he sold me the car as a going concern (hum)als er mir das Auto verkaufte, lief es angeblich noch

going

[ˈgəʊɪŋ]
1. n
a. (pace) → andatura, ritmo
it was slow going → si andava a rilento
that was good going → è stata una cosa veloce
b. (state of road surface) → percorribilità; (in horse-racing) → terreno
let's get out while the going is good → è meglio uscirne finché sia possibile
it's heavy going talking to her → parlare con lei è una faticaccia
2. adj
a. a going concernun'azienda avviata
b. (current, price) → corrente, attuale
the going rate → la tariffa in vigore

go

(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
adjective
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
noun
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.
References in classic literature ?
Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason Mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas was because it is going to be a hard winter for everyone; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army.
He had been ill for a year after the experience in Pennsylva- nia, and after his recovery worked as a day laborer in the fields, going timidly about and striving to con- ceal his hands.
When she was not going to a dance, she sewed until midnight.
That law trial was a slow business -- appeared like they warn't ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I'd borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep from getting a cowhiding.
Both fountains were going furiously and both pumps bailing with might and main.
And Tom said he'd bet the quarreling was all Jubiter's fault, and he was going to be on hand the first time he got a chance, and see; and if it was so, he was going to do his level best to get Uncle Silas to turn him off.
And when he came back he told the animals it was all right--the sailor was going to lend them the boat.
One day an old man went to a stream to dip in a crust of bread which he was going to eat, when a dog came out of the water, snatched the bread from his hand, and ran away.
Ulysses is not going to be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out death and destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who live in Ithaca.
I wish thee wast going all the way wi' me, and as happy as I am.
As they came to the castle, all was as the fox had said, and at twelve o'clock the young man met the princes going to the bath and gave her the kiss, and she agreed to run away with him, but begged with many tears that he would let her take leave of her father.
Put on your hat this moment -- there is no time to be lost -- we are going to Bristol.