kinglet

(redirected from golden-crowned kinglets)
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Related to golden-crowned kinglets: ruby-crowned kinglet

king·let

 (kĭng′lĭt)
n.
1. Any of several small grayish birds of the widely distributed genus Regulus, having a yellowish or reddish patch on the crown of the head.
2. A king ruling a kingdom considered small or unimportant.

kinglet

(ˈkɪŋlɪt)
n
1. often derogatory the king of a small or insignificant territory
2. (Animals) US and Canadian any of various small warblers of the genus Regulus, having a black-edged yellow crown: family Muscicapidae

king•let

(ˈkɪŋ lɪt)

n.
1. a king ruling over a small country or territory.
2. any of several very small songbirds of the genus Regulus, of the Northern Hemisphere, having a patch of bright color on the crown of the head.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kinglet - small birds resembling warblers but having some of the habits of titmicekinglet - small birds resembling warblers but having some of the habits of titmice
warbler - a small active songbird
genus Regulus, Regulus - a genus of birds of the family Sylviidae including kinglets
goldcrest, golden-crested kinglet, Regulus regulus - European kinglet with a black-bordered yellow crown patch
gold-crowned kinglet, Regulus satrata - American golden-crested kinglet
Regulus calendula, ruby-crowned kinglet, ruby-crowned wren - American kinglet with a notable song and in the male a red crown patch
Translations

kinglet

n
(US: Orn) → Goldhähnchen nt
(= king)König meines kleinen oder unbedeutenden Landes
References in periodicals archive ?
If all and only golden-crowned kinglets nested in the branches of oak trees, that nesting behavior could be used as a standard for determining what counts as a golden-crowned kinglet.
For most of the year, these birds feed in mixed flocks along with golden-crowned kinglets, black-capped chickadees, and red-breasted nuthatches.
Duarte was surprised to learn last year from one of the trail's creators that WildSpring's five wooded cabins share land with Pacific-scope flycatchers, tree swallows, chestnut-backed chickadees, golden-crowned kinglets, Swainson's thrush, wrentits and a half-dozen other feathered varieties, all spotted by sound in a five-minute period by birder Steven Shunk.