golf


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Related to golf: golf equipment, Golf clubs

golf

 (gŏlf, gôlf)
n.
A game played on a large outdoor course with a series of 9 or 18 holes spaced far apart, the object being to propel a small, hard ball with the use of various clubs into each hole with as few strokes as possible.
v. golfed, golf·ing, golfs
v.intr.
To play this game: She golfed every day on her vacation.
v.tr.
To play this game at (a location): He golfed 18 holes this morning. I golfed the municipal course last Saturday.

[Middle English.]

golf′er n.

golf

(ɡɒlf)
n
(Golf)
a. a game played on a large open course, the object of which is to hit a ball using clubs, with as few strokes as possible, into each of usually 18 holes
b. (as modifier): a golf bag.
vb
(Golf) (intr) to play golf
[C15: perhaps from Middle Dutch colf club]

Golf

(ɡɒlf)
n
(Telecommunications) communications a code word for the letter g

golf

(gɒlf, gɔlf; Brit. also gɒf)

n.
1. a game in which clubs are used to hit a small ball into a series of holes, usu. 9 or 18, situated over a course, the object being to get the ball into each hole in as few strokes as possible.
v.i.
2. to play golf.
[1425–75]
golf′er, n.

Golf

 

See Also: SPORTS

  1. Addressed his ball as if he were stroking a cat —P. G. Wodehouse Wodehouse, known for his humorous golf stories, not surprisingly coined many funny golf similes.
  2. The ball breasting the hill like some untamed jack-rabbit of the California prairie —P. G. Wodehouse
  3. Before making a shot, he would inspect his enormous bag of clubs and take out one after another, slowly, as if he were playing spillikens —P. G. Wodehouse
  4. Brooded over each shot like one whose heart is bowed down by bad news from home —P. G. Wodehouse
  5. Drove as if he were cracking a whip —P. G. Wodehouse
  6. Golf is like a love affair: if you don’t take it seriously, it’s no fun. If you do take it seriously, it breaks your heart —Arnold Daly, Reader’s Digest, November, 1933
  7. He stood over his ball, pawing at it with his driving-iron like a cat investigating a tortoise —P. G. Wodehouse
  8. He whiffed that baby [the ball] so bad he torqued like a licorice twist and found his head looking straight behind him like a cockatoo —Joseph Wambaugh
  9. I’m playing like Tarzan and scoring like Jane —Chi Chi Rodriguez quoted in the 1987 Masters tournament by Dick Schaap
  10. A man … with thirty-eight golfless years behind him … loses all sense of proportion [when he takes up the game] … like a fly that happens to be sitting on the wall of the dam just when the crack comes —P. G. Wodehouse
  11. Scooped with his mashie as if he were ladling soup —P. G. Wodehouse
  12. Stood addressing his ball [to tee off] like Lot’s wife just after she had been turned into a pillar of salt —P. G. Wodehouse
  13. That poor golf ball … perched on the tee, as naked as a quarterback without a helmet —Dave Anderson, New York Times/Sports of the Times, May 11, 1987
  14. Wielded his midiron like one killing snakes —P. G. Wodehouse
  15. With infinite caution, like one suspecting a trap of some kind, he selected clubs from his bulging bag —P. G. Wodehouse

