golden plover

(redirected from golden plovers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

golden plover

n
(Animals) any of several plovers of the genus Pluvialis, such as P. apricaria of Europe and Asia, that have golden brown back, head, and wings
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.golden plover - plovers of Europe and America having the backs marked with golden-yellow spotsgolden plover - plovers of Europe and America having the backs marked with golden-yellow spots
plover - any of numerous chiefly shorebirds of relatively compact build having straight bills and large pointed wings; closely related to the sandpipers
genus Pluvialis, Pluvialis - golden plovers
Translations
kapustarinta
References in periodicals archive ?
Rare wildlife includes otters, red grouse, golden plovers, curlews, ring ouzels and peregrine falcons.
By restoring and managing this habitat sensitively, the RSPB aims to give a long-term home to a range of wildlife from breeding waders such as curlews and golden plovers to short-eared owls.
Lydia Tague, of RSPB Saltholme, said: "At this time of year we get some great seasonal visitors onto our reserve such as golden plovers and blacktailed godwits, which means there is always something different to look out for.
On nearby pasture, sheep shared their grazing with hundreds of Lapwings, and the view was brightened by a dozen Golden Plovers, their arrival preceded by a mournful whistle.
I moved on to Malltraeth Cob, one of my favourite places in winter, where hundreds of golden plovers roved overhead and a few dozen pintails drifted gracefully on the incoming Cefni estuary.
5 sq m barn in Gloucestershire and home to lesser horseshoe bats to huge areas such as 37,000 hectares of the Humber estuary, where a colony of grey seals and 50,000 golden plovers are found.
MOOR HOUSE UPPER TEESDALE, County Durham: Golden plovers, lapwings and oystercatchers return to their nesting areas in early spring.
They fear rare birds including buzzards, hen harriers, golden plovers and curlews could be at serious risk if wind farms continue to be built in nesting areas.
Moorland-nesting merlins and golden plovers head downhill and may spend their winters on low-lying farmland or coastal marshes only a few miles from where they bred.
The population of Golden Plovers in our study will likely be extinct in around 100 years if temperature predictions are correct and the birds cannot adapt to feed on other prey sources," explained Newcastle University's Dr Mark Whittingham, who worked on the study with scientists from RSPB Scotland and Aberystwyth and Manchester universities.
Scientists say it could lead to the extinction of some birds which feed on cranefly, such as golden plovers, by the end of the century.
Warmer weather in the spring is encouraging golden plovers to breed more than a week earlier than they did 20 years ago.