golf


Past participle: golfed
Gerund: golfing

Imperative
golf
golf
Present
I golf
you golf
he/she/it golfs
we golf
you golf
they golf
Preterite
I golfed
you golfed
he/she/it golfed
we golfed
you golfed
they golfed
Present Continuous
I am golfing
you are golfing
he/she/it is golfing
we are golfing
you are golfing
they are golfing
Present Perfect
I have golfed
you have golfed
he/she/it has golfed
we have golfed
you have golfed
they have golfed
Past Continuous
I was golfing
you were golfing
he/she/it was golfing
we were golfing
you were golfing
they were golfing
Past Perfect
I had golfed
you had golfed
he/she/it had golfed
we had golfed
you had golfed
they had golfed
Future
I will golf
you will golf
he/she/it will golf
we will golf
you will golf
they will golf
Future Perfect
I will have golfed
you will have golfed
he/she/it will have golfed
we will have golfed
you will have golfed
they will have golfed
Future Continuous
I will be golfing
you will be golfing
he/she/it will be golfing
we will be golfing
you will be golfing
they will be golfing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been golfing
you have been golfing
he/she/it has been golfing
we have been golfing
you have been golfing
they have been golfing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been golfing
you will have been golfing
he/she/it will have been golfing
we will have been golfing
you will have been golfing
they will have been golfing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been golfing
you had been golfing
he/she/it had been golfing
we had been golfing
you had been golfing
they had been golfing
Conditional
I would golf
you would golf
he/she/it would golf
we would golf
you would golf
they would golf
Past Conditional
I would have golfed
you would have golfed
he/she/it would have golfed
we would have golfed
you would have golfed
they would have golfed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.golf - a game played on a large open course with 9 or 18 holesgolf - a game played on a large open course with 9 or 18 holes; the object is use as few strokes as possible in playing all the holes
outdoor game - an athletic game that is played outdoors
professional golf - playing golf for money
round of golf, round - the activity of playing 18 holes of golf; "a round of golf takes about 4 hours"
medal play, stroke play - golf scoring by total strokes taken
match play - golf scoring by holes won
miniature golf - a novelty version of golf played with golf balls and putters on a miniature course featuring many obstacles
clock golf - a form of golf in which you putt from positions arranged on the circumference of a circle around the hole
approach shot, approach - a relatively short golf shot intended to put the ball onto the putting green; "he lost the hole when his approach rolled over the green"
chip shot, chip - (golf) a low running approach shot
driving iron, one iron - (golf) the long iron with the most nearly vertical face
club head, clubhead, club-head, golf-club head - (golf) the head of the club which strikes the ball
golf course, links course - course consisting of a large landscaped area for playing golf
golf equipment - sports equipment used in playing golf
driving range, golf range - a practice range for practicing golf shots
heel - (golf) the part of the clubhead where it joins the shaft
plus fours - men's baggy knickers hanging below the knees; formerly worn for sports (especially golf)
toe - (golf) the part of a clubhead farthest from the shaft
wedge - (golf) an iron with considerable loft and a broad sole
whip - (golf) the flexibility of the shaft of a golf club
loft - (golf) the backward slant on the head of some golf clubs that is designed to drive the ball high in the air
address - the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball
scratch - (golf) a handicap of zero strokes; "a golfer who plays at scratch should be able to achieve par on a course"
scorecard, card - (golf) a record of scores (as in golf); "you have to turn in your card to get a handicap"
apron - (golf) the part of the fairway leading onto the green
divot - a piece of turf dug out of a lawn or fairway (by an animals hooves or a golf club)
divot - (golf) the cavity left when a piece of turf is cut from the ground by the club head in making a stroke; "it was a good drive but the ball ended up in a divot"
greenskeeper - someone responsible for the maintenance of a golf course
medal winner, medalist, medallist - (golf) the winner at medal play of a tournament
stroke - (golf) the unit of scoring in golf is the act of hitting the ball with a club; "Nicklaus won by three strokes"
birdie - (golf) a score of one stroke under par on a hole
bogey - (golf) a score of one stroke over par on a hole
double-bogey - (golf) a score of two strokes over par for a hole
eagle - (golf) a score of two strokes under par on a hole
double eagle - (golf) a score of three strokes under par on a hole
par - (golf) the standard number of strokes set for each hole on a golf course, or for the entire course; "a par-5 hole"; "par for this course is 72"
address - adjust and aim (a golf ball) at in preparation of hitting
tee off - strike a ball from the teeing ground at the start of a hole
par - make a score (on a hole) equal to par
ace - play (a hole) in one stroke
caddie, caddy - act as a caddie and carry clubs for a player
eagle - shoot in two strokes under par
hole up - score a hole in one
carry - cover a certain distance or advance beyond; "The drive carried to the green"
toe - drive (a golf ball) with the toe of the club
shank - hit (a golf ball) with the heel of a club, causing the ball to veer in the wrong direction
putt - strike (a golf ball) lightly, with a putter; "he putted the ball several feet past the hole"
putt - hit a putt; "he lost because he putted so poorly"
heel - strike with the heel of the club; "heel a golf ball"
toe - hit (a golf ball) with the toe of the club
drive - strike with a driver, as in teeing off; "drive a golf ball"
hole, hole out - hit the ball into the hole
slice - hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels in a different direction
hook - hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels to the left
sclaff - strike (the ground) in making a sclaff
sclaff - strike (a golf ball) such that the ground is scraped first
tee, tee up - place on a tee; "tee golf balls"
chip - play a chip shot
Verb1.golf - play golf
play - participate in games or sport; "We played hockey all afternoon"; "play cards"; "Pele played for the Brazilian teams in many important matches"

golf

Golf terms

ace (U.S.), air shot or fresh air shot, albatross, approach, apron, back nine (chiefly U.S.), backswing, bag, ball, bandit, better-ball, birdie, blade, bogey, borrow, bunker, trap, or (esp. U.S. & Canad.) sand trap, caddie, caddie car, carry, casual water, chip, club, clubhouse, course, cup, cut, divot, dormie, downswing, draw, drive, driver, driving range, duff, eagle, fade, fairway, fluff, foozle, fore, four-ball, foursome, front nine (chiefly U.S.), gimme, green, green fee, green keeper, greensome, grip, half, half shot, handicap, hazard, heel, hole, hole in one, honour, hook, hosel, iron, ladies' tee, lag, lie, links, local rules, loft, long iron, marker, match play, medal play, medal tee, midiron, nine-hole course, nineteenth hole, par, pin, pitch and run, pitching wedge, pitch shot, play through, plus fours, plus twos, practice swing, pull, putt, putter, putting green, rabbit, recovery, rough, round, rub of the green, run, Royal and Ancient or R & A, sand wedge, sclaff, score, score card, scratch, shaft, shank, short iron, single, slice, slow play, spoon, Stableford system, stance, stroke, stroke play, stymie, sweetspot, swing, take-away, tee, thin, tiger, threesome, top, trolley, waggle, wedge, wood, yips
Translations
gholf
لُعْبَةُ الـجُولْفلُعْبَة الغولْفيَلْعَب الغولْف
Голф
golfhrát golf
golf
golfo
golfGustav
گلف
golfGideon
golf
golfgolfozik
golf
golfleika golf
ゴルフ
골프
golfasgolfo aikštelėgolfo klubasgolfo lazdagolfo žaidėjas
golfsspēlēt golfu
hrať golf
golf
голф
golf
กอล์ฟกีฬากอล์ฟ
golfgolf oynamak
гольф
golfmôn chơi gôn

golf

[gɒlf]
A. Ngolf m
B. VIjugar al golf
C. CPD golf ball Npelota f de golf (Typ) → cabeza f de escritura
golf buggy Ncochecito m de golf
golf club N (= society) → club m de golf; (= stick) → palo m de golf
golf course Ncampo m or (LAm) cancha f de golf
golf links NPLcampo m de golf (junto al mar)
see also professional B3

golf

[ˈgɒlf] ngolf m
to play golf → jouer au golf
My dad plays golf → Mon père joue au golf.golf ball n
(GOLF)balle f de golf
(on typewriter)boule fgolf club n
(= organization) → club m de golf
(= iron) → club m, crosse f de golfgolf course nterrain m de golf, golf m

golf

nGolf nt

golf

:
golf bag
nGolftasche f
golf ball
n
Golfball m
(on typewriter) → Kugelkopf m; golf-ball printerKugelkopfdrucker m
golf club
n (= instrument)Golfschläger m; (= association)Golfklub m
golf course
nGolfplatz m

golf

[gɒlf]
1. ngolf m
to play golf → giocare a golf
2. vi to go golfinggiocare a golf

golf

(golf) noun
a game in which a small white ball is hit across open ground and into small holes by means of golf-clubs. He plays golf every Sunday.
verb
to play golf.
ˈgolfing noun
ˈgolfer noun
a person who plays golf. a keen golfer.
ˈgolf-club noun
the long thin stick used to hit the ball in golf. He bought a new set of golf-clubs.
golf club
a society of people who play golf, or the place where they meet. the local golf club.
golf course
the place where golf is played.

golf

لُعْبَةُ الـجُولْف golf golf Golf γκολφ golf golf golf golf golf ゴルフ 골프 golf golf golf golfe гольф golf กีฬากอล์ฟ golf môn chơi gôn 高尔夫球
References in classic literature ?
In the center was a mahogany table, covered with books, and smokers' implements; the walls were decorated with college trophies and colors--flags, posters, photographs and knickknacks--tennis rackets, canoe paddles, golf clubs, and polo sticks.
Among these were a couple of cyclists, a jobbing gardener I employed sometimes, a girl carrying a baby, Gregg the butcher and his little boy, and two or three loafers and golf caddies who were accustomed to hang about the railway station.
Otherwise he plays golf and follows the harriers for his figure's sake.
And it is a solemn fact that the English in this Eastern exile have contrived to make a small golf links out of the green scrub and sand; with a comfortable clubhouse at one end of it and this primeval monument at the other.
It was after tea on a summer evening, and the conversation, which had roamed in a desultory, spasmodic fashion from golf clubs to the causes of the change in the obliquity of the ecliptic, came round at last to the question of atavism and hereditary aptitudes.
Archibald, mark you, whose golf was a kind of blend of hockey, Swedish drill, and buck-and-wing dancing.
They talked of the political situation and of golf, of their children and the latest play, of the pictures at the Royal Academy, of the weather and their plans for the holidays.
On the cliff a new town was springing up, with red brick villas round golf links, and a large hotel had recently been opened to cater for the summer visitors; but Philip went there seldom.
An honest and natural slum dialect is more tolerable than the attempt of a phonetically untaught person to imitate the vulgar dialect of the golf club; and I am sorry to say that in spite of the efforts of our Academy of Dramatic Art, there is still too much sham golfing English on our stage, and too little of the noble English of Forbes Robertson.
And Bert touched the fringe of a number of trades in succession--draper's porter, chemist's boy, doctor's page, junior assistant gas-fitter, envelope addresser, milk-cart assistant, golf caddie, and at last helper in a bicycle shop.
Up at nine, played golf at Ranelagh all morning, lunched down there, back to my rooms and changed, called on my tailor, went round to the club, had one game of billiards and four rubbers of bridge.
I can't ride, can't play golf or billiards, and for an unintelligent chap like me," he wound up with a sigh, "there aren't a great many other ways of passing the time